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Does the Naked Neck Meat Type Chicken Yield Lower Methionine Requirement Data?

Khan DR, Wecke C, Liebert F - Animals (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: Methionine (Met) requirement studies with homozygous (Na/Na) and heterozygous (Na/na) naked neck meat type chicken utilized 144 birds of average weight (50% each genotype and sex) within two N balance experiments involving both the starter (d10-20) and grower period (d25-35).In conclusion, the Met requirement of the naked neck chicken is not significantly different from its normally-feathered counterparts.In addition, the low feather production was not reflected by reduced requirement for Met in naked neck birds.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division Animal Nutrition Physiology, Department of Animal Sciences, Georg-August-University, Kellnerweg 6, 37077 Goettingen, Germany. dkhan@gwdg.de.

ABSTRACT
Methionine (Met) requirement studies with homozygous (Na/Na) and heterozygous (Na/na) naked neck meat type chicken utilized 144 birds of average weight (50% each genotype and sex) within two N balance experiments involving both the starter (d10-20) and grower period (d25-35). The birds were randomly allotted to five experimental diets with graded protein supply and Met as the limiting amino acid. The proportion of native feed protein sources (soy protein concentrate, maize, wheat, fishmeal and wheat gluten) was kept constant to ensure a uniform protein quality in all diets. The Met requirement depending on genotype, sex, age period and growth performance (protein deposition) was estimated using a non-linear modeling procedure of N utilization in monogastric animals. On average, 0.47% (Na/Na) and 0.45% (Na/na) dietary Met was established as adequate in the starter diet, as well as 0.37% (Na/Na) and 0.36% (Na/na) Met in the grower diet for both of the sexes. In conclusion, the Met requirement of the naked neck chicken is not significantly different from its normally-feathered counterparts. In addition, the low feather production was not reflected by reduced requirement for Met in naked neck birds. However, these conclusions are valid only at the given Met:Cys ratio (1:1) in the experimental diets.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Daily N deposition (ND), depending on Met intake (MetI) and age period of male naked neck chickens. NRmaxT = theoretical maximum for daily N retention (mg/BWkg0.67); e = basic number of natural logarithm; bc−1 = efficiency of Met utilization; NMR = daily N maintenance requirement (mg/BWkg0.67).
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animals-05-00151-f001: Daily N deposition (ND), depending on Met intake (MetI) and age period of male naked neck chickens. NRmaxT = theoretical maximum for daily N retention (mg/BWkg0.67); e = basic number of natural logarithm; bc−1 = efficiency of Met utilization; NMR = daily N maintenance requirement (mg/BWkg0.67).

Mentions: Figure 1 summarizes the observed Met response curves for male chickens of both genotypes and age periods under study.


Does the Naked Neck Meat Type Chicken Yield Lower Methionine Requirement Data?

Khan DR, Wecke C, Liebert F - Animals (Basel) (2015)

Daily N deposition (ND), depending on Met intake (MetI) and age period of male naked neck chickens. NRmaxT = theoretical maximum for daily N retention (mg/BWkg0.67); e = basic number of natural logarithm; bc−1 = efficiency of Met utilization; NMR = daily N maintenance requirement (mg/BWkg0.67).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494416&req=5

animals-05-00151-f001: Daily N deposition (ND), depending on Met intake (MetI) and age period of male naked neck chickens. NRmaxT = theoretical maximum for daily N retention (mg/BWkg0.67); e = basic number of natural logarithm; bc−1 = efficiency of Met utilization; NMR = daily N maintenance requirement (mg/BWkg0.67).
Mentions: Figure 1 summarizes the observed Met response curves for male chickens of both genotypes and age periods under study.

Bottom Line: Methionine (Met) requirement studies with homozygous (Na/Na) and heterozygous (Na/na) naked neck meat type chicken utilized 144 birds of average weight (50% each genotype and sex) within two N balance experiments involving both the starter (d10-20) and grower period (d25-35).In conclusion, the Met requirement of the naked neck chicken is not significantly different from its normally-feathered counterparts.In addition, the low feather production was not reflected by reduced requirement for Met in naked neck birds.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division Animal Nutrition Physiology, Department of Animal Sciences, Georg-August-University, Kellnerweg 6, 37077 Goettingen, Germany. dkhan@gwdg.de.

ABSTRACT
Methionine (Met) requirement studies with homozygous (Na/Na) and heterozygous (Na/na) naked neck meat type chicken utilized 144 birds of average weight (50% each genotype and sex) within two N balance experiments involving both the starter (d10-20) and grower period (d25-35). The birds were randomly allotted to five experimental diets with graded protein supply and Met as the limiting amino acid. The proportion of native feed protein sources (soy protein concentrate, maize, wheat, fishmeal and wheat gluten) was kept constant to ensure a uniform protein quality in all diets. The Met requirement depending on genotype, sex, age period and growth performance (protein deposition) was estimated using a non-linear modeling procedure of N utilization in monogastric animals. On average, 0.47% (Na/Na) and 0.45% (Na/na) dietary Met was established as adequate in the starter diet, as well as 0.37% (Na/Na) and 0.36% (Na/na) Met in the grower diet for both of the sexes. In conclusion, the Met requirement of the naked neck chicken is not significantly different from its normally-feathered counterparts. In addition, the low feather production was not reflected by reduced requirement for Met in naked neck birds. However, these conclusions are valid only at the given Met:Cys ratio (1:1) in the experimental diets.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus