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The Supply Chain's Role in Improving Animal Welfare.

Harvey D, Hubbard C - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Bottom Line: Supply chains are already incorporating citizen/consumer demands for improved animal welfare, especially through product differentiation and the associated segmentation of markets.This citizen-consumer gap has significant consequences on the supply chain, although there is limited literature on the capacity and willingness of supply chains to deliver what the consumer wants and is willing to pay for.This paper outlines an economic analysis of supply chain delivery of improved standards for farm animal welfare in the EU and illustrates the possible consequences of improving animal welfare standards for the supply chain using a prototype belief network analysis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development, and Centre for Rural Economy, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK. david.harvey@ncl.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Supply chains are already incorporating citizen/consumer demands for improved animal welfare, especially through product differentiation and the associated segmentation of markets. Nonetheless, the ability of the chain to deliver high(er) levels and standards of animal welfare is subject to two critical conditions: (a) the innovative and adaptive capacity of the chain to respond to society's demands; (b) the extent to which consumers actually purchase animal-friendly products. Despite a substantial literature reporting estimates of willingness to pay (WTP) for animal welfare, there is a belief that in practice people vote for substantially more and better animal welfare as citizens than they are willing to pay for as consumers. This citizen-consumer gap has significant consequences on the supply chain, although there is limited literature on the capacity and willingness of supply chains to deliver what the consumer wants and is willing to pay for. This paper outlines an economic analysis of supply chain delivery of improved standards for farm animal welfare in the EU and illustrates the possible consequences of improving animal welfare standards for the supply chain using a prototype belief network analysis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Animal welfare development road [3].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494447&req=5

animals-03-00767-f001: Animal welfare development road [3].

Mentions: An original aim of the EU EconWelfare project, as is implicit in the title, was to estimate the economic impact (costs and benefits) of upgrading animal welfare standards on the EU supply chain and its competitiveness. However, as the project progressed, it rapidly became apparent that this aim cannot be met other than through very specific and highly conditional illustrative case studies. The bulk of the project output consisted of a comprehensive documentation of existing initiatives and supply chain developments towards higher standards and an intensive stakeholder engagement programme to identify the most promising policy instruments to assist further development without compromising the competitiveness of EU supply chains. Overall, the project identified a possible ‘road’ towards improved animal welfare within the EU, based on extensive stakeholder consultation and review of existing initiatives, as shown in Figure 1, which exhibits the classic adoption S-curve. This outline of the potential and actual progression towards improved animal welfare identifies the key elements of informing and mobilizing consumer preferences from a baseline of compliance with basic legislation (1), through raised awareness (2), to new product development (3), which generates products associated with improved welfare, which might then become the mainstream product lines (4), subsequently (or perhaps simultaneously) to be integrated with other issues such as sustainability, environmentally friendly and local production (5).


The Supply Chain's Role in Improving Animal Welfare.

Harvey D, Hubbard C - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Animal welfare development road [3].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494447&req=5

animals-03-00767-f001: Animal welfare development road [3].
Mentions: An original aim of the EU EconWelfare project, as is implicit in the title, was to estimate the economic impact (costs and benefits) of upgrading animal welfare standards on the EU supply chain and its competitiveness. However, as the project progressed, it rapidly became apparent that this aim cannot be met other than through very specific and highly conditional illustrative case studies. The bulk of the project output consisted of a comprehensive documentation of existing initiatives and supply chain developments towards higher standards and an intensive stakeholder engagement programme to identify the most promising policy instruments to assist further development without compromising the competitiveness of EU supply chains. Overall, the project identified a possible ‘road’ towards improved animal welfare within the EU, based on extensive stakeholder consultation and review of existing initiatives, as shown in Figure 1, which exhibits the classic adoption S-curve. This outline of the potential and actual progression towards improved animal welfare identifies the key elements of informing and mobilizing consumer preferences from a baseline of compliance with basic legislation (1), through raised awareness (2), to new product development (3), which generates products associated with improved welfare, which might then become the mainstream product lines (4), subsequently (or perhaps simultaneously) to be integrated with other issues such as sustainability, environmentally friendly and local production (5).

Bottom Line: Supply chains are already incorporating citizen/consumer demands for improved animal welfare, especially through product differentiation and the associated segmentation of markets.This citizen-consumer gap has significant consequences on the supply chain, although there is limited literature on the capacity and willingness of supply chains to deliver what the consumer wants and is willing to pay for.This paper outlines an economic analysis of supply chain delivery of improved standards for farm animal welfare in the EU and illustrates the possible consequences of improving animal welfare standards for the supply chain using a prototype belief network analysis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development, and Centre for Rural Economy, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK. david.harvey@ncl.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Supply chains are already incorporating citizen/consumer demands for improved animal welfare, especially through product differentiation and the associated segmentation of markets. Nonetheless, the ability of the chain to deliver high(er) levels and standards of animal welfare is subject to two critical conditions: (a) the innovative and adaptive capacity of the chain to respond to society's demands; (b) the extent to which consumers actually purchase animal-friendly products. Despite a substantial literature reporting estimates of willingness to pay (WTP) for animal welfare, there is a belief that in practice people vote for substantially more and better animal welfare as citizens than they are willing to pay for as consumers. This citizen-consumer gap has significant consequences on the supply chain, although there is limited literature on the capacity and willingness of supply chains to deliver what the consumer wants and is willing to pay for. This paper outlines an economic analysis of supply chain delivery of improved standards for farm animal welfare in the EU and illustrates the possible consequences of improving animal welfare standards for the supply chain using a prototype belief network analysis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus