Limits...
The Supply Chain's Role in Improving Animal Welfare.

Harvey D, Hubbard C - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Bottom Line: Supply chains are already incorporating citizen/consumer demands for improved animal welfare, especially through product differentiation and the associated segmentation of markets.This citizen-consumer gap has significant consequences on the supply chain, although there is limited literature on the capacity and willingness of supply chains to deliver what the consumer wants and is willing to pay for.This paper outlines an economic analysis of supply chain delivery of improved standards for farm animal welfare in the EU and illustrates the possible consequences of improving animal welfare standards for the supply chain using a prototype belief network analysis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development, and Centre for Rural Economy, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK. david.harvey@ncl.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Supply chains are already incorporating citizen/consumer demands for improved animal welfare, especially through product differentiation and the associated segmentation of markets. Nonetheless, the ability of the chain to deliver high(er) levels and standards of animal welfare is subject to two critical conditions: (a) the innovative and adaptive capacity of the chain to respond to society's demands; (b) the extent to which consumers actually purchase animal-friendly products. Despite a substantial literature reporting estimates of willingness to pay (WTP) for animal welfare, there is a belief that in practice people vote for substantially more and better animal welfare as citizens than they are willing to pay for as consumers. This citizen-consumer gap has significant consequences on the supply chain, although there is limited literature on the capacity and willingness of supply chains to deliver what the consumer wants and is willing to pay for. This paper outlines an economic analysis of supply chain delivery of improved standards for farm animal welfare in the EU and illustrates the possible consequences of improving animal welfare standards for the supply chain using a prototype belief network analysis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Belief Network consequences of improved supply chain capacity.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494447&req=5

animals-03-00767-f007: Belief Network consequences of improved supply chain capacity.

Mentions: However, as Figure 7 illustrates, the belief that the objectives are in conflict is also apparent in this network. Figure 7 shows the consequences of improving supply chain capacity, according to the beliefs of our respondents and given this structure of causality. Improving supply chain capacity from 54.7% strong to 100% strong reduces animal welfare from 20.8% to 11% good, while improving competitiveness from 54.7% to 81.8%. This belief pattern apparently reflects the ‘vicious circle’ of animal welfare referred to in the introduction—that increased competition tends to harm animals as businesses strive to make money—rather than the ‘virtuous circle’ where more intelligent businesses pay attention to both actual and potential consumer and citizen demands, as well as more able producers learning that improved animal welfare can also be more productive, or at least no less productive.


The Supply Chain's Role in Improving Animal Welfare.

Harvey D, Hubbard C - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Belief Network consequences of improved supply chain capacity.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494447&req=5

animals-03-00767-f007: Belief Network consequences of improved supply chain capacity.
Mentions: However, as Figure 7 illustrates, the belief that the objectives are in conflict is also apparent in this network. Figure 7 shows the consequences of improving supply chain capacity, according to the beliefs of our respondents and given this structure of causality. Improving supply chain capacity from 54.7% strong to 100% strong reduces animal welfare from 20.8% to 11% good, while improving competitiveness from 54.7% to 81.8%. This belief pattern apparently reflects the ‘vicious circle’ of animal welfare referred to in the introduction—that increased competition tends to harm animals as businesses strive to make money—rather than the ‘virtuous circle’ where more intelligent businesses pay attention to both actual and potential consumer and citizen demands, as well as more able producers learning that improved animal welfare can also be more productive, or at least no less productive.

Bottom Line: Supply chains are already incorporating citizen/consumer demands for improved animal welfare, especially through product differentiation and the associated segmentation of markets.This citizen-consumer gap has significant consequences on the supply chain, although there is limited literature on the capacity and willingness of supply chains to deliver what the consumer wants and is willing to pay for.This paper outlines an economic analysis of supply chain delivery of improved standards for farm animal welfare in the EU and illustrates the possible consequences of improving animal welfare standards for the supply chain using a prototype belief network analysis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development, and Centre for Rural Economy, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK. david.harvey@ncl.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Supply chains are already incorporating citizen/consumer demands for improved animal welfare, especially through product differentiation and the associated segmentation of markets. Nonetheless, the ability of the chain to deliver high(er) levels and standards of animal welfare is subject to two critical conditions: (a) the innovative and adaptive capacity of the chain to respond to society's demands; (b) the extent to which consumers actually purchase animal-friendly products. Despite a substantial literature reporting estimates of willingness to pay (WTP) for animal welfare, there is a belief that in practice people vote for substantially more and better animal welfare as citizens than they are willing to pay for as consumers. This citizen-consumer gap has significant consequences on the supply chain, although there is limited literature on the capacity and willingness of supply chains to deliver what the consumer wants and is willing to pay for. This paper outlines an economic analysis of supply chain delivery of improved standards for farm animal welfare in the EU and illustrates the possible consequences of improving animal welfare standards for the supply chain using a prototype belief network analysis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus