Limits...
Off-Stream Watering Systems and Partial Barriers as a Strategy to Maximize Cattle Production and Minimize Time Spent in the Riparian Area.

Rawluk AA, Crow G, Legesse G, Veira DM, Bullock PR, González LA, Dubois M, Ominski KH - Animals (Basel) (2014)

Bottom Line: Cattle in 2BARR at the Souris site spent more time in the RP in Period 1 (p < 0.0001) and less time in Period 2 (p = 0.0002) compared to cattle in 3NOBARR.These results indicate that the presence of an OSW does not create significant differences in animal performance when used in extensive pasture scenarios such as those studied within the present study.Whereas the barriers did not consistently discourage watering at the stream, the results provide some indication of the efficacy of the OSW as well as the natural barriers on deterring cattle from the riparian area.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ducks Unlimited Canada, Calgary, T2Z 3V6, Canada. a_rawluk@ducks.ca.

ABSTRACT
A study was conducted in 2009 at two locations in Manitoba (Killarney and Souris), Canada to determine the impact of off-stream waterers (OSW) with or without natural barriers on (i) amount of time cattle spent in the 10 m buffer created within the riparian area, referred to as the riparian polygon (RP), (ii) watering location (OSW or stream), and (iii) animal performance measured as weight gain. This study was divided into three 28-day periods over the grazing season. At each location, the pasture-which ranged from 21.0 ha to 39.2 ha in size-was divided into three treatments: no OSW nor barriers (1CONT), OSW with barriers along the stream bank to deter cattle from watering at the stream (2BARR), and OSW without barriers (3NOBARR). Cattle in 2BARR spent less time in the RP in Periods 1 (p = 0.0002), 2 (p = 0.1116), and 3 (p < 0.0001) at the Killarney site compared to cattle in 3NOBARR at the same site. Cattle in 2BARR at the Souris site spent more time in the RP in Period 1 (p < 0.0001) and less time in Period 2 (p = 0.0002) compared to cattle in 3NOBARR. Cattle did use the OSW, but not exclusively, as watering at the stream was still observed. The observed inconsistency in the effectiveness of the natural barriers on deterring cattle from the riparian area between periods and locations may be partly attributable to the environmental conditions present during this field trial as well as difference in pasture size and the ability of the established barriers to deter cattle from using the stream as a water source. Treatment had no significant effect (p > 0.05) on cow and calf weights averaged over the summer period. These results indicate that the presence of an OSW does not create significant differences in animal performance when used in extensive pasture scenarios such as those studied within the present study. Whereas the barriers did not consistently discourage watering at the stream, the results provide some indication of the efficacy of the OSW as well as the natural barriers on deterring cattle from the riparian area.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Example of a natural barrier constructed from deadfall (fallen trees and branches) placed at common watering and crossing locations in 2BARR.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494426&req=5

animals-04-00670-f002: Example of a natural barrier constructed from deadfall (fallen trees and branches) placed at common watering and crossing locations in 2BARR.

Mentions: In 2BARR, natural barriers, which consisted of deadfall (i.e., fallen trees and branches; Figure 2) from the pasture, were placed across common watering and crossing areas on the north side of the stream. The intent was not to completely exclude cattle from the riparian area, but rather to encourage use of the watering system. Location of the barriers was determined before cattle were turned out at the beginning of the grazing season. Two established crossing points were left without barriers to allow access to the pasture on the south side of the stream. The riparian area was not fenced and the size of the stream was such that the cows were able to cross from one side to the other. The barriers were monitored throughout the season for evidence of hoof imprints or bare ground, and reinforced as required. New barriers were established if cattle appeared to be watering or crossing at new locations along the stream.


Off-Stream Watering Systems and Partial Barriers as a Strategy to Maximize Cattle Production and Minimize Time Spent in the Riparian Area.

Rawluk AA, Crow G, Legesse G, Veira DM, Bullock PR, González LA, Dubois M, Ominski KH - Animals (Basel) (2014)

Example of a natural barrier constructed from deadfall (fallen trees and branches) placed at common watering and crossing locations in 2BARR.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494426&req=5

animals-04-00670-f002: Example of a natural barrier constructed from deadfall (fallen trees and branches) placed at common watering and crossing locations in 2BARR.
Mentions: In 2BARR, natural barriers, which consisted of deadfall (i.e., fallen trees and branches; Figure 2) from the pasture, were placed across common watering and crossing areas on the north side of the stream. The intent was not to completely exclude cattle from the riparian area, but rather to encourage use of the watering system. Location of the barriers was determined before cattle were turned out at the beginning of the grazing season. Two established crossing points were left without barriers to allow access to the pasture on the south side of the stream. The riparian area was not fenced and the size of the stream was such that the cows were able to cross from one side to the other. The barriers were monitored throughout the season for evidence of hoof imprints or bare ground, and reinforced as required. New barriers were established if cattle appeared to be watering or crossing at new locations along the stream.

Bottom Line: Cattle in 2BARR at the Souris site spent more time in the RP in Period 1 (p < 0.0001) and less time in Period 2 (p = 0.0002) compared to cattle in 3NOBARR.These results indicate that the presence of an OSW does not create significant differences in animal performance when used in extensive pasture scenarios such as those studied within the present study.Whereas the barriers did not consistently discourage watering at the stream, the results provide some indication of the efficacy of the OSW as well as the natural barriers on deterring cattle from the riparian area.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ducks Unlimited Canada, Calgary, T2Z 3V6, Canada. a_rawluk@ducks.ca.

ABSTRACT
A study was conducted in 2009 at two locations in Manitoba (Killarney and Souris), Canada to determine the impact of off-stream waterers (OSW) with or without natural barriers on (i) amount of time cattle spent in the 10 m buffer created within the riparian area, referred to as the riparian polygon (RP), (ii) watering location (OSW or stream), and (iii) animal performance measured as weight gain. This study was divided into three 28-day periods over the grazing season. At each location, the pasture-which ranged from 21.0 ha to 39.2 ha in size-was divided into three treatments: no OSW nor barriers (1CONT), OSW with barriers along the stream bank to deter cattle from watering at the stream (2BARR), and OSW without barriers (3NOBARR). Cattle in 2BARR spent less time in the RP in Periods 1 (p = 0.0002), 2 (p = 0.1116), and 3 (p < 0.0001) at the Killarney site compared to cattle in 3NOBARR at the same site. Cattle in 2BARR at the Souris site spent more time in the RP in Period 1 (p < 0.0001) and less time in Period 2 (p = 0.0002) compared to cattle in 3NOBARR. Cattle did use the OSW, but not exclusively, as watering at the stream was still observed. The observed inconsistency in the effectiveness of the natural barriers on deterring cattle from the riparian area between periods and locations may be partly attributable to the environmental conditions present during this field trial as well as difference in pasture size and the ability of the established barriers to deter cattle from using the stream as a water source. Treatment had no significant effect (p > 0.05) on cow and calf weights averaged over the summer period. These results indicate that the presence of an OSW does not create significant differences in animal performance when used in extensive pasture scenarios such as those studied within the present study. Whereas the barriers did not consistently discourage watering at the stream, the results provide some indication of the efficacy of the OSW as well as the natural barriers on deterring cattle from the riparian area.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus