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On the Possible Detection of Lightning Storms by Elephants.

Kelley MC, Garstang M - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Bottom Line: Theoretical calculations suggest that sounds produced by thunderstorms and detected by a system similar to the International Monitoring System (IMS) for the detection of nuclear explosions at distances ≥100 km, are at sound pressure levels equal to or greater than 6 × 10(-3) Pa.Such sound pressure levels are well within the range of elephant hearing.Determining whether it is possible for elephants to hear and locate thunderstorms contributes to the question of whether elephant movements are triggered or influenced by these abiotic sounds.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA. mikek@ece.cornell.edu.

ABSTRACT
Theoretical calculations suggest that sounds produced by thunderstorms and detected by a system similar to the International Monitoring System (IMS) for the detection of nuclear explosions at distances ≥100 km, are at sound pressure levels equal to or greater than 6 × 10(-3) Pa. Such sound pressure levels are well within the range of elephant hearing. Frequencies carrying these sounds might allow for interaural time delays such that adult elephants could not only hear but could also locate the source of these sounds. Determining whether it is possible for elephants to hear and locate thunderstorms contributes to the question of whether elephant movements are triggered or influenced by these abiotic sounds.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Lightning-generated infrasound amplitude versus ground distance. Amplitude of infrasound from lightning versus lightning distance (colored crosses) in a semi-log plot. The black line is the result of linear regression [5].
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animals-03-00349-f003: Lightning-generated infrasound amplitude versus ground distance. Amplitude of infrasound from lightning versus lightning distance (colored crosses) in a semi-log plot. The black line is the result of linear regression [5].

Mentions: Sensible heat flux and inversion heights were taken from observations in typical elephant habitat by a flux tower, vertical pointing, continuously operating SODAR and a profiling tethered balloon (Figure 2). The infrasound data were obtained using instrumentation similar to that used by the International Monitoring System (IMS) infrasound network (Figure 3) and published by Farges and Blanc [5].


On the Possible Detection of Lightning Storms by Elephants.

Kelley MC, Garstang M - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Lightning-generated infrasound amplitude versus ground distance. Amplitude of infrasound from lightning versus lightning distance (colored crosses) in a semi-log plot. The black line is the result of linear regression [5].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494393&req=5

animals-03-00349-f003: Lightning-generated infrasound amplitude versus ground distance. Amplitude of infrasound from lightning versus lightning distance (colored crosses) in a semi-log plot. The black line is the result of linear regression [5].
Mentions: Sensible heat flux and inversion heights were taken from observations in typical elephant habitat by a flux tower, vertical pointing, continuously operating SODAR and a profiling tethered balloon (Figure 2). The infrasound data were obtained using instrumentation similar to that used by the International Monitoring System (IMS) infrasound network (Figure 3) and published by Farges and Blanc [5].

Bottom Line: Theoretical calculations suggest that sounds produced by thunderstorms and detected by a system similar to the International Monitoring System (IMS) for the detection of nuclear explosions at distances ≥100 km, are at sound pressure levels equal to or greater than 6 × 10(-3) Pa.Such sound pressure levels are well within the range of elephant hearing.Determining whether it is possible for elephants to hear and locate thunderstorms contributes to the question of whether elephant movements are triggered or influenced by these abiotic sounds.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA. mikek@ece.cornell.edu.

ABSTRACT
Theoretical calculations suggest that sounds produced by thunderstorms and detected by a system similar to the International Monitoring System (IMS) for the detection of nuclear explosions at distances ≥100 km, are at sound pressure levels equal to or greater than 6 × 10(-3) Pa. Such sound pressure levels are well within the range of elephant hearing. Frequencies carrying these sounds might allow for interaural time delays such that adult elephants could not only hear but could also locate the source of these sounds. Determining whether it is possible for elephants to hear and locate thunderstorms contributes to the question of whether elephant movements are triggered or influenced by these abiotic sounds.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus