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Tourists' Perceptions of the Free-Roaming Dog Population in Samoa.

Beckman M, Hill KE, Farnworth MJ, Bolwell CF, Bridges J, Acke E - Animals (Basel) (2014)

Bottom Line: Questionnaires were administered to 281 tourists across Samoa over 5 weeks.Respondents showed strong support for humane population management.It also provides information complementing an earlier study of the attitudes of local Samoans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Domestic Animal Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7054, Uppsala 75007, Sweden. magnus_beckman@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT
A study was undertaken to establish how visiting tourists to Samoa perceived free-roaming dogs (Canis familiaris) and their management, additionally some factors that influence their perceptions were assessed. Questionnaires were administered to 281 tourists across Samoa over 5 weeks. Free-roaming dogs were seen by 98.2% (n = 269/274) of respondents, with 64.9% (n = 137/211) reporting that their presence had a negative effect on overall holiday experience. Respondents staying in the Apia (capital city) area were more likely to consider dogs a problem (p < 0.0001), and there was a significant association between whether the respondent owned a dog and if they thought dogs were a nuisance in Samoa (p < 0.003). Forty-four percent (20/89) of non-dog owners agreed that dogs were a nuisance compared to 22% (80/182) of dog owners. The majority felt that dogs required better control and management in Samoa (81%, n = 222) and that there were too many "stray" dogs (67.9%, n = 188). More respondents were negatively affected by the dogs' presence (64.9%, 137/211), and felt that the dogs made their holiday worse, than respondents that felt the dogs' presence improved their holiday experience (35.1%, 74/211). Most respondents stated that the dogs had a low impact (one to three; 68%, 187/275) on their stay in Samoa, whilst 24% (65/275) and 8% (23/275) stated they had a medium or high impact, respectively, on their stay. Respondents showed strong support for humane population management. Free-roaming dogs present a complex problem for Samoa and for its tourism industry in particular. The findings of this study further support the need for more discussion and action about the provision of veterinary services and population management for dogs in Samoa. It also provides information complementing an earlier study of the attitudes of local Samoans.

No MeSH data available.


Opinions on dogs in general and in Samoa as stated by 281 respondents of a questionnaire on tourist attitudes, experiences and behavior around Samoan dogs. The percentage (%) of tourists’ responses for each category is shown on the y-axis and the questions on the x-axis.
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animals-04-00599-f001: Opinions on dogs in general and in Samoa as stated by 281 respondents of a questionnaire on tourist attitudes, experiences and behavior around Samoan dogs. The percentage (%) of tourists’ responses for each category is shown on the y-axis and the questions on the x-axis.

Mentions: The majority of respondents felt that dogs required better control and management in Samoa (Figure 1) and that there were too many “stray” dogs. There was a significant association between whether the respondent owned a dog and if they thought dogs were a nuisance in Samoa (p < 0.003, Cramer’s V = 0.23); 44% (20/89) of non-dog owners agreed that dogs were a nuisance compared to 22% (80/182) of dog owners. There was no effect of gender or length of stay on whether dogs were considered a nuisance in Samoa (p = 0.75, Cramer’s V = 0.08; p = 0.10, Cramer’s V = 0.10, respectively). There was no effect of gender (p = 0.92, Cramer’s V = 0.04), length of stay (p = 0.64, Cramer’s V = 0.10) or dog ownership (p = 0.88, Cramer’s V = 0.06) on whether respondents thought dogs required better management in Samoa. There was no effect of gender or dog ownership on whether respondents thought violence against dogs was unacceptable (p = 0.05, Cramer’s V = 0.16; p = 0.50, Cramer’s V = 0.09 respectively).


Tourists' Perceptions of the Free-Roaming Dog Population in Samoa.

Beckman M, Hill KE, Farnworth MJ, Bolwell CF, Bridges J, Acke E - Animals (Basel) (2014)

Opinions on dogs in general and in Samoa as stated by 281 respondents of a questionnaire on tourist attitudes, experiences and behavior around Samoan dogs. The percentage (%) of tourists’ responses for each category is shown on the y-axis and the questions on the x-axis.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494425&req=5

animals-04-00599-f001: Opinions on dogs in general and in Samoa as stated by 281 respondents of a questionnaire on tourist attitudes, experiences and behavior around Samoan dogs. The percentage (%) of tourists’ responses for each category is shown on the y-axis and the questions on the x-axis.
Mentions: The majority of respondents felt that dogs required better control and management in Samoa (Figure 1) and that there were too many “stray” dogs. There was a significant association between whether the respondent owned a dog and if they thought dogs were a nuisance in Samoa (p < 0.003, Cramer’s V = 0.23); 44% (20/89) of non-dog owners agreed that dogs were a nuisance compared to 22% (80/182) of dog owners. There was no effect of gender or length of stay on whether dogs were considered a nuisance in Samoa (p = 0.75, Cramer’s V = 0.08; p = 0.10, Cramer’s V = 0.10, respectively). There was no effect of gender (p = 0.92, Cramer’s V = 0.04), length of stay (p = 0.64, Cramer’s V = 0.10) or dog ownership (p = 0.88, Cramer’s V = 0.06) on whether respondents thought dogs required better management in Samoa. There was no effect of gender or dog ownership on whether respondents thought violence against dogs was unacceptable (p = 0.05, Cramer’s V = 0.16; p = 0.50, Cramer’s V = 0.09 respectively).

Bottom Line: Questionnaires were administered to 281 tourists across Samoa over 5 weeks.Respondents showed strong support for humane population management.It also provides information complementing an earlier study of the attitudes of local Samoans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Domestic Animal Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7054, Uppsala 75007, Sweden. magnus_beckman@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT
A study was undertaken to establish how visiting tourists to Samoa perceived free-roaming dogs (Canis familiaris) and their management, additionally some factors that influence their perceptions were assessed. Questionnaires were administered to 281 tourists across Samoa over 5 weeks. Free-roaming dogs were seen by 98.2% (n = 269/274) of respondents, with 64.9% (n = 137/211) reporting that their presence had a negative effect on overall holiday experience. Respondents staying in the Apia (capital city) area were more likely to consider dogs a problem (p < 0.0001), and there was a significant association between whether the respondent owned a dog and if they thought dogs were a nuisance in Samoa (p < 0.003). Forty-four percent (20/89) of non-dog owners agreed that dogs were a nuisance compared to 22% (80/182) of dog owners. The majority felt that dogs required better control and management in Samoa (81%, n = 222) and that there were too many "stray" dogs (67.9%, n = 188). More respondents were negatively affected by the dogs' presence (64.9%, 137/211), and felt that the dogs made their holiday worse, than respondents that felt the dogs' presence improved their holiday experience (35.1%, 74/211). Most respondents stated that the dogs had a low impact (one to three; 68%, 187/275) on their stay in Samoa, whilst 24% (65/275) and 8% (23/275) stated they had a medium or high impact, respectively, on their stay. Respondents showed strong support for humane population management. Free-roaming dogs present a complex problem for Samoa and for its tourism industry in particular. The findings of this study further support the need for more discussion and action about the provision of veterinary services and population management for dogs in Samoa. It also provides information complementing an earlier study of the attitudes of local Samoans.

No MeSH data available.