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The European Market for Animal-Friendly Products in a Societal Context.

Ingenbleek PT, Harvey D, Ilieski V, Immink VM, de Roest K, Schmid O - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Bottom Line: The findings suggest that, given international trade barriers that prevent an improvement of animal welfare through legislation, many stakeholders believe that the market is the most viable direction to improve farm animal welfare.Economic productivity of the chain remains, however, an issue that on a fundamental level conflicts with the objective to improve animal welfare.A more animal-friendly future that is achieved through the market will therefore need substantial policy attention from stakeholders in society.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Marketing and Consumer Behaviour Group, Wageningen University, Hollandseweg 1, 6706 KN, Wageningen, The Netherlands. Paul.Ingenbleek@wur.nl.

ABSTRACT
This article takes a future focus on the direction in which social forces develop the market for animal-friendly products in Europe. On the basis of qualitative data gathered in the context of the European EconWelfare project, the differences across eight European countries are studied. The findings suggest that, given international trade barriers that prevent an improvement of animal welfare through legislation, many stakeholders believe that the market is the most viable direction to improve farm animal welfare. Economic productivity of the chain remains, however, an issue that on a fundamental level conflicts with the objective to improve animal welfare. With the help of a deeper conceptual understanding of willingness to pay for animal welfare, the paper finds that the European market for animal-friendly products is still largely fragmented and that the differences between European countries are considerable. A more animal-friendly future that is achieved through the market will therefore need substantial policy attention from stakeholders in society.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Society’s influences on animal welfare (based on [31]).
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animals-03-00808-f001: Society’s influences on animal welfare (based on [31]).

Mentions: Widely used definitions of animal welfare state that welfare is about an animal’s ability to cope with its environment [28,29]. When applied to sentient animals, animal welfare is therefore about how animals feel, see also Avéros et al. [30]. This sets the animal in the center of any study on animal welfare, including those that focus on the business chain and society at large. The definitions also suggest that animal welfare is in the first place influenced by its direct environment. For farm animals, this environment is largely determined by the production chain (cf. [13]), including all chain members that directly influence how the animal feels—the primary animal caretakers: farmers; transporters; and slaughterers—but excluding members that have no direct influence on how the animal feels—meat or milk processors, retailers, and consumers. The primary animal caretakers create the direct environment for the animal, which influences the abilities of animals to cope with that environment. Everything else has an indirect effect on animal welfare at best, and for the sake of simplicity we refer to the sum of these factors that influence animal welfare indirectly as society. In short, societal influences do not have a direct impact on animal welfare, but they influence the behaviors of actors in the animal-production chains, which in turn influence animal welfare (see also the conceptual framework in Figure 1).


The European Market for Animal-Friendly Products in a Societal Context.

Ingenbleek PT, Harvey D, Ilieski V, Immink VM, de Roest K, Schmid O - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Society’s influences on animal welfare (based on [31]).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494456&req=5

animals-03-00808-f001: Society’s influences on animal welfare (based on [31]).
Mentions: Widely used definitions of animal welfare state that welfare is about an animal’s ability to cope with its environment [28,29]. When applied to sentient animals, animal welfare is therefore about how animals feel, see also Avéros et al. [30]. This sets the animal in the center of any study on animal welfare, including those that focus on the business chain and society at large. The definitions also suggest that animal welfare is in the first place influenced by its direct environment. For farm animals, this environment is largely determined by the production chain (cf. [13]), including all chain members that directly influence how the animal feels—the primary animal caretakers: farmers; transporters; and slaughterers—but excluding members that have no direct influence on how the animal feels—meat or milk processors, retailers, and consumers. The primary animal caretakers create the direct environment for the animal, which influences the abilities of animals to cope with that environment. Everything else has an indirect effect on animal welfare at best, and for the sake of simplicity we refer to the sum of these factors that influence animal welfare indirectly as society. In short, societal influences do not have a direct impact on animal welfare, but they influence the behaviors of actors in the animal-production chains, which in turn influence animal welfare (see also the conceptual framework in Figure 1).

Bottom Line: The findings suggest that, given international trade barriers that prevent an improvement of animal welfare through legislation, many stakeholders believe that the market is the most viable direction to improve farm animal welfare.Economic productivity of the chain remains, however, an issue that on a fundamental level conflicts with the objective to improve animal welfare.A more animal-friendly future that is achieved through the market will therefore need substantial policy attention from stakeholders in society.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Marketing and Consumer Behaviour Group, Wageningen University, Hollandseweg 1, 6706 KN, Wageningen, The Netherlands. Paul.Ingenbleek@wur.nl.

ABSTRACT
This article takes a future focus on the direction in which social forces develop the market for animal-friendly products in Europe. On the basis of qualitative data gathered in the context of the European EconWelfare project, the differences across eight European countries are studied. The findings suggest that, given international trade barriers that prevent an improvement of animal welfare through legislation, many stakeholders believe that the market is the most viable direction to improve farm animal welfare. Economic productivity of the chain remains, however, an issue that on a fundamental level conflicts with the objective to improve animal welfare. With the help of a deeper conceptual understanding of willingness to pay for animal welfare, the paper finds that the European market for animal-friendly products is still largely fragmented and that the differences between European countries are considerable. A more animal-friendly future that is achieved through the market will therefore need substantial policy attention from stakeholders in society.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus