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Off-Stream Watering Systems and Partial Barriers as a Strategy to Maximize Cattle Production and Minimize Time Spent in the Riparian Area.

Rawluk AA, Crow G, Legesse G, Veira DM, Bullock PR, González LA, Dubois M, Ominski KH - Animals (Basel) (2014)

Bottom Line: Cattle in 2BARR at the Souris site spent more time in the RP in Period 1 (p < 0.0001) and less time in Period 2 (p = 0.0002) compared to cattle in 3NOBARR.These results indicate that the presence of an OSW does not create significant differences in animal performance when used in extensive pasture scenarios such as those studied within the present study.Whereas the barriers did not consistently discourage watering at the stream, the results provide some indication of the efficacy of the OSW as well as the natural barriers on deterring cattle from the riparian area.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ducks Unlimited Canada, Calgary, T2Z 3V6, Canada. a_rawluk@ducks.ca.

ABSTRACT
A study was conducted in 2009 at two locations in Manitoba (Killarney and Souris), Canada to determine the impact of off-stream waterers (OSW) with or without natural barriers on (i) amount of time cattle spent in the 10 m buffer created within the riparian area, referred to as the riparian polygon (RP), (ii) watering location (OSW or stream), and (iii) animal performance measured as weight gain. This study was divided into three 28-day periods over the grazing season. At each location, the pasture-which ranged from 21.0 ha to 39.2 ha in size-was divided into three treatments: no OSW nor barriers (1CONT), OSW with barriers along the stream bank to deter cattle from watering at the stream (2BARR), and OSW without barriers (3NOBARR). Cattle in 2BARR spent less time in the RP in Periods 1 (p = 0.0002), 2 (p = 0.1116), and 3 (p < 0.0001) at the Killarney site compared to cattle in 3NOBARR at the same site. Cattle in 2BARR at the Souris site spent more time in the RP in Period 1 (p < 0.0001) and less time in Period 2 (p = 0.0002) compared to cattle in 3NOBARR. Cattle did use the OSW, but not exclusively, as watering at the stream was still observed. The observed inconsistency in the effectiveness of the natural barriers on deterring cattle from the riparian area between periods and locations may be partly attributable to the environmental conditions present during this field trial as well as difference in pasture size and the ability of the established barriers to deter cattle from using the stream as a water source. Treatment had no significant effect (p > 0.05) on cow and calf weights averaged over the summer period. These results indicate that the presence of an OSW does not create significant differences in animal performance when used in extensive pasture scenarios such as those studied within the present study. Whereas the barriers did not consistently discourage watering at the stream, the results provide some indication of the efficacy of the OSW as well as the natural barriers on deterring cattle from the riparian area.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Average weights of calves and cows at the Killarney and Souris sites.
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animals-04-00670-f006: Average weights of calves and cows at the Killarney and Souris sites.

Mentions: The initial weight of the calves and cows recorded on P1-D1 was used as a reference for treatment differences in subsequent periods, as treatment effects, if important, should appear over time. Treatment differences at the end of the first and second period were compared to differences present at the beginning of the first period (which may be present as a result of random chance). There was no change in weight gain in 2BARR calves from P1-D1 to P2-D1 (p = 0.4042) compared to weight change realized by 1CONT calves at the Killarney site (Table 6). However, significant weight change (p = 0.0242) amongst 2BARR calves did occur from P3-D1 relative to P1-D1, with lower weight gain in 2BARR compared to 1CONT calves (Figure 6).


Off-Stream Watering Systems and Partial Barriers as a Strategy to Maximize Cattle Production and Minimize Time Spent in the Riparian Area.

Rawluk AA, Crow G, Legesse G, Veira DM, Bullock PR, González LA, Dubois M, Ominski KH - Animals (Basel) (2014)

Average weights of calves and cows at the Killarney and Souris sites.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494426&req=5

animals-04-00670-f006: Average weights of calves and cows at the Killarney and Souris sites.
Mentions: The initial weight of the calves and cows recorded on P1-D1 was used as a reference for treatment differences in subsequent periods, as treatment effects, if important, should appear over time. Treatment differences at the end of the first and second period were compared to differences present at the beginning of the first period (which may be present as a result of random chance). There was no change in weight gain in 2BARR calves from P1-D1 to P2-D1 (p = 0.4042) compared to weight change realized by 1CONT calves at the Killarney site (Table 6). However, significant weight change (p = 0.0242) amongst 2BARR calves did occur from P3-D1 relative to P1-D1, with lower weight gain in 2BARR compared to 1CONT calves (Figure 6).

Bottom Line: Cattle in 2BARR at the Souris site spent more time in the RP in Period 1 (p < 0.0001) and less time in Period 2 (p = 0.0002) compared to cattle in 3NOBARR.These results indicate that the presence of an OSW does not create significant differences in animal performance when used in extensive pasture scenarios such as those studied within the present study.Whereas the barriers did not consistently discourage watering at the stream, the results provide some indication of the efficacy of the OSW as well as the natural barriers on deterring cattle from the riparian area.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ducks Unlimited Canada, Calgary, T2Z 3V6, Canada. a_rawluk@ducks.ca.

ABSTRACT
A study was conducted in 2009 at two locations in Manitoba (Killarney and Souris), Canada to determine the impact of off-stream waterers (OSW) with or without natural barriers on (i) amount of time cattle spent in the 10 m buffer created within the riparian area, referred to as the riparian polygon (RP), (ii) watering location (OSW or stream), and (iii) animal performance measured as weight gain. This study was divided into three 28-day periods over the grazing season. At each location, the pasture-which ranged from 21.0 ha to 39.2 ha in size-was divided into three treatments: no OSW nor barriers (1CONT), OSW with barriers along the stream bank to deter cattle from watering at the stream (2BARR), and OSW without barriers (3NOBARR). Cattle in 2BARR spent less time in the RP in Periods 1 (p = 0.0002), 2 (p = 0.1116), and 3 (p < 0.0001) at the Killarney site compared to cattle in 3NOBARR at the same site. Cattle in 2BARR at the Souris site spent more time in the RP in Period 1 (p < 0.0001) and less time in Period 2 (p = 0.0002) compared to cattle in 3NOBARR. Cattle did use the OSW, but not exclusively, as watering at the stream was still observed. The observed inconsistency in the effectiveness of the natural barriers on deterring cattle from the riparian area between periods and locations may be partly attributable to the environmental conditions present during this field trial as well as difference in pasture size and the ability of the established barriers to deter cattle from using the stream as a water source. Treatment had no significant effect (p > 0.05) on cow and calf weights averaged over the summer period. These results indicate that the presence of an OSW does not create significant differences in animal performance when used in extensive pasture scenarios such as those studied within the present study. Whereas the barriers did not consistently discourage watering at the stream, the results provide some indication of the efficacy of the OSW as well as the natural barriers on deterring cattle from the riparian area.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus