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The Supply Chain's Role in Improving Animal Welfare.

Harvey D, Hubbard C - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Bottom Line: Supply chains are already incorporating citizen/consumer demands for improved animal welfare, especially through product differentiation and the associated segmentation of markets.This citizen-consumer gap has significant consequences on the supply chain, although there is limited literature on the capacity and willingness of supply chains to deliver what the consumer wants and is willing to pay for.This paper outlines an economic analysis of supply chain delivery of improved standards for farm animal welfare in the EU and illustrates the possible consequences of improving animal welfare standards for the supply chain using a prototype belief network analysis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development, and Centre for Rural Economy, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK. david.harvey@ncl.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Supply chains are already incorporating citizen/consumer demands for improved animal welfare, especially through product differentiation and the associated segmentation of markets. Nonetheless, the ability of the chain to deliver high(er) levels and standards of animal welfare is subject to two critical conditions: (a) the innovative and adaptive capacity of the chain to respond to society's demands; (b) the extent to which consumers actually purchase animal-friendly products. Despite a substantial literature reporting estimates of willingness to pay (WTP) for animal welfare, there is a belief that in practice people vote for substantially more and better animal welfare as citizens than they are willing to pay for as consumers. This citizen-consumer gap has significant consequences on the supply chain, although there is limited literature on the capacity and willingness of supply chains to deliver what the consumer wants and is willing to pay for. This paper outlines an economic analysis of supply chain delivery of improved standards for farm animal welfare in the EU and illustrates the possible consequences of improving animal welfare standards for the supply chain using a prototype belief network analysis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

EconWelfare Belief Network (beta version).
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animals-03-00767-f003: EconWelfare Belief Network (beta version).

Mentions: Identifying the consequences of these generally preferred policies and instruments for the competitiveness of European agriculture is a tall order, and is plagued by both imprecision of the specific instruments and their effects, and about general uncertainty of the consequences. However, it is possible to propose an initial specification (called ‘alpha’ in the belief network literature) of the general causal relationships between these major instruments and policies based on the conceptual framework outlined in the previous section. An alpha version of the belief network was presented to 20 stakeholders (NGO, industry, academic and farmer representatives) at a workshop in March 2011. During this interactive workshop, stakeholders were asked to consider and amend—according to their animal welfare expertise and beliefs—the general structure of the model (the definition of nodes) and the direction of causality (edges) between the nodes. The amended alpha model was subsequently presented to the European Farm Animal Welfare Council meeting in Bergen in March, 2011 and the members were also asked to contribute to the improvement of this model. In addition, researchers involved in the Econ Welfare project have also contributed to the specification of the BBN representation. The result of these discussions was the final beta version (Figure 3).


The Supply Chain's Role in Improving Animal Welfare.

Harvey D, Hubbard C - Animals (Basel) (2013)

EconWelfare Belief Network (beta version).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494447&req=5

animals-03-00767-f003: EconWelfare Belief Network (beta version).
Mentions: Identifying the consequences of these generally preferred policies and instruments for the competitiveness of European agriculture is a tall order, and is plagued by both imprecision of the specific instruments and their effects, and about general uncertainty of the consequences. However, it is possible to propose an initial specification (called ‘alpha’ in the belief network literature) of the general causal relationships between these major instruments and policies based on the conceptual framework outlined in the previous section. An alpha version of the belief network was presented to 20 stakeholders (NGO, industry, academic and farmer representatives) at a workshop in March 2011. During this interactive workshop, stakeholders were asked to consider and amend—according to their animal welfare expertise and beliefs—the general structure of the model (the definition of nodes) and the direction of causality (edges) between the nodes. The amended alpha model was subsequently presented to the European Farm Animal Welfare Council meeting in Bergen in March, 2011 and the members were also asked to contribute to the improvement of this model. In addition, researchers involved in the Econ Welfare project have also contributed to the specification of the BBN representation. The result of these discussions was the final beta version (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Supply chains are already incorporating citizen/consumer demands for improved animal welfare, especially through product differentiation and the associated segmentation of markets.This citizen-consumer gap has significant consequences on the supply chain, although there is limited literature on the capacity and willingness of supply chains to deliver what the consumer wants and is willing to pay for.This paper outlines an economic analysis of supply chain delivery of improved standards for farm animal welfare in the EU and illustrates the possible consequences of improving animal welfare standards for the supply chain using a prototype belief network analysis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development, and Centre for Rural Economy, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK. david.harvey@ncl.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Supply chains are already incorporating citizen/consumer demands for improved animal welfare, especially through product differentiation and the associated segmentation of markets. Nonetheless, the ability of the chain to deliver high(er) levels and standards of animal welfare is subject to two critical conditions: (a) the innovative and adaptive capacity of the chain to respond to society's demands; (b) the extent to which consumers actually purchase animal-friendly products. Despite a substantial literature reporting estimates of willingness to pay (WTP) for animal welfare, there is a belief that in practice people vote for substantially more and better animal welfare as citizens than they are willing to pay for as consumers. This citizen-consumer gap has significant consequences on the supply chain, although there is limited literature on the capacity and willingness of supply chains to deliver what the consumer wants and is willing to pay for. This paper outlines an economic analysis of supply chain delivery of improved standards for farm animal welfare in the EU and illustrates the possible consequences of improving animal welfare standards for the supply chain using a prototype belief network analysis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus