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Sex Differences in Physiological Acclimatization after Transfer in Wistar Rats.

Arts JW, Kramer K, Arndt SS, Ohl F - Animals (Basel) (2014)

Bottom Line: Transfer procedures might have considerable and unintended effects on research results.External transfer was found to decrease body weight, increase plasma corticosterone, increase activity, increase heart rate in female rats, but decrease heart rate in male rats.It is recommended to allow for acclimatization of at least 8 days in males and two weeks in females after external transfer and timely (2 days before starting experiments) transfer the animals internally to the testing room.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Animals in Science & Society, Division of Animal Welfare & Laboratory Animal Science, Veterinary Faculty, Utrecht University, Utrecht, 3584 CM, The Netherlands. j.arts@uu.nl.

ABSTRACT
Most laboratory animals used in research are vendor-bred and transferred to research facilities. Transfer procedures might have considerable and unintended effects on research results. In the present study we compared physiological and behavioral parameters before and after external and internal transfer, as well as between transferred and non-transferred Wistar rats. The impact of both external and internal transfer on body weight, plasma corticosterone levels, heart rate, blood pressure, and locomotor activity was studied in both male and female Wistar rats, taking into account the sex differences in stress responsivity. External transfer was found to decrease body weight, increase plasma corticosterone, increase activity, increase heart rate in female rats, but decrease heart rate in male rats. Parameters showed differences between the sexes and light phases. This study shows that acclimatization after transfer is sex-specific and researchers should take the sex into consideration when determining the acclimatization period. It is recommended to allow for acclimatization of at least 8 days in males and two weeks in females after external transfer and timely (2 days before starting experiments) transfer the animals internally to the testing room.

No MeSH data available.


Timeline of performed procedures.
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animals-04-00693-f001: Timeline of performed procedures.

Mentions: Blood samples were taken at 11 predefined moments during the experiment, always on weekdays at 3–4 h after “lights on” (see Figure 1). The first blood (BS1) sample was taken 5 days before surgery, the second one (BS2) 16 days after surgery. Blood Samples 2–6 (BS2-BS6) were taken weekly in the period of 14 days before until 14 days after transfer, with Blood Sample 5 (BS5) taken on the day of transfer, directly after unpacking in the animal facility. Blood Samples 7 (BS7) and 8 (BS8) were taken after periods of 2 weeks on Days 28 (DAT28) and 42 (DAT42) after transfer. BS9 was taken directly after internal transfer to a different animal room (see “internal transfer”), BS10 and BS11, one and two weeks after internal transfer, respectively. The first blood sample was taken from all animals. The other blood samples were taken from one animal per cage, according to a randomized schedule with equal variation between animals with and without transmitters.


Sex Differences in Physiological Acclimatization after Transfer in Wistar Rats.

Arts JW, Kramer K, Arndt SS, Ohl F - Animals (Basel) (2014)

Timeline of performed procedures.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494431&req=5

animals-04-00693-f001: Timeline of performed procedures.
Mentions: Blood samples were taken at 11 predefined moments during the experiment, always on weekdays at 3–4 h after “lights on” (see Figure 1). The first blood (BS1) sample was taken 5 days before surgery, the second one (BS2) 16 days after surgery. Blood Samples 2–6 (BS2-BS6) were taken weekly in the period of 14 days before until 14 days after transfer, with Blood Sample 5 (BS5) taken on the day of transfer, directly after unpacking in the animal facility. Blood Samples 7 (BS7) and 8 (BS8) were taken after periods of 2 weeks on Days 28 (DAT28) and 42 (DAT42) after transfer. BS9 was taken directly after internal transfer to a different animal room (see “internal transfer”), BS10 and BS11, one and two weeks after internal transfer, respectively. The first blood sample was taken from all animals. The other blood samples were taken from one animal per cage, according to a randomized schedule with equal variation between animals with and without transmitters.

Bottom Line: Transfer procedures might have considerable and unintended effects on research results.External transfer was found to decrease body weight, increase plasma corticosterone, increase activity, increase heart rate in female rats, but decrease heart rate in male rats.It is recommended to allow for acclimatization of at least 8 days in males and two weeks in females after external transfer and timely (2 days before starting experiments) transfer the animals internally to the testing room.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Animals in Science & Society, Division of Animal Welfare & Laboratory Animal Science, Veterinary Faculty, Utrecht University, Utrecht, 3584 CM, The Netherlands. j.arts@uu.nl.

ABSTRACT
Most laboratory animals used in research are vendor-bred and transferred to research facilities. Transfer procedures might have considerable and unintended effects on research results. In the present study we compared physiological and behavioral parameters before and after external and internal transfer, as well as between transferred and non-transferred Wistar rats. The impact of both external and internal transfer on body weight, plasma corticosterone levels, heart rate, blood pressure, and locomotor activity was studied in both male and female Wistar rats, taking into account the sex differences in stress responsivity. External transfer was found to decrease body weight, increase plasma corticosterone, increase activity, increase heart rate in female rats, but decrease heart rate in male rats. Parameters showed differences between the sexes and light phases. This study shows that acclimatization after transfer is sex-specific and researchers should take the sex into consideration when determining the acclimatization period. It is recommended to allow for acclimatization of at least 8 days in males and two weeks in females after external transfer and timely (2 days before starting experiments) transfer the animals internally to the testing room.

No MeSH data available.