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Establishing Bedding Requirements during Transport and Monitoring Skin Temperature during Cold and Mild Seasons after Transport for Finishing Pigs.

McGlone J, Johnson A, Sapkota A, Kephart R - Animals (Basel) (2014)

Bottom Line: Average skin surface temperature during unloading increased with outside air temperature linearly in both experiments (P < 0.01).In conclusion, over-use of bedding may be economically inefficient.Pig skin surface temperature could be a useful measure of pig welfare during or after transport.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Animal and Food Sciences, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409, USA. john.mcglone@ttu.edu.

ABSTRACT
The broad aim of this study was to determine whether bedding level in the transport trailer influenced pig performance and welfare. Specifically, the objective was to define the bedding requirements of pigs during transportation in commercial settings during cold and mild weather. Animals (n = 112,078 pigs on 572 trailers) used were raised in commercial finishing sites and transported in trailers to commercial processing plants. Dead on arrival (DOA), non-ambulatory (NA), and total dead and down (D&D) data were collected and skin surface temperatures of the pigs were measured by infrared thermography. Data were collected during winter (Experiment 1) and fall/spring (Experiment 2). Total D&D percent showed no interaction between bedding level and outside air temperature in any experiments. Average skin surface temperature during unloading increased with outside air temperature linearly in both experiments (P < 0.01). In conclusion, over-use of bedding may be economically inefficient. Pig skin surface temperature could be a useful measure of pig welfare during or after transport.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Least square means of dead on arrival (DOA), non-ambulatory (NA), and total dead and down (D&D) pigs, respectively, in relation to outside temperature bins in cold weather. Total number of loads for each temperature bin is given in parentheses: −5 °C (14), 0 °C (44), 5 °C (24), 10 °C (15), 15 °C (9), and 20 °C (4). A total of 110 trailers each carrying an average of 164.28 pigs were used for this study.
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animals-04-00241-f001: Least square means of dead on arrival (DOA), non-ambulatory (NA), and total dead and down (D&D) pigs, respectively, in relation to outside temperature bins in cold weather. Total number of loads for each temperature bin is given in parentheses: −5 °C (14), 0 °C (44), 5 °C (24), 10 °C (15), 15 °C (9), and 20 °C (4). A total of 110 trailers each carrying an average of 164.28 pigs were used for this study.

Mentions: The percentage of DOA, NA, and D&D pigs in relation to outside temperature bins in cold weather is presented in Figure 1.


Establishing Bedding Requirements during Transport and Monitoring Skin Temperature during Cold and Mild Seasons after Transport for Finishing Pigs.

McGlone J, Johnson A, Sapkota A, Kephart R - Animals (Basel) (2014)

Least square means of dead on arrival (DOA), non-ambulatory (NA), and total dead and down (D&D) pigs, respectively, in relation to outside temperature bins in cold weather. Total number of loads for each temperature bin is given in parentheses: −5 °C (14), 0 °C (44), 5 °C (24), 10 °C (15), 15 °C (9), and 20 °C (4). A total of 110 trailers each carrying an average of 164.28 pigs were used for this study.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494375&req=5

animals-04-00241-f001: Least square means of dead on arrival (DOA), non-ambulatory (NA), and total dead and down (D&D) pigs, respectively, in relation to outside temperature bins in cold weather. Total number of loads for each temperature bin is given in parentheses: −5 °C (14), 0 °C (44), 5 °C (24), 10 °C (15), 15 °C (9), and 20 °C (4). A total of 110 trailers each carrying an average of 164.28 pigs were used for this study.
Mentions: The percentage of DOA, NA, and D&D pigs in relation to outside temperature bins in cold weather is presented in Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Average skin surface temperature during unloading increased with outside air temperature linearly in both experiments (P < 0.01).In conclusion, over-use of bedding may be economically inefficient.Pig skin surface temperature could be a useful measure of pig welfare during or after transport.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Animal and Food Sciences, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409, USA. john.mcglone@ttu.edu.

ABSTRACT
The broad aim of this study was to determine whether bedding level in the transport trailer influenced pig performance and welfare. Specifically, the objective was to define the bedding requirements of pigs during transportation in commercial settings during cold and mild weather. Animals (n = 112,078 pigs on 572 trailers) used were raised in commercial finishing sites and transported in trailers to commercial processing plants. Dead on arrival (DOA), non-ambulatory (NA), and total dead and down (D&D) data were collected and skin surface temperatures of the pigs were measured by infrared thermography. Data were collected during winter (Experiment 1) and fall/spring (Experiment 2). Total D&D percent showed no interaction between bedding level and outside air temperature in any experiments. Average skin surface temperature during unloading increased with outside air temperature linearly in both experiments (P < 0.01). In conclusion, over-use of bedding may be economically inefficient. Pig skin surface temperature could be a useful measure of pig welfare during or after transport.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus