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Impact of Selected Factors on the Occurrence of Contact Dermatitis in Turkeys on Commercial Farms in Germany.

Krautwald-Junghanns ME, Bergmann S, Erhard MH, Fehlhaber K, Hübel J, Ludewig M, Mitterer-Istyagin H, Ziegler N, Bartels T - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Bottom Line: This paper summarizes the results obtained by our working group from 2007 until 2012.The results elucidate the universal problem of foot pad dermatitis (FPD).Prevalence and degree showed a progressive development up to the age of 22-35 days, whereas 63.3% of the poults had foot pad alterations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinic for Birds and Reptiles, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Leipzig, An den Tierkliniken 17, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany. krautwald@vogelklinik.uni-leipzig.de.

ABSTRACT
In a long term research project in Germany the influence of husbandry on the health of fattening turkeys (Study 1) as well as the influence of practiced rearing conditions on the health of turkey poults (Study 2) was examined in 24 farms and at the meat processing plant. In all examined rearing farms, litter samples for the determination of litter moisture were taken. This paper summarizes the results obtained by our working group from 2007 until 2012. The results elucidate the universal problem of foot pad dermatitis (FPD). Nearly 100% of the observed turkeys showed a clinically apparent FPD at the meat processing plant. Furthermore, skin lesions of the breast, especially breast buttons were diagnosed, particularly at the slaughterhouse. FPD was detected in the first week of the rearing phase. Prevalence and degree showed a progressive development up to the age of 22-35 days, whereas 63.3% of the poults had foot pad alterations. As even mild alterations in the foot pad condition can be indicators for suboptimal design of the rearing environment, especially high litter moisture, it is important to focus on the early rearing phase.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Farm specific deviations concerning prevalence of breast buttons (a) Hens (arithmetic mean: 7.8%). (b) Toms (arithmetic mean: 27.2%). Green bars: better than average; red bars: worse than average. P: observed rearing period.
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animals-03-00608-f003: Farm specific deviations concerning prevalence of breast buttons (a) Hens (arithmetic mean: 7.8%). (b) Toms (arithmetic mean: 27.2%). Green bars: better than average; red bars: worse than average. P: observed rearing period.

Mentions: Concerning alterations of the breast skin, male turkeys had a significantly higher prevalence than hens (P < 0.001). In all ten examined flocks of male turkeys, breast buttons (9.0% to 42.7%) as well as hygroma (0.3% to 38.7%) and purulent bursitis (0 to 4.7%) could be diagnosed during each rearing period (Figure 3; Table 2). Eight of these populations show a prevalence of over 5.0% in at least one fattening cycle with regard to the occurrence of hygroma.


Impact of Selected Factors on the Occurrence of Contact Dermatitis in Turkeys on Commercial Farms in Germany.

Krautwald-Junghanns ME, Bergmann S, Erhard MH, Fehlhaber K, Hübel J, Ludewig M, Mitterer-Istyagin H, Ziegler N, Bartels T - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Farm specific deviations concerning prevalence of breast buttons (a) Hens (arithmetic mean: 7.8%). (b) Toms (arithmetic mean: 27.2%). Green bars: better than average; red bars: worse than average. P: observed rearing period.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494451&req=5

animals-03-00608-f003: Farm specific deviations concerning prevalence of breast buttons (a) Hens (arithmetic mean: 7.8%). (b) Toms (arithmetic mean: 27.2%). Green bars: better than average; red bars: worse than average. P: observed rearing period.
Mentions: Concerning alterations of the breast skin, male turkeys had a significantly higher prevalence than hens (P < 0.001). In all ten examined flocks of male turkeys, breast buttons (9.0% to 42.7%) as well as hygroma (0.3% to 38.7%) and purulent bursitis (0 to 4.7%) could be diagnosed during each rearing period (Figure 3; Table 2). Eight of these populations show a prevalence of over 5.0% in at least one fattening cycle with regard to the occurrence of hygroma.

Bottom Line: This paper summarizes the results obtained by our working group from 2007 until 2012.The results elucidate the universal problem of foot pad dermatitis (FPD).Prevalence and degree showed a progressive development up to the age of 22-35 days, whereas 63.3% of the poults had foot pad alterations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinic for Birds and Reptiles, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Leipzig, An den Tierkliniken 17, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany. krautwald@vogelklinik.uni-leipzig.de.

ABSTRACT
In a long term research project in Germany the influence of husbandry on the health of fattening turkeys (Study 1) as well as the influence of practiced rearing conditions on the health of turkey poults (Study 2) was examined in 24 farms and at the meat processing plant. In all examined rearing farms, litter samples for the determination of litter moisture were taken. This paper summarizes the results obtained by our working group from 2007 until 2012. The results elucidate the universal problem of foot pad dermatitis (FPD). Nearly 100% of the observed turkeys showed a clinically apparent FPD at the meat processing plant. Furthermore, skin lesions of the breast, especially breast buttons were diagnosed, particularly at the slaughterhouse. FPD was detected in the first week of the rearing phase. Prevalence and degree showed a progressive development up to the age of 22-35 days, whereas 63.3% of the poults had foot pad alterations. As even mild alterations in the foot pad condition can be indicators for suboptimal design of the rearing environment, especially high litter moisture, it is important to focus on the early rearing phase.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus