Limits...
A Critical Look at Biomedical Journals' Policies on Animal Research by Use of a Novel Tool: The EXEMPLAR Scale.

Martins AR, Franco NH - Animals (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: For editorial policies to meaningfully impact attitudes and practice, they must not only be put into effect by editors and reviewers, but also be set to high standards.Results show a much greater focus of editorial policies on regulatory compliance than on other domains, suggesting a transfer of journals' responsibilities to scientists, institutions and regulators.Scores were not found to vary with journals' impact factor, country of origin or antiquity, but were, however, significantly higher for open access journals, which may be a result of their greater exposure and consequent higher public scrutiny.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Sciences, University of Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre S/N, 4169-007 Porto, Portugal. up201101588@fc.up.pt.

ABSTRACT
Animal research is not only regulated by legislation but also by self-regulatory mechanisms within the scientific community, which include biomedical journals' policies on animal use. For editorial policies to meaningfully impact attitudes and practice, they must not only be put into effect by editors and reviewers, but also be set to high standards. We present a novel tool to classify journals' policies on animal use-the EXEMPLAR scale-as well as an analysis by this scale of 170 journals publishing studies on animal models of three human diseases: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Type-1 Diabetes and Tuberculosis. Results show a much greater focus of editorial policies on regulatory compliance than on other domains, suggesting a transfer of journals' responsibilities to scientists, institutions and regulators. Scores were not found to vary with journals' impact factor, country of origin or antiquity, but were, however, significantly higher for open access journals, which may be a result of their greater exposure and consequent higher public scrutiny.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic representation of the search and selection process, with the search for journals publishing studies on Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) being presented as an example. One of the journals from the T1D sample was later excluded because their editorial polices stated that it did not publish studies on animal models, leaving a final sample size of 44 journals.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494415&req=5

animals-05-00315-f001: Schematic representation of the search and selection process, with the search for journals publishing studies on Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) being presented as an example. One of the journals from the T1D sample was later excluded because their editorial polices stated that it did not publish studies on animal models, leaving a final sample size of 44 journals.

Mentions: A list of papers reporting studies on murine models of Type-1 Diabetes (T1D), Tuberculosis (TB) and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) published between 2011 and 2013 was retrieved by a ISI Web of Science™ (Core Collection v5.13.1) advanced search. The search was carried out in April 2014 using the queries TS= ((“NOD mouse” OR “NOD mice” OR “non obese diabetic” OR “nonobese diabetic”) AND diabet*); TS = ((mice OR mouse) AND tuberculosis); and TS = ((mice OR mouse) SAME (ALS OR “amyotrophic lateral sclerosis”)). The results were refined to only include articles in English reporting original research, and afterwards downloaded and archived as an ENDNOTE® database. After being refined, search results were as such: T1D: 655 papers; TB: 1107 papers; ALS: 1114 papers. The criterion for selecting which journals to classify was to only include those that had published three or more papers in each field over the time period selected (Figure 1). This resulted in a sample of 44 journals for T1D (which published 475/655, or 73%, of T1D papers retrieved); 65 journals for TB (which published 999/1107, or 72% of all TB papers retrieved) and 84 journals for ALS (which published 830/1114, or 75%, of all ALS papers retrieved).


A Critical Look at Biomedical Journals' Policies on Animal Research by Use of a Novel Tool: The EXEMPLAR Scale.

Martins AR, Franco NH - Animals (Basel) (2015)

Schematic representation of the search and selection process, with the search for journals publishing studies on Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) being presented as an example. One of the journals from the T1D sample was later excluded because their editorial polices stated that it did not publish studies on animal models, leaving a final sample size of 44 journals.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494415&req=5

animals-05-00315-f001: Schematic representation of the search and selection process, with the search for journals publishing studies on Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) being presented as an example. One of the journals from the T1D sample was later excluded because their editorial polices stated that it did not publish studies on animal models, leaving a final sample size of 44 journals.
Mentions: A list of papers reporting studies on murine models of Type-1 Diabetes (T1D), Tuberculosis (TB) and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) published between 2011 and 2013 was retrieved by a ISI Web of Science™ (Core Collection v5.13.1) advanced search. The search was carried out in April 2014 using the queries TS= ((“NOD mouse” OR “NOD mice” OR “non obese diabetic” OR “nonobese diabetic”) AND diabet*); TS = ((mice OR mouse) AND tuberculosis); and TS = ((mice OR mouse) SAME (ALS OR “amyotrophic lateral sclerosis”)). The results were refined to only include articles in English reporting original research, and afterwards downloaded and archived as an ENDNOTE® database. After being refined, search results were as such: T1D: 655 papers; TB: 1107 papers; ALS: 1114 papers. The criterion for selecting which journals to classify was to only include those that had published three or more papers in each field over the time period selected (Figure 1). This resulted in a sample of 44 journals for T1D (which published 475/655, or 73%, of T1D papers retrieved); 65 journals for TB (which published 999/1107, or 72% of all TB papers retrieved) and 84 journals for ALS (which published 830/1114, or 75%, of all ALS papers retrieved).

Bottom Line: For editorial policies to meaningfully impact attitudes and practice, they must not only be put into effect by editors and reviewers, but also be set to high standards.Results show a much greater focus of editorial policies on regulatory compliance than on other domains, suggesting a transfer of journals' responsibilities to scientists, institutions and regulators.Scores were not found to vary with journals' impact factor, country of origin or antiquity, but were, however, significantly higher for open access journals, which may be a result of their greater exposure and consequent higher public scrutiny.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Sciences, University of Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre S/N, 4169-007 Porto, Portugal. up201101588@fc.up.pt.

ABSTRACT
Animal research is not only regulated by legislation but also by self-regulatory mechanisms within the scientific community, which include biomedical journals' policies on animal use. For editorial policies to meaningfully impact attitudes and practice, they must not only be put into effect by editors and reviewers, but also be set to high standards. We present a novel tool to classify journals' policies on animal use-the EXEMPLAR scale-as well as an analysis by this scale of 170 journals publishing studies on animal models of three human diseases: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Type-1 Diabetes and Tuberculosis. Results show a much greater focus of editorial policies on regulatory compliance than on other domains, suggesting a transfer of journals' responsibilities to scientists, institutions and regulators. Scores were not found to vary with journals' impact factor, country of origin or antiquity, but were, however, significantly higher for open access journals, which may be a result of their greater exposure and consequent higher public scrutiny.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus