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Emerging Profiles for Cultured Meat; Ethics through and as Design.

van der Weele C, Driessen C - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Bottom Line: The development of cultured meat has gained urgency through the increasing problems associated with meat, but what it might become is still open in many respects.In short, the idea of cultured meat opens up new search space in various ways.We suggest that ethics can take an active part in these searches, by fostering a process that integrates (gut) feelings, imagination and rational thought and that expands the range of our moral identities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Applied Philosophy Group, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 8130, 6700 EW Wageningen, The Netherlands. cor.vanderweele@wur.nl.

ABSTRACT
The development of cultured meat has gained urgency through the increasing problems associated with meat, but what it might become is still open in many respects. In existing debates, two main moral profiles can be distinguished. Vegetarians and vegans who embrace cultured meat emphasize how it could contribute to the diminishment of animal suffering and exploitation, while in a more mainstream profile cultured meat helps to keep meat eating sustainable and affordable. In this paper we argue that these profiles do not exhaust the options and that (gut) feelings as well as imagination are needed to explore possible future options. On the basis of workshops, we present a third moral profile, "the pig in the backyard". Here cultured meat is imagined as an element of a hybrid community of humans and animals that would allow for both the consumption of animal protein and meaningful relations with domestic (farm) animals. Experience in the workshops and elsewhere also illustrates that thinking about cultured meat inspires new thoughts on "normal" meat. In short, the idea of cultured meat opens up new search space in various ways. We suggest that ethics can take an active part in these searches, by fostering a process that integrates (gut) feelings, imagination and rational thought and that expands the range of our moral identities.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Eindhoven student designs of cultured meat.
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animals-03-00647-f002: Eindhoven student designs of cultured meat.

Mentions: Visual design. At the University of Eindhoven, cultured meat is one of the themes in the industrial design program Next Nature, led by Koert van Mensvoort [23]. From the fall of 2011 onward, students of industrial design have been working on many different ideas of what cultured meat could be, what it might look like, how it might be produced, how it might be packaged and marketed, etcetera. One of us (CvdW) has been involved as a “client”, with the aim of using the finished designs as starting points to enlarge the space for thinking about cultured meat in workshops or elsewhere. Figure 2 shows some of the results. Mark Kanters’ Magic Meat (1) is based on the marketing idea to seduce children through magically colored balls. Frank van Valkenhoef’s Origami meat (2) starts from the idea that 3D printing could produce flat layers of muscle cells that might be folded in different ways. Ilse Maessen’s Paint with meat (3) pictures cultured meat of different colors in tubes, for the production of “paintings” to be baked in the oven, while Alberto Gruarin’s Knit the new meat (4) starts from the idea of a narrow thread of muscle cells with which more complicated structures might be put together.


Emerging Profiles for Cultured Meat; Ethics through and as Design.

van der Weele C, Driessen C - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Eindhoven student designs of cultured meat.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494443&req=5

animals-03-00647-f002: Eindhoven student designs of cultured meat.
Mentions: Visual design. At the University of Eindhoven, cultured meat is one of the themes in the industrial design program Next Nature, led by Koert van Mensvoort [23]. From the fall of 2011 onward, students of industrial design have been working on many different ideas of what cultured meat could be, what it might look like, how it might be produced, how it might be packaged and marketed, etcetera. One of us (CvdW) has been involved as a “client”, with the aim of using the finished designs as starting points to enlarge the space for thinking about cultured meat in workshops or elsewhere. Figure 2 shows some of the results. Mark Kanters’ Magic Meat (1) is based on the marketing idea to seduce children through magically colored balls. Frank van Valkenhoef’s Origami meat (2) starts from the idea that 3D printing could produce flat layers of muscle cells that might be folded in different ways. Ilse Maessen’s Paint with meat (3) pictures cultured meat of different colors in tubes, for the production of “paintings” to be baked in the oven, while Alberto Gruarin’s Knit the new meat (4) starts from the idea of a narrow thread of muscle cells with which more complicated structures might be put together.

Bottom Line: The development of cultured meat has gained urgency through the increasing problems associated with meat, but what it might become is still open in many respects.In short, the idea of cultured meat opens up new search space in various ways.We suggest that ethics can take an active part in these searches, by fostering a process that integrates (gut) feelings, imagination and rational thought and that expands the range of our moral identities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Applied Philosophy Group, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 8130, 6700 EW Wageningen, The Netherlands. cor.vanderweele@wur.nl.

ABSTRACT
The development of cultured meat has gained urgency through the increasing problems associated with meat, but what it might become is still open in many respects. In existing debates, two main moral profiles can be distinguished. Vegetarians and vegans who embrace cultured meat emphasize how it could contribute to the diminishment of animal suffering and exploitation, while in a more mainstream profile cultured meat helps to keep meat eating sustainable and affordable. In this paper we argue that these profiles do not exhaust the options and that (gut) feelings as well as imagination are needed to explore possible future options. On the basis of workshops, we present a third moral profile, "the pig in the backyard". Here cultured meat is imagined as an element of a hybrid community of humans and animals that would allow for both the consumption of animal protein and meaningful relations with domestic (farm) animals. Experience in the workshops and elsewhere also illustrates that thinking about cultured meat inspires new thoughts on "normal" meat. In short, the idea of cultured meat opens up new search space in various ways. We suggest that ethics can take an active part in these searches, by fostering a process that integrates (gut) feelings, imagination and rational thought and that expands the range of our moral identities.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus