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Determinants of Cat Choice and Outcomes for Adult Cats and Kittens Adopted from an Australian Animal Shelter.

Zito S, Paterson M, Vankan D, Morton J, Bennett P, Phillips C - Animals (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: One such strategy is to discount adoption prices, but there are concerns that this may result in poor adoption outcomes.Most adopters had benevolent motivations for adopting from the shelter and had put considerable thought into the adoption and requirements for responsible ownership.However, adult cat adopters were more likely to have been influenced by price than kitten adopters.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Animal Welfare and Ethics, School of Veterinary Science, University of Queensland, Gatton Campus, Gatton, QLD 4343, Australia. s.zito@uq.edu.au.

ABSTRACT
The percentage of adult cats euthanized in animal shelters is greater than that of kittens because adult cats are less likely to be adopted. This study aimed to provide evidence to inform the design of strategies to encourage adult cat adoptions. One such strategy is to discount adoption prices, but there are concerns that this may result in poor adoption outcomes. We surveyed 382 cat adopters at the time of adoption, to assess potential determinants of adopters' cat age group choice (adult or kitten) and, for adult cat adopters, the price they are willing to pay. The same respondents were surveyed again 6-12 months after the adoption to compare outcomes between cat age groups and between adult cats in two price categories. Most adopters had benevolent motivations for adopting from the shelter and had put considerable thought into the adoption and requirements for responsible ownership. However, adult cat adopters were more likely to have been influenced by price than kitten adopters. Adoption outcomes were generally positive for both adult cats and kittens and for adult cats adopted at low prices. The latter finding alleviates concerns about the outcomes of "low-cost" adoptions in populations, such as the study population, and lends support for the use of "low-cost" adoptions as an option for attempting to increase adoption rates. In addition, the results provide information that can be used to inform future campaigns aimed at increasing the number of adult cat adoptions, particularly in devising marketing strategies for adult cats.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Factors considered by adopters before adopting their study cat(s). Between 355 and 367 of the 382 study adopters answered each question. Each adopter was asked to rate whether they had considered each of these factors before adopting their study cat(s) from the animal shelter; those who answered somewhat or strongly agree were classified as having considered that factor before adopting.
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animals-05-00276-f001: Factors considered by adopters before adopting their study cat(s). Between 355 and 367 of the 382 study adopters answered each question. Each adopter was asked to rate whether they had considered each of these factors before adopting their study cat(s) from the animal shelter; those who answered somewhat or strongly agree were classified as having considered that factor before adopting.

Mentions: Most cats’ adopters had considered a range of factors related to the adoption (Table 1, Figure 1 and Table S2 and Table S3); the three most common were the suitability of their accommodation for a cat, preferred cat personality and their lifestyle.


Determinants of Cat Choice and Outcomes for Adult Cats and Kittens Adopted from an Australian Animal Shelter.

Zito S, Paterson M, Vankan D, Morton J, Bennett P, Phillips C - Animals (Basel) (2015)

Factors considered by adopters before adopting their study cat(s). Between 355 and 367 of the 382 study adopters answered each question. Each adopter was asked to rate whether they had considered each of these factors before adopting their study cat(s) from the animal shelter; those who answered somewhat or strongly agree were classified as having considered that factor before adopting.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494418&req=5

animals-05-00276-f001: Factors considered by adopters before adopting their study cat(s). Between 355 and 367 of the 382 study adopters answered each question. Each adopter was asked to rate whether they had considered each of these factors before adopting their study cat(s) from the animal shelter; those who answered somewhat or strongly agree were classified as having considered that factor before adopting.
Mentions: Most cats’ adopters had considered a range of factors related to the adoption (Table 1, Figure 1 and Table S2 and Table S3); the three most common were the suitability of their accommodation for a cat, preferred cat personality and their lifestyle.

Bottom Line: One such strategy is to discount adoption prices, but there are concerns that this may result in poor adoption outcomes.Most adopters had benevolent motivations for adopting from the shelter and had put considerable thought into the adoption and requirements for responsible ownership.However, adult cat adopters were more likely to have been influenced by price than kitten adopters.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Animal Welfare and Ethics, School of Veterinary Science, University of Queensland, Gatton Campus, Gatton, QLD 4343, Australia. s.zito@uq.edu.au.

ABSTRACT
The percentage of adult cats euthanized in animal shelters is greater than that of kittens because adult cats are less likely to be adopted. This study aimed to provide evidence to inform the design of strategies to encourage adult cat adoptions. One such strategy is to discount adoption prices, but there are concerns that this may result in poor adoption outcomes. We surveyed 382 cat adopters at the time of adoption, to assess potential determinants of adopters' cat age group choice (adult or kitten) and, for adult cat adopters, the price they are willing to pay. The same respondents were surveyed again 6-12 months after the adoption to compare outcomes between cat age groups and between adult cats in two price categories. Most adopters had benevolent motivations for adopting from the shelter and had put considerable thought into the adoption and requirements for responsible ownership. However, adult cat adopters were more likely to have been influenced by price than kitten adopters. Adoption outcomes were generally positive for both adult cats and kittens and for adult cats adopted at low prices. The latter finding alleviates concerns about the outcomes of "low-cost" adoptions in populations, such as the study population, and lends support for the use of "low-cost" adoptions as an option for attempting to increase adoption rates. In addition, the results provide information that can be used to inform future campaigns aimed at increasing the number of adult cat adoptions, particularly in devising marketing strategies for adult cats.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus