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The Release of a Captive-Raised Female African Elephant (Loxodonta africana) in the Okavango Delta, Botswana.

Evans K, Moore RJ, Harris S - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Bottom Line: Wild female elephants live in close-knit matrilineal groups and housing captive elephants in artificial social groupings can cause significant welfare issues for individuals not accepted by other group members.Although she did not fully integrate into a wild herd, she had three calves of her own, and formed a social unit with another female and her calf that were later released from the same captive herd.We recommend that release to the wild be considered as a management option for other captive female elephants.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol, Woodland Road, Bristol BS8 1UG, UK. kate@elephantsforafrica.org.

ABSTRACT
Wild female elephants live in close-knit matrilineal groups and housing captive elephants in artificial social groupings can cause significant welfare issues for individuals not accepted by other group members. We document the release of a captive-raised female elephant used in the safari industry because of welfare and management problems. She was fitted with a satellite collar, and spatial and behavioural data were collected over a 17-month period to quantify her interactions with the wild population. She was then monitored infrequently for a further five-and-a-half years. We observed few signs of aggression towards her from the wild elephants with which she socialized. She used an area of comparable size to wild female elephants, and this continued to increase as she explored new areas. Although she did not fully integrate into a wild herd, she had three calves of her own, and formed a social unit with another female and her calf that were later released from the same captive herd. We recommend that release to the wild be considered as a management option for other captive female elephants.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentage of sightings of Nandipa within different social groupings each month following her release. Numbers in italics show the sample size each month and the total sample size.
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animals-03-00370-f001: Percentage of sightings of Nandipa within different social groupings each month following her release. Numbers in italics show the sample size each month and the total sample size.

Mentions: Immediately after her release, Nandipa spent a week alone in thick wooded vegetation, before starting to explore. After 17 days she joined up with all three of the previously released males. In December 2003 the three released males moved east away from the release site. Nandipa then briefly joined a wild herd and, when this herd moved away at the end of December 2003, she went with them. Over the next five months she was seen with wild herds 20 km southwest of the release site. In May 2004 the released males returned to the vicinity of the release site and Nandipa began to spend time with one or more of them and the wild males with which they associated. Thereafter Nandipa spent the majority of her time with one or more of the released males until February 2005, the end of the intensive monitoring period (Figure 1).


The Release of a Captive-Raised Female African Elephant (Loxodonta africana) in the Okavango Delta, Botswana.

Evans K, Moore RJ, Harris S - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Percentage of sightings of Nandipa within different social groupings each month following her release. Numbers in italics show the sample size each month and the total sample size.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494400&req=5

animals-03-00370-f001: Percentage of sightings of Nandipa within different social groupings each month following her release. Numbers in italics show the sample size each month and the total sample size.
Mentions: Immediately after her release, Nandipa spent a week alone in thick wooded vegetation, before starting to explore. After 17 days she joined up with all three of the previously released males. In December 2003 the three released males moved east away from the release site. Nandipa then briefly joined a wild herd and, when this herd moved away at the end of December 2003, she went with them. Over the next five months she was seen with wild herds 20 km southwest of the release site. In May 2004 the released males returned to the vicinity of the release site and Nandipa began to spend time with one or more of them and the wild males with which they associated. Thereafter Nandipa spent the majority of her time with one or more of the released males until February 2005, the end of the intensive monitoring period (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Wild female elephants live in close-knit matrilineal groups and housing captive elephants in artificial social groupings can cause significant welfare issues for individuals not accepted by other group members.Although she did not fully integrate into a wild herd, she had three calves of her own, and formed a social unit with another female and her calf that were later released from the same captive herd.We recommend that release to the wild be considered as a management option for other captive female elephants.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol, Woodland Road, Bristol BS8 1UG, UK. kate@elephantsforafrica.org.

ABSTRACT
Wild female elephants live in close-knit matrilineal groups and housing captive elephants in artificial social groupings can cause significant welfare issues for individuals not accepted by other group members. We document the release of a captive-raised female elephant used in the safari industry because of welfare and management problems. She was fitted with a satellite collar, and spatial and behavioural data were collected over a 17-month period to quantify her interactions with the wild population. She was then monitored infrequently for a further five-and-a-half years. We observed few signs of aggression towards her from the wild elephants with which she socialized. She used an area of comparable size to wild female elephants, and this continued to increase as she explored new areas. Although she did not fully integrate into a wild herd, she had three calves of her own, and formed a social unit with another female and her calf that were later released from the same captive herd. We recommend that release to the wild be considered as a management option for other captive female elephants.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus