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Biological Anomalies around the 2009 L'Aquila Earthquake.

Fidani C - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Bottom Line: Around the time of the seismic swarm many instruments were operating in Central Italy, even if not dedicated to biological effects associated with the stress field variations, including seismicity.Data on animal behavior, before, during and after the main shocks, were analyzed in space/time distributions with respect to the epicenter area, evidencing the specific responses of different animals.Several instances of strange animal behavior were observed which could causally support the hypotheses that they were induced by the physical presence of gas, electric charges and electromagnetic waves in atmosphere.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Central Italy Electromagnetic Network, 63847 San Procolo, Fermo, Italy. c.fidani@virgilio.it.

ABSTRACT
The April 6, 2009 L'Aquila earthquake was the strongest seismic event to occur in Italy over the last thirty years with a magnitude of M = 6.3. Around the time of the seismic swarm many instruments were operating in Central Italy, even if not dedicated to biological effects associated with the stress field variations, including seismicity. Testimonies were collected using a specific questionnaire immediately after the main shock, including data on earthquake lights, gas leaks, human diseases, and irregular animal behavior. The questionnaire was made up of a sequence of arguments, based upon past historical earthquake observations and compiled over seven months after the main shock. Data on animal behavior, before, during and after the main shocks, were analyzed in space/time distributions with respect to the epicenter area, evidencing the specific responses of different animals. Several instances of strange animal behavior were observed which could causally support the hypotheses that they were induced by the physical presence of gas, electric charges and electromagnetic waves in atmosphere. The aim of this study was to order the biological observations and thereby allow future work to determine whether these observations were influenced by geophysical parameters.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Green and yellow bell peppers and a red tomato, from Bagno, L’Aquila, Italy, August 22, 2009; (b) tomatoes plants in a private garden near the railway station of L’Aquila, Italy, September 14, 2009.
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animals-03-00693-f001: (a) Green and yellow bell peppers and a red tomato, from Bagno, L’Aquila, Italy, August 22, 2009; (b) tomatoes plants in a private garden near the railway station of L’Aquila, Italy, September 14, 2009.

Mentions: Vegetable and fruit anomalies were only observed in small private gardens by their owners. The general report around L’Aquila was that fruit and vegetables had developed quickly without reaching maturity, thereby appearing ruined and wrinkled, see Figure 1. Vegetables in the photo are from Bagno, bell peppers appeared wrinkled and small while tomatoes were small with many white dots.


Biological Anomalies around the 2009 L'Aquila Earthquake.

Fidani C - Animals (Basel) (2013)

(a) Green and yellow bell peppers and a red tomato, from Bagno, L’Aquila, Italy, August 22, 2009; (b) tomatoes plants in a private garden near the railway station of L’Aquila, Italy, September 14, 2009.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494442&req=5

animals-03-00693-f001: (a) Green and yellow bell peppers and a red tomato, from Bagno, L’Aquila, Italy, August 22, 2009; (b) tomatoes plants in a private garden near the railway station of L’Aquila, Italy, September 14, 2009.
Mentions: Vegetable and fruit anomalies were only observed in small private gardens by their owners. The general report around L’Aquila was that fruit and vegetables had developed quickly without reaching maturity, thereby appearing ruined and wrinkled, see Figure 1. Vegetables in the photo are from Bagno, bell peppers appeared wrinkled and small while tomatoes were small with many white dots.

Bottom Line: Around the time of the seismic swarm many instruments were operating in Central Italy, even if not dedicated to biological effects associated with the stress field variations, including seismicity.Data on animal behavior, before, during and after the main shocks, were analyzed in space/time distributions with respect to the epicenter area, evidencing the specific responses of different animals.Several instances of strange animal behavior were observed which could causally support the hypotheses that they were induced by the physical presence of gas, electric charges and electromagnetic waves in atmosphere.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Central Italy Electromagnetic Network, 63847 San Procolo, Fermo, Italy. c.fidani@virgilio.it.

ABSTRACT
The April 6, 2009 L'Aquila earthquake was the strongest seismic event to occur in Italy over the last thirty years with a magnitude of M = 6.3. Around the time of the seismic swarm many instruments were operating in Central Italy, even if not dedicated to biological effects associated with the stress field variations, including seismicity. Testimonies were collected using a specific questionnaire immediately after the main shock, including data on earthquake lights, gas leaks, human diseases, and irregular animal behavior. The questionnaire was made up of a sequence of arguments, based upon past historical earthquake observations and compiled over seven months after the main shock. Data on animal behavior, before, during and after the main shocks, were analyzed in space/time distributions with respect to the epicenter area, evidencing the specific responses of different animals. Several instances of strange animal behavior were observed which could causally support the hypotheses that they were induced by the physical presence of gas, electric charges and electromagnetic waves in atmosphere. The aim of this study was to order the biological observations and thereby allow future work to determine whether these observations were influenced by geophysical parameters.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus