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Effects of Transfer from Breeding to Research Facility on the Welfare of Rats.

Arts JW, Oosterhuis NR, Kramer K, Ohl F - Animals (Basel) (2014)

Bottom Line: Transfer from the breeding facility to a research facility is a stressful event for laboratory animals.This study measured ambient and body temperature, corticosterone and glucose levels, body weight, behavior and water and food intake before, during and after transfer in Wistar rats.Male rats need to habituate for at least one week, females for two weeks after transfer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Animals in Science & Society, Division of Animal Welfare & Laboratory Animal Science, Veterinary Faculty, Utrecht University, Utrecht, 3584 CM, The Netherlands. jarts@harlan.com.

ABSTRACT
Transfer from the breeding facility to a research facility is a stressful event for laboratory animals. Heat stress has been reported to constitute one of the major concerns during transport of animals. This study measured ambient and body temperature, corticosterone and glucose levels, body weight, behavior and water and food intake before, during and after transfer in Wistar rats. Decreased body weight, water and food intake were observed on the day of transfer in rats. Environmental temperature strongly affected body temperature of rats and needs to be controlled. Male rats need to habituate for at least one week, females for two weeks after transfer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Body Weight (gram ± standard deviation (SD)) in male (squares) and female (circles), transferred (black symbols-solid line) and control (white symbols-dotted line) rats, 7 days before (DBT) until 23 days after (DAT) transfer (n = 8). * indicates significant different growth between transferred (TF) and control (CO) individuals.
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animals-04-00712-f001: Body Weight (gram ± standard deviation (SD)) in male (squares) and female (circles), transferred (black symbols-solid line) and control (white symbols-dotted line) rats, 7 days before (DBT) until 23 days after (DAT) transfer (n = 8). * indicates significant different growth between transferred (TF) and control (CO) individuals.

Mentions: There was a sex effect on bodyweight (M > F, F(1,28) = 540.0, p < 0.001) (Figure 1). Transfer resulted in a decrease in BW of transferred animals compared to the control animals. This difference was significant at day of transfer (male: t(14) = −2.63, p = 0.020, female: t(14) = −2.68, p = 0.018). One day after transfer this decrease was no longer significant. In the week before transfer, males increased in weight 7.1 ± 1.5 g/day. On the day of transfer they lost on average 6.2 ± 3.8 g (=3.2%), followed by an increased bodyweight gain of 11.8 ± 4.7 g the day after transfer. Females increased in weight the week before transfer 4.3 ± 1.4 g/day. On the day of transfer they lost on average 5.8 ± 2.6 g (=3.8%), followed by an increased bodyweight gain of 8.7 ± 3.8 g the day after transfer.


Effects of Transfer from Breeding to Research Facility on the Welfare of Rats.

Arts JW, Oosterhuis NR, Kramer K, Ohl F - Animals (Basel) (2014)

Body Weight (gram ± standard deviation (SD)) in male (squares) and female (circles), transferred (black symbols-solid line) and control (white symbols-dotted line) rats, 7 days before (DBT) until 23 days after (DAT) transfer (n = 8). * indicates significant different growth between transferred (TF) and control (CO) individuals.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494421&req=5

animals-04-00712-f001: Body Weight (gram ± standard deviation (SD)) in male (squares) and female (circles), transferred (black symbols-solid line) and control (white symbols-dotted line) rats, 7 days before (DBT) until 23 days after (DAT) transfer (n = 8). * indicates significant different growth between transferred (TF) and control (CO) individuals.
Mentions: There was a sex effect on bodyweight (M > F, F(1,28) = 540.0, p < 0.001) (Figure 1). Transfer resulted in a decrease in BW of transferred animals compared to the control animals. This difference was significant at day of transfer (male: t(14) = −2.63, p = 0.020, female: t(14) = −2.68, p = 0.018). One day after transfer this decrease was no longer significant. In the week before transfer, males increased in weight 7.1 ± 1.5 g/day. On the day of transfer they lost on average 6.2 ± 3.8 g (=3.2%), followed by an increased bodyweight gain of 11.8 ± 4.7 g the day after transfer. Females increased in weight the week before transfer 4.3 ± 1.4 g/day. On the day of transfer they lost on average 5.8 ± 2.6 g (=3.8%), followed by an increased bodyweight gain of 8.7 ± 3.8 g the day after transfer.

Bottom Line: Transfer from the breeding facility to a research facility is a stressful event for laboratory animals.This study measured ambient and body temperature, corticosterone and glucose levels, body weight, behavior and water and food intake before, during and after transfer in Wistar rats.Male rats need to habituate for at least one week, females for two weeks after transfer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Animals in Science & Society, Division of Animal Welfare & Laboratory Animal Science, Veterinary Faculty, Utrecht University, Utrecht, 3584 CM, The Netherlands. jarts@harlan.com.

ABSTRACT
Transfer from the breeding facility to a research facility is a stressful event for laboratory animals. Heat stress has been reported to constitute one of the major concerns during transport of animals. This study measured ambient and body temperature, corticosterone and glucose levels, body weight, behavior and water and food intake before, during and after transfer in Wistar rats. Decreased body weight, water and food intake were observed on the day of transfer in rats. Environmental temperature strongly affected body temperature of rats and needs to be controlled. Male rats need to habituate for at least one week, females for two weeks after transfer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus