Limits...
Assessing Ulcerative Pododermatitis of Breeding Rabbits.

Rosell JM, de la Fuente LF - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Bottom Line: Pain causes behavioral changes; productivity is reduced and the most seriously affected animals die or are culled.The study highlights that the rate of farms with footrests increased from 27.8% in 2001 to 75.2% in 2012.Overall, prevalence was 4.87 ± 0.26 on farms with footrests and 13.71 ± 0.32 without (P < 0.01).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cunivet Service, P.O. Box 518, 43080 Tarragona, Spain. jmrosellp@cunivetservice.com.

ABSTRACT
Rabbits in conventional farms are housed in wire net cages with mesh floors to separate them from droppings. In time, lacerations appear on the legs of adult rabbits causing ulcerative pododermatitis or sore hocks, a severe health and welfare problem. Pain causes behavioral changes; productivity is reduced and the most seriously affected animals die or are culled. In this study we evaluated the attention producers have given to this problem and its prevention by installing footrests in cages. We made 2,331 visits to 664 commercial farms in Spain and Portugal between 2001 and 2012, and evaluated morbidity by examining 105,009 females and 10,722 males. The study highlights that the rate of farms with footrests increased from 27.8% in 2001 to 75.2% in 2012. Prevalence of sore hocks in does in 2001 was 11.4%, decreasing to 6.3% in 2012; prevention of ulcerative pododermatitis was associated (P < 0.001) with the presence of footrests. Overall, prevalence was 4.87 ± 0.26 on farms with footrests and 13.71 ± 0.32 without (P < 0.01).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Evolution of the percentage of visited farms using footrests. There were 635 doe farms visited in Spain and Portugal during 2001–2012.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494398&req=5

animals-03-00318-f001: Evolution of the percentage of visited farms using footrests. There were 635 doe farms visited in Spain and Portugal during 2001–2012.

Mentions: Figure 1 shows the evolution of the percentage of farms with footrests, which increased from 27.8% in 2001 to 75.2% in 2012. From the database, we took a subgroup of 37 farms visited both in 2001 and 2012, to determine their evolution; in 2001, 17/37 (46%) of these farms had footrests in comparison with 33/37 (89.2%) in 2012. These findings may be highlighted in our study.


Assessing Ulcerative Pododermatitis of Breeding Rabbits.

Rosell JM, de la Fuente LF - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Evolution of the percentage of visited farms using footrests. There were 635 doe farms visited in Spain and Portugal during 2001–2012.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494398&req=5

animals-03-00318-f001: Evolution of the percentage of visited farms using footrests. There were 635 doe farms visited in Spain and Portugal during 2001–2012.
Mentions: Figure 1 shows the evolution of the percentage of farms with footrests, which increased from 27.8% in 2001 to 75.2% in 2012. From the database, we took a subgroup of 37 farms visited both in 2001 and 2012, to determine their evolution; in 2001, 17/37 (46%) of these farms had footrests in comparison with 33/37 (89.2%) in 2012. These findings may be highlighted in our study.

Bottom Line: Pain causes behavioral changes; productivity is reduced and the most seriously affected animals die or are culled.The study highlights that the rate of farms with footrests increased from 27.8% in 2001 to 75.2% in 2012.Overall, prevalence was 4.87 ± 0.26 on farms with footrests and 13.71 ± 0.32 without (P < 0.01).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cunivet Service, P.O. Box 518, 43080 Tarragona, Spain. jmrosellp@cunivetservice.com.

ABSTRACT
Rabbits in conventional farms are housed in wire net cages with mesh floors to separate them from droppings. In time, lacerations appear on the legs of adult rabbits causing ulcerative pododermatitis or sore hocks, a severe health and welfare problem. Pain causes behavioral changes; productivity is reduced and the most seriously affected animals die or are culled. In this study we evaluated the attention producers have given to this problem and its prevention by installing footrests in cages. We made 2,331 visits to 664 commercial farms in Spain and Portugal between 2001 and 2012, and evaluated morbidity by examining 105,009 females and 10,722 males. The study highlights that the rate of farms with footrests increased from 27.8% in 2001 to 75.2% in 2012. Prevalence of sore hocks in does in 2001 was 11.4%, decreasing to 6.3% in 2012; prevention of ulcerative pododermatitis was associated (P < 0.001) with the presence of footrests. Overall, prevalence was 4.87 ± 0.26 on farms with footrests and 13.71 ± 0.32 without (P < 0.01).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus