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Consumer Acceptance of Dry Dog Food Variations.

Di Donfrancesco B, Koppel K, Swaney-Stueve M, Chambers E - Animals (Basel) (2014)

Bottom Line: The objectives of this study were to compare the acceptance of different dry dog food products by consumers, determine consumer clusters for acceptance, and identify the characteristics of dog food that drive consumer acceptance.The results indicated that appearance of the sample, especially the color, influenced pet owner's overall liking more than the aroma of the product.Overall liking clusters were not related to income, age, gender, or education, indicating that general consumer demographics do not appear to play a main role in individual consumer acceptance of dog food products.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Sensory Analysis Center, Department of Human Nutrition, Ice Hall, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA. briziod@ksu.edu.

ABSTRACT
The objectives of this study were to compare the acceptance of different dry dog food products by consumers, determine consumer clusters for acceptance, and identify the characteristics of dog food that drive consumer acceptance. Eight dry dog food samples available in the US market were evaluated by pet owners. In this study, consumers evaluated overall liking, aroma, and appearance liking of the products. Consumers were also asked to predict their purchase intent, their dog's liking, and cost of the samples. The results indicated that appearance of the sample, especially the color, influenced pet owner's overall liking more than the aroma of the product. Overall liking clusters were not related to income, age, gender, or education, indicating that general consumer demographics do not appear to play a main role in individual consumer acceptance of dog food products.

No MeSH data available.


Purchase intent (1 = definitely would not purchase by consumers, 3 = may or may not purchase, 5 = definitely would purchase), predicted cost (1 = not at all expensive to 5 = very expensive) Different letters within a variable indicate a significant difference among the samples (P < 0.05).
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animals-04-00313-f001: Purchase intent (1 = definitely would not purchase by consumers, 3 = may or may not purchase, 5 = definitely would purchase), predicted cost (1 = not at all expensive to 5 = very expensive) Different letters within a variable indicate a significant difference among the samples (P < 0.05).

Mentions: Attributes such as aroma, color, oily appearance, and size also were scored for intensity (Table 5). Color intensity of kibbles in sample C was perceived by most of the consumers (79%) as ‘just about right’. In contrast to the other sample with different kibbles (Sample A) which was perceived as low in uniformity of shape by a large portion of consumers (54%), sample C was perceived as ‘just about right’ for shape uniformity by 77% of consumers. When asked to predict purchase intent and product price, consumers indicated this sample (C) was the one they were more willing to buy despite the fact that this sample also was perceived to be the most expensive product within the sample set (Figure 1). This could be explained by the positive correlation shown between perception of quality and price. Plassmann et al. [16] found that when a product was perceived as more expensive, the consumers rate it better than the product perceived as less expensive. Consequently, a low price perception is translated into a lower acceptability by consumers because of expected lower product quality. In this study, the highest predicted prices were earned by the two multi-shaped and multicolored kibbles products (C and A). However, the highest score (C) was 3.75 on a scale where 3 = neither expensive nor inexpensive and 5 = very expensive. Pet owners also predicted that sample C would be the most appreciated product by their dogs. This data suggest that consumers equate high price with high pet acceptability and appear willing to purchase more expensive dog foods. Except for sample C, the other samples in this study do not show a significant difference for consumers’ expectation of liking by their pet dogs and it is not possible to verify if consumers relate low predicted price with low pet acceptability.


Consumer Acceptance of Dry Dog Food Variations.

Di Donfrancesco B, Koppel K, Swaney-Stueve M, Chambers E - Animals (Basel) (2014)

Purchase intent (1 = definitely would not purchase by consumers, 3 = may or may not purchase, 5 = definitely would purchase), predicted cost (1 = not at all expensive to 5 = very expensive) Different letters within a variable indicate a significant difference among the samples (P < 0.05).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494379&req=5

animals-04-00313-f001: Purchase intent (1 = definitely would not purchase by consumers, 3 = may or may not purchase, 5 = definitely would purchase), predicted cost (1 = not at all expensive to 5 = very expensive) Different letters within a variable indicate a significant difference among the samples (P < 0.05).
Mentions: Attributes such as aroma, color, oily appearance, and size also were scored for intensity (Table 5). Color intensity of kibbles in sample C was perceived by most of the consumers (79%) as ‘just about right’. In contrast to the other sample with different kibbles (Sample A) which was perceived as low in uniformity of shape by a large portion of consumers (54%), sample C was perceived as ‘just about right’ for shape uniformity by 77% of consumers. When asked to predict purchase intent and product price, consumers indicated this sample (C) was the one they were more willing to buy despite the fact that this sample also was perceived to be the most expensive product within the sample set (Figure 1). This could be explained by the positive correlation shown between perception of quality and price. Plassmann et al. [16] found that when a product was perceived as more expensive, the consumers rate it better than the product perceived as less expensive. Consequently, a low price perception is translated into a lower acceptability by consumers because of expected lower product quality. In this study, the highest predicted prices were earned by the two multi-shaped and multicolored kibbles products (C and A). However, the highest score (C) was 3.75 on a scale where 3 = neither expensive nor inexpensive and 5 = very expensive. Pet owners also predicted that sample C would be the most appreciated product by their dogs. This data suggest that consumers equate high price with high pet acceptability and appear willing to purchase more expensive dog foods. Except for sample C, the other samples in this study do not show a significant difference for consumers’ expectation of liking by their pet dogs and it is not possible to verify if consumers relate low predicted price with low pet acceptability.

Bottom Line: The objectives of this study were to compare the acceptance of different dry dog food products by consumers, determine consumer clusters for acceptance, and identify the characteristics of dog food that drive consumer acceptance.The results indicated that appearance of the sample, especially the color, influenced pet owner's overall liking more than the aroma of the product.Overall liking clusters were not related to income, age, gender, or education, indicating that general consumer demographics do not appear to play a main role in individual consumer acceptance of dog food products.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Sensory Analysis Center, Department of Human Nutrition, Ice Hall, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA. briziod@ksu.edu.

ABSTRACT
The objectives of this study were to compare the acceptance of different dry dog food products by consumers, determine consumer clusters for acceptance, and identify the characteristics of dog food that drive consumer acceptance. Eight dry dog food samples available in the US market were evaluated by pet owners. In this study, consumers evaluated overall liking, aroma, and appearance liking of the products. Consumers were also asked to predict their purchase intent, their dog's liking, and cost of the samples. The results indicated that appearance of the sample, especially the color, influenced pet owner's overall liking more than the aroma of the product. Overall liking clusters were not related to income, age, gender, or education, indicating that general consumer demographics do not appear to play a main role in individual consumer acceptance of dog food products.

No MeSH data available.