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Biological Anomalies around the 2009 L'Aquila Earthquake.

Fidani C - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Bottom Line: Around the time of the seismic swarm many instruments were operating in Central Italy, even if not dedicated to biological effects associated with the stress field variations, including seismicity.Data on animal behavior, before, during and after the main shocks, were analyzed in space/time distributions with respect to the epicenter area, evidencing the specific responses of different animals.Several instances of strange animal behavior were observed which could causally support the hypotheses that they were induced by the physical presence of gas, electric charges and electromagnetic waves in atmosphere.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Central Italy Electromagnetic Network, 63847 San Procolo, Fermo, Italy. c.fidani@virgilio.it.

ABSTRACT
The April 6, 2009 L'Aquila earthquake was the strongest seismic event to occur in Italy over the last thirty years with a magnitude of M = 6.3. Around the time of the seismic swarm many instruments were operating in Central Italy, even if not dedicated to biological effects associated with the stress field variations, including seismicity. Testimonies were collected using a specific questionnaire immediately after the main shock, including data on earthquake lights, gas leaks, human diseases, and irregular animal behavior. The questionnaire was made up of a sequence of arguments, based upon past historical earthquake observations and compiled over seven months after the main shock. Data on animal behavior, before, during and after the main shocks, were analyzed in space/time distributions with respect to the epicenter area, evidencing the specific responses of different animals. Several instances of strange animal behavior were observed which could causally support the hypotheses that they were induced by the physical presence of gas, electric charges and electromagnetic waves in atmosphere. The aim of this study was to order the biological observations and thereby allow future work to determine whether these observations were influenced by geophysical parameters.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Dead fish on the surface of Lake Scanno, L’Aquila, Italy, October 10, 2008.
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animals-03-00693-f004: Dead fish on the surface of Lake Scanno, L’Aquila, Italy, October 10, 2008.

Mentions: Many local newspapers reported that: ...nearly 220 dead fish were found on the surface of Lake Scanno (60 km southeast from L'Aquila) on the morning of October 10, 2008. … In particular, about 40 big whitefish and about 180 juvenile perch were found. These species had been introduced into the lake about 20 years prior; (see Figure 4). Several local fishermen reported unusually large numbers of dead fish weeks around the seismic events. The same newspapers had stated a few months before that a fishing boat named Goletta Verde (http://www.legambiente.it/legambiente/about-legambiente) had analyzed the lake water finding it within the norms. Another lake water analysis carried out by ARTA (Agenzia Regionale per la Tutela dell’Ambiente) in September 2008 reported very good water conditions with levels of oxygen above average. The Zooprofilactic Institute of Abruzzo and Molise “G. Caporale” in Teramo, Abruzzo, Italy, conducted some research and on October 25, 2008 reported that: The Institution ruled out that the fish deaths could have been related to infections. Post-mortem examinations and laboratory tests on perch did not obtain significant results; whereas those of whitefish and trout showed congestion of the peritoneum as well as excess mucus of the gills. All tests resulted negative for parasitological and bacteriological disease. This event happened almost 6 months before the earthquake. It is noteworthy because it took place when the earthquake swarm started in L’Aquila [1].


Biological Anomalies around the 2009 L'Aquila Earthquake.

Fidani C - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Dead fish on the surface of Lake Scanno, L’Aquila, Italy, October 10, 2008.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494442&req=5

animals-03-00693-f004: Dead fish on the surface of Lake Scanno, L’Aquila, Italy, October 10, 2008.
Mentions: Many local newspapers reported that: ...nearly 220 dead fish were found on the surface of Lake Scanno (60 km southeast from L'Aquila) on the morning of October 10, 2008. … In particular, about 40 big whitefish and about 180 juvenile perch were found. These species had been introduced into the lake about 20 years prior; (see Figure 4). Several local fishermen reported unusually large numbers of dead fish weeks around the seismic events. The same newspapers had stated a few months before that a fishing boat named Goletta Verde (http://www.legambiente.it/legambiente/about-legambiente) had analyzed the lake water finding it within the norms. Another lake water analysis carried out by ARTA (Agenzia Regionale per la Tutela dell’Ambiente) in September 2008 reported very good water conditions with levels of oxygen above average. The Zooprofilactic Institute of Abruzzo and Molise “G. Caporale” in Teramo, Abruzzo, Italy, conducted some research and on October 25, 2008 reported that: The Institution ruled out that the fish deaths could have been related to infections. Post-mortem examinations and laboratory tests on perch did not obtain significant results; whereas those of whitefish and trout showed congestion of the peritoneum as well as excess mucus of the gills. All tests resulted negative for parasitological and bacteriological disease. This event happened almost 6 months before the earthquake. It is noteworthy because it took place when the earthquake swarm started in L’Aquila [1].

Bottom Line: Around the time of the seismic swarm many instruments were operating in Central Italy, even if not dedicated to biological effects associated with the stress field variations, including seismicity.Data on animal behavior, before, during and after the main shocks, were analyzed in space/time distributions with respect to the epicenter area, evidencing the specific responses of different animals.Several instances of strange animal behavior were observed which could causally support the hypotheses that they were induced by the physical presence of gas, electric charges and electromagnetic waves in atmosphere.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Central Italy Electromagnetic Network, 63847 San Procolo, Fermo, Italy. c.fidani@virgilio.it.

ABSTRACT
The April 6, 2009 L'Aquila earthquake was the strongest seismic event to occur in Italy over the last thirty years with a magnitude of M = 6.3. Around the time of the seismic swarm many instruments were operating in Central Italy, even if not dedicated to biological effects associated with the stress field variations, including seismicity. Testimonies were collected using a specific questionnaire immediately after the main shock, including data on earthquake lights, gas leaks, human diseases, and irregular animal behavior. The questionnaire was made up of a sequence of arguments, based upon past historical earthquake observations and compiled over seven months after the main shock. Data on animal behavior, before, during and after the main shocks, were analyzed in space/time distributions with respect to the epicenter area, evidencing the specific responses of different animals. Several instances of strange animal behavior were observed which could causally support the hypotheses that they were induced by the physical presence of gas, electric charges and electromagnetic waves in atmosphere. The aim of this study was to order the biological observations and thereby allow future work to determine whether these observations were influenced by geophysical parameters.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus