Limits...
The Use of Refuges by Communally Housed Cats.

de Oliveira AS, Terçariol CA, Genaro G - Animals (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: In a test with vertical environmental enrichment, the animals showed an increased length of stay in refuges located at a height of 0.5 m compared to those on the ground (0.0 m).Both horizontal and vertical environmental enrichment increased the use of available space, demonstrating that box refuges as enrichment are effective in providing a refuge when at a height, or a place to explore at ground level.This information adds to the body of evidence relating to cat enrichment and can be useful in designing cat housing in veterinary clinics, research laboratories, shelters and domestic homes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Programa de Pós-Graduação em Psicobiologia, Departamento de Psicologia, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. dos Bandeirantes, 3900, Ribeirão Preto, SP 14040-901, Brazil. adrianasicuto@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
The increase of domestic animals kept in shelters highlights the need to ensure animal welfare. Environmental enrichment can improve animal welfare in many ways, such as encouraging captive animals to use all the space available to them. The effects of physical environmental enrichment on the spatial distribution and behavioral repertoire of 35 neutered domestic cats housed communally were analyzed. The provision of boxes in the environment increases the use of available space by the cats. We suggest this improves the cats' welfare while in communally-housed rescue shelters. The frequencies of active and especially inactive behaviors also increased in the enriched condition. In a test with vertical environmental enrichment, the animals showed an increased length of stay in refuges located at a height of 0.5 m compared to those on the ground (0.0 m). However, the entry frequency was higher in refuges at 0.0 m. Both horizontal and vertical environmental enrichment increased the use of available space, demonstrating that box refuges as enrichment are effective in providing a refuge when at a height, or a place to explore at ground level. We suggest it enhances the welfare of cats in communally housed shelters. This information adds to the body of evidence relating to cat enrichment and can be useful in designing cat housing in veterinary clinics, research laboratories, shelters and domestic homes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean numbers of individuals engaged in active and inactive behaviors in the categories “with refuges” (light bars) and “without refuges” (dark bars) during the four days of video recording in each condition for two hours. *p = 0.0019; †p < 0.0001; ‡p = 0.0023.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494404&req=5

animals-05-00245-f004: Mean numbers of individuals engaged in active and inactive behaviors in the categories “with refuges” (light bars) and “without refuges” (dark bars) during the four days of video recording in each condition for two hours. *p = 0.0019; †p < 0.0001; ‡p = 0.0023.

Mentions: In the control situation “without enrichment”, the frequency of inactive behaviors was greater than that of active behaviors (factive = 0.49 ± 0.0065 animals/record; finactive = 0.92 ± 0.0104 animals/record, p = 0.0023). With enrichment, the frequencies of active and inactive behaviors increased significantly (factive = 0.90 ± 0.0093 animals/record; finactive = 0.49 ± 0.0161 animals/record), and the inactive behaviors continued to be more frequent than the active behaviors (p < 0.0001), maintaining the difference between the two categories (unpaired t test, df = 248, t = 3.087, Figure 4).


The Use of Refuges by Communally Housed Cats.

de Oliveira AS, Terçariol CA, Genaro G - Animals (Basel) (2015)

Mean numbers of individuals engaged in active and inactive behaviors in the categories “with refuges” (light bars) and “without refuges” (dark bars) during the four days of video recording in each condition for two hours. *p = 0.0019; †p < 0.0001; ‡p = 0.0023.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494404&req=5

animals-05-00245-f004: Mean numbers of individuals engaged in active and inactive behaviors in the categories “with refuges” (light bars) and “without refuges” (dark bars) during the four days of video recording in each condition for two hours. *p = 0.0019; †p < 0.0001; ‡p = 0.0023.
Mentions: In the control situation “without enrichment”, the frequency of inactive behaviors was greater than that of active behaviors (factive = 0.49 ± 0.0065 animals/record; finactive = 0.92 ± 0.0104 animals/record, p = 0.0023). With enrichment, the frequencies of active and inactive behaviors increased significantly (factive = 0.90 ± 0.0093 animals/record; finactive = 0.49 ± 0.0161 animals/record), and the inactive behaviors continued to be more frequent than the active behaviors (p < 0.0001), maintaining the difference between the two categories (unpaired t test, df = 248, t = 3.087, Figure 4).

Bottom Line: In a test with vertical environmental enrichment, the animals showed an increased length of stay in refuges located at a height of 0.5 m compared to those on the ground (0.0 m).Both horizontal and vertical environmental enrichment increased the use of available space, demonstrating that box refuges as enrichment are effective in providing a refuge when at a height, or a place to explore at ground level.This information adds to the body of evidence relating to cat enrichment and can be useful in designing cat housing in veterinary clinics, research laboratories, shelters and domestic homes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Programa de Pós-Graduação em Psicobiologia, Departamento de Psicologia, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. dos Bandeirantes, 3900, Ribeirão Preto, SP 14040-901, Brazil. adrianasicuto@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
The increase of domestic animals kept in shelters highlights the need to ensure animal welfare. Environmental enrichment can improve animal welfare in many ways, such as encouraging captive animals to use all the space available to them. The effects of physical environmental enrichment on the spatial distribution and behavioral repertoire of 35 neutered domestic cats housed communally were analyzed. The provision of boxes in the environment increases the use of available space by the cats. We suggest this improves the cats' welfare while in communally-housed rescue shelters. The frequencies of active and especially inactive behaviors also increased in the enriched condition. In a test with vertical environmental enrichment, the animals showed an increased length of stay in refuges located at a height of 0.5 m compared to those on the ground (0.0 m). However, the entry frequency was higher in refuges at 0.0 m. Both horizontal and vertical environmental enrichment increased the use of available space, demonstrating that box refuges as enrichment are effective in providing a refuge when at a height, or a place to explore at ground level. We suggest it enhances the welfare of cats in communally housed shelters. This information adds to the body of evidence relating to cat enrichment and can be useful in designing cat housing in veterinary clinics, research laboratories, shelters and domestic homes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus