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Spatial and Temporal Habitat Use of an Asian Elephant in Sumatra.

Sitompul AF, Griffin CR, Rayl ND, Fuller TK - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Bottom Line: Further, within the home range, closed canopy forests were used more during the day than at night.When elephants were in closed canopy forests they were most often near the forest edge vs. in the forest interior.Effective elephant conservation strategies in Sumatra need to focus on forest restoration of cleared areas and providing a forest matrix that includes various canopy types.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Conservation Science Initiative, Bogor, 16963, Indonesia. asitompul@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Increasingly, habitat fragmentation caused by agricultural and human development has forced Sumatran elephants into relatively small areas, but there is little information on how elephants use these areas and thus, how habitats can be managed to sustain elephants in the future. Using a Global Positioning System (GPS) collar and a land cover map developed from TM imagery, we identified the habitats used by a wild adult female elephant (Elephas maximus sumatranus) in the Seblat Elephant Conservation Center, Bengkulu Province, Sumatra during 2007-2008. The marked elephant (and presumably her 40-60 herd mates) used a home range that contained more than expected medium canopy and open canopy land cover. Further, within the home range, closed canopy forests were used more during the day than at night. When elephants were in closed canopy forests they were most often near the forest edge vs. in the forest interior. Effective elephant conservation strategies in Sumatra need to focus on forest restoration of cleared areas and providing a forest matrix that includes various canopy types.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Location of study area in Bengkulu Province, Sumatra (lat 02°59'–03°11'S, long 101°34'–101°46'E), and land use within a 314-km2 area, including the Seblat Elephant Conservation Center.
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animals-03-00670-f001: Location of study area in Bengkulu Province, Sumatra (lat 02°59'–03°11'S, long 101°34'–101°46'E), and land use within a 314-km2 area, including the Seblat Elephant Conservation Center.

Mentions: The study was conducted in the Bengkulu Province on the west coast of Sumatra and included the SECC and surrounding forested and developed areas (314 km2; Figure 1). Annual rainfall typically exceeds 3,000 mm and elevations are 75–125 m above sea level with no valleys. The SECC occurs in a lowland rainforest area (Pesisir-Indrapura-Talamau ecofloristic sector; [12]) that has both original primary forest and forests that are regenerating following selective logging operations in the late 1980s. Palm oil plantations, small-scale agricultural areas, and human settlements comprise the majority of non-forested lands. In addition to 23 elephants captured as part of the government’s human-elephant conflict mitigation program and housed at the SECC, a population of 40–60 wild elephants is believed to occur at the SECC, probably occurring mostly as a single herd [11]. During the course of this study our tagged elephant was observed travelling in the elephant group by a forest ranger on elephant back during a routine patrol, and also was seen with the elephant group while they raided the adjacent palm oil plantation. With extensive agriculture and human settlements surrounding much of the SECC, there is much human-elephant conflict in the area; during 2008–2009 in adjacent palm oil plantations, at least 17 conflict incidents occurred and ~2,800 young palm trees were damaged [13].


Spatial and Temporal Habitat Use of an Asian Elephant in Sumatra.

Sitompul AF, Griffin CR, Rayl ND, Fuller TK - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Location of study area in Bengkulu Province, Sumatra (lat 02°59'–03°11'S, long 101°34'–101°46'E), and land use within a 314-km2 area, including the Seblat Elephant Conservation Center.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494438&req=5

animals-03-00670-f001: Location of study area in Bengkulu Province, Sumatra (lat 02°59'–03°11'S, long 101°34'–101°46'E), and land use within a 314-km2 area, including the Seblat Elephant Conservation Center.
Mentions: The study was conducted in the Bengkulu Province on the west coast of Sumatra and included the SECC and surrounding forested and developed areas (314 km2; Figure 1). Annual rainfall typically exceeds 3,000 mm and elevations are 75–125 m above sea level with no valleys. The SECC occurs in a lowland rainforest area (Pesisir-Indrapura-Talamau ecofloristic sector; [12]) that has both original primary forest and forests that are regenerating following selective logging operations in the late 1980s. Palm oil plantations, small-scale agricultural areas, and human settlements comprise the majority of non-forested lands. In addition to 23 elephants captured as part of the government’s human-elephant conflict mitigation program and housed at the SECC, a population of 40–60 wild elephants is believed to occur at the SECC, probably occurring mostly as a single herd [11]. During the course of this study our tagged elephant was observed travelling in the elephant group by a forest ranger on elephant back during a routine patrol, and also was seen with the elephant group while they raided the adjacent palm oil plantation. With extensive agriculture and human settlements surrounding much of the SECC, there is much human-elephant conflict in the area; during 2008–2009 in adjacent palm oil plantations, at least 17 conflict incidents occurred and ~2,800 young palm trees were damaged [13].

Bottom Line: Further, within the home range, closed canopy forests were used more during the day than at night.When elephants were in closed canopy forests they were most often near the forest edge vs. in the forest interior.Effective elephant conservation strategies in Sumatra need to focus on forest restoration of cleared areas and providing a forest matrix that includes various canopy types.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Conservation Science Initiative, Bogor, 16963, Indonesia. asitompul@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Increasingly, habitat fragmentation caused by agricultural and human development has forced Sumatran elephants into relatively small areas, but there is little information on how elephants use these areas and thus, how habitats can be managed to sustain elephants in the future. Using a Global Positioning System (GPS) collar and a land cover map developed from TM imagery, we identified the habitats used by a wild adult female elephant (Elephas maximus sumatranus) in the Seblat Elephant Conservation Center, Bengkulu Province, Sumatra during 2007-2008. The marked elephant (and presumably her 40-60 herd mates) used a home range that contained more than expected medium canopy and open canopy land cover. Further, within the home range, closed canopy forests were used more during the day than at night. When elephants were in closed canopy forests they were most often near the forest edge vs. in the forest interior. Effective elephant conservation strategies in Sumatra need to focus on forest restoration of cleared areas and providing a forest matrix that includes various canopy types.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus