Limits...
The Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine Shelter Program.

Bushby P, Woodruff K, Shivley J - Animals (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: Students spend five days at shelters in the junior year of the curriculum and two weeks working on mobile veterinary units in their senior year.The program helps meet accreditation standards of the American Veterinary Medical Association's Council on Education that require students to have hands-on experience and is in keeping with recommendations from the North American Veterinary Medical Education Consortium.The program responds, in part, to the challenge from the Pew Study on Future Directions for Veterinary Medicine that argued that veterinary students do not graduate with the level of knowledge and skills that is commensurate with the number of years of professional education.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, P.O. Box 6001, Mississippi State, MS 39762, USA. bushby@cvm.msstate.edu.

ABSTRACT
The shelter program at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine provides veterinary students with extensive experience in shelter animal care including spay/neuter, basic wellness care, diagnostics, medical management, disease control, shelter management and biosecurity. Students spend five days at shelters in the junior year of the curriculum and two weeks working on mobile veterinary units in their senior year. The program helps meet accreditation standards of the American Veterinary Medical Association's Council on Education that require students to have hands-on experience and is in keeping with recommendations from the North American Veterinary Medical Education Consortium. The program responds, in part, to the challenge from the Pew Study on Future Directions for Veterinary Medicine that argued that veterinary students do not graduate with the level of knowledge and skills that is commensurate with the number of years of professional education.

No MeSH data available.


Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine’s second mobile unit at a local animal shelter. Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine’s second mobile unit is a 38 ft gooseneck trailer equipped with three surgical tables for performing spays and neuters
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494407&req=5

animals-05-00259-f002: Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine’s second mobile unit at a local animal shelter. Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine’s second mobile unit is a 38 ft gooseneck trailer equipped with three surgical tables for performing spays and neuters

Mentions: The program still had limited enrollment during this period. Enrolling two students for 2-weeks at a time, 50 weeks of the year, kept enrollment at 50 students a year. Demand for the elective was great but with a class size of 80 to 85 students per year approximately 40% of each senior class was unable to enroll. Discontented with the situation, the freshmen Class of 2014 initiated a project to raise funds to purchase a second mobile unit. When PetSmart Charities heard of the students efforts they funded a grant to purchase a second mobile unit (See Figure 2).


The Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine Shelter Program.

Bushby P, Woodruff K, Shivley J - Animals (Basel) (2015)

Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine’s second mobile unit at a local animal shelter. Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine’s second mobile unit is a 38 ft gooseneck trailer equipped with three surgical tables for performing spays and neuters
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494407&req=5

animals-05-00259-f002: Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine’s second mobile unit at a local animal shelter. Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine’s second mobile unit is a 38 ft gooseneck trailer equipped with three surgical tables for performing spays and neuters
Mentions: The program still had limited enrollment during this period. Enrolling two students for 2-weeks at a time, 50 weeks of the year, kept enrollment at 50 students a year. Demand for the elective was great but with a class size of 80 to 85 students per year approximately 40% of each senior class was unable to enroll. Discontented with the situation, the freshmen Class of 2014 initiated a project to raise funds to purchase a second mobile unit. When PetSmart Charities heard of the students efforts they funded a grant to purchase a second mobile unit (See Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Students spend five days at shelters in the junior year of the curriculum and two weeks working on mobile veterinary units in their senior year.The program helps meet accreditation standards of the American Veterinary Medical Association's Council on Education that require students to have hands-on experience and is in keeping with recommendations from the North American Veterinary Medical Education Consortium.The program responds, in part, to the challenge from the Pew Study on Future Directions for Veterinary Medicine that argued that veterinary students do not graduate with the level of knowledge and skills that is commensurate with the number of years of professional education.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, P.O. Box 6001, Mississippi State, MS 39762, USA. bushby@cvm.msstate.edu.

ABSTRACT
The shelter program at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine provides veterinary students with extensive experience in shelter animal care including spay/neuter, basic wellness care, diagnostics, medical management, disease control, shelter management and biosecurity. Students spend five days at shelters in the junior year of the curriculum and two weeks working on mobile veterinary units in their senior year. The program helps meet accreditation standards of the American Veterinary Medical Association's Council on Education that require students to have hands-on experience and is in keeping with recommendations from the North American Veterinary Medical Education Consortium. The program responds, in part, to the challenge from the Pew Study on Future Directions for Veterinary Medicine that argued that veterinary students do not graduate with the level of knowledge and skills that is commensurate with the number of years of professional education.

No MeSH data available.