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2004 Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Manure Management in South Africa.

Moeletsi ME, Tongwane MI - Animals (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: Manure management in livestock makes a significant contribution towards greenhouse gas emissions in the Agriculture; Forestry and Other Land Use category in South Africa.The results show relatively high methane emissions factors from manure management for mature female dairy cattle (40.98 kg/year/animal), sows (25.23 kg/year/animal) and boars (25.23 kg/year/animal).Mitigation options from manure management must be taken with care due to divergent conducive requirements of methane and nitrous oxide emissions requirements.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: ARC-Institute for Soil, Climate and Water, Private Bag X79, Pretoria 0001, South Africa. moeletsim@arc.agric.za.

ABSTRACT
Manure management in livestock makes a significant contribution towards greenhouse gas emissions in the Agriculture; Forestry and Other Land Use category in South Africa. Methane and nitrous oxide emissions are prevalent in contrasting manure management systems; promoting anaerobic and aerobic conditions respectively. In this paper; both Tier 1 and modified Tier 2 approaches of the IPCC guidelines are utilized to estimate the emissions from South African livestock manure management. Activity data (animal population, animal weights, manure management systems, etc.) were sourced from various resources for estimation of both emissions factors and emissions of methane and nitrous oxide. The results show relatively high methane emissions factors from manure management for mature female dairy cattle (40.98 kg/year/animal), sows (25.23 kg/year/animal) and boars (25.23 kg/year/animal). Hence, contributions for pig farming and dairy cattle are the highest at 54.50 Gg and 32.01 Gg respectively, with total emissions of 134.97 Gg (3104 Gg CO₂ Equivalent). Total nitrous oxide emissions are estimated at 7.10 Gg (2272 Gg CO₂ Equivalent) and the three main contributors are commercial beef cattle; poultry and small-scale beef farming at 1.80 Gg; 1.72 Gg and 1.69 Gg respectively. Mitigation options from manure management must be taken with care due to divergent conducive requirements of methane and nitrous oxide emissions requirements.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

CH4 emissions from manure management per livestock category in 2004.
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animals-05-00193-f001: CH4 emissions from manure management per livestock category in 2004.

Mentions: Mature female dairy cows have the highest CH4 emissions factor with 40.98 kg/year (Table 5). This is followed by sows and boars both at 25.23 kg/year while the other animal sub-categories had emissions factors below 10 kg/year. The emissions factors calculated for sheep, goats, horses, donkeys and poultry are the same as those found in the IPCC guidelines default tables (IPCC, 2006). The total CH4 emissions from direct manure management are estimated at 134.97 Gg (3104 Gg CO2 Equivalent) (Table 5) with pig industry, dairy cattle and small-scale cattle farming showing the highest emissions of 54.5 Gg (40.4%), 32.01 Gg (23.7%) and 19.50 Gg (14.4%) respectively (Figure 1). These relatively high emissions are attributed to MMS which are perceived to be based on slurry, cattle bedding and lagoons. The lowest emissions are from poultry, donkeys and horses with less than 2.00 Gg each.


2004 Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Manure Management in South Africa.

Moeletsi ME, Tongwane MI - Animals (Basel) (2015)

CH4 emissions from manure management per livestock category in 2004.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494408&req=5

animals-05-00193-f001: CH4 emissions from manure management per livestock category in 2004.
Mentions: Mature female dairy cows have the highest CH4 emissions factor with 40.98 kg/year (Table 5). This is followed by sows and boars both at 25.23 kg/year while the other animal sub-categories had emissions factors below 10 kg/year. The emissions factors calculated for sheep, goats, horses, donkeys and poultry are the same as those found in the IPCC guidelines default tables (IPCC, 2006). The total CH4 emissions from direct manure management are estimated at 134.97 Gg (3104 Gg CO2 Equivalent) (Table 5) with pig industry, dairy cattle and small-scale cattle farming showing the highest emissions of 54.5 Gg (40.4%), 32.01 Gg (23.7%) and 19.50 Gg (14.4%) respectively (Figure 1). These relatively high emissions are attributed to MMS which are perceived to be based on slurry, cattle bedding and lagoons. The lowest emissions are from poultry, donkeys and horses with less than 2.00 Gg each.

Bottom Line: Manure management in livestock makes a significant contribution towards greenhouse gas emissions in the Agriculture; Forestry and Other Land Use category in South Africa.The results show relatively high methane emissions factors from manure management for mature female dairy cattle (40.98 kg/year/animal), sows (25.23 kg/year/animal) and boars (25.23 kg/year/animal).Mitigation options from manure management must be taken with care due to divergent conducive requirements of methane and nitrous oxide emissions requirements.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: ARC-Institute for Soil, Climate and Water, Private Bag X79, Pretoria 0001, South Africa. moeletsim@arc.agric.za.

ABSTRACT
Manure management in livestock makes a significant contribution towards greenhouse gas emissions in the Agriculture; Forestry and Other Land Use category in South Africa. Methane and nitrous oxide emissions are prevalent in contrasting manure management systems; promoting anaerobic and aerobic conditions respectively. In this paper; both Tier 1 and modified Tier 2 approaches of the IPCC guidelines are utilized to estimate the emissions from South African livestock manure management. Activity data (animal population, animal weights, manure management systems, etc.) were sourced from various resources for estimation of both emissions factors and emissions of methane and nitrous oxide. The results show relatively high methane emissions factors from manure management for mature female dairy cattle (40.98 kg/year/animal), sows (25.23 kg/year/animal) and boars (25.23 kg/year/animal). Hence, contributions for pig farming and dairy cattle are the highest at 54.50 Gg and 32.01 Gg respectively, with total emissions of 134.97 Gg (3104 Gg CO₂ Equivalent). Total nitrous oxide emissions are estimated at 7.10 Gg (2272 Gg CO₂ Equivalent) and the three main contributors are commercial beef cattle; poultry and small-scale beef farming at 1.80 Gg; 1.72 Gg and 1.69 Gg respectively. Mitigation options from manure management must be taken with care due to divergent conducive requirements of methane and nitrous oxide emissions requirements.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus