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Hopping Down the Main Street: Eastern Grey Kangaroos at Home in an Urban Matrix.

Coulson G, Cripps JK, Wilson ME - Animals (Basel) (2014)

Bottom Line: Vehicles were the major (47%) cause of mortality of tagged adults.Road-kills were concentrated (74%) in autumn and winter, and were heavily male biased: half of all tagged males died on roads compared with only 20% of tagged females.We predict that this novel and potent mortality factor will have profound, long-term impacts on the demography and behavior of the urban kangaroo population at Anglesea.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Zoology, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia. gcoulson@unimelb.edu.au.

ABSTRACT
Most urban mammals are small. However, one of the largest marsupials, the Eastern Grey Kangaroo Macropus giganteus, occurs in some urban areas. In 2007, we embarked on a longitudinal study of this species in the seaside town of Anglesea in southern Victoria, Australia. We have captured and tagged 360 individuals to date, fitting each adult with a collar displaying its name. We have monitored survival, reproduction and movements by resighting, recapture and radio-tracking, augmented by citizen science reports of collared individuals. Kangaroos occurred throughout the town, but the golf course formed the nucleus of this urban population. The course supported a high density of kangaroos (2-5/ha), and approximately half of them were tagged. Total counts of kangaroos on the golf course were highest in summer, at the peak of the mating season, and lowest in winter, when many males but not females left the course. Almost all tagged adult females were sedentary, using only part of the golf course and adjacent native vegetation and residential blocks. In contrast, during the non-mating season (autumn and winter), many tagged adult males ranged widely across the town in a mix of native vegetation remnants, recreation reserves, vacant blocks, commercial properties and residential gardens. Annual fecundity of tagged females was generally high (≥70%), but survival of tagged juveniles was low (54%). We could not determine the cause of death of most juveniles. Vehicles were the major (47%) cause of mortality of tagged adults. Road-kills were concentrated (74%) in autumn and winter, and were heavily male biased: half of all tagged males died on roads compared with only 20% of tagged females. We predict that this novel and potent mortality factor will have profound, long-term impacts on the demography and behavior of the urban kangaroo population at Anglesea.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Aerial photograph of the Anglesea Golf Club, Victoria, Australia, showing the layout of the 18-hole course and the contrast between open foraging areas and vegetated shelter for Eastern Grey Kangaroos Macropus giganteus.
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animals-04-00272-f002: Aerial photograph of the Anglesea Golf Club, Victoria, Australia, showing the layout of the 18-hole course and the contrast between open foraging areas and vegetated shelter for Eastern Grey Kangaroos Macropus giganteus.

Mentions: The Anglesea Golf Club has an 18-hole course of tree-lined fairways (Figure 2) planted with Couch Grass Cynodon dactylon, which is irrigated and fertilized, as are the tees and greens. The Front Nine (holes 1–9) is 32 ha in area, including practice areas and a Couch Grass nursery. The Front Nine is bounded to the north and west by the Anglesea Heath, an extensive area of native vegetation dominated by eucalypts with an understory of low shrubs. Its southern side is bounded partly by a band of remnant native woodland bordering residential streets, and by the entrance road to the clubhouse; the eastern side is bounded by Golf Links Road, with houses on the opposite side. The Front Nine is unfenced, so kangaroos can move freely in all directions across these boundaries. The Back Nine (holes 10–18) is 27 ha in area. It is bounded to the south and west by houses facing away from the course; many are unfenced so kangaroos can move through the yards onto residential streets. Its northern and western sides are demarcated by a 1.8-m high steel mesh fence, which is designed to stop kangaroos moving onto Golf Links Road and the entrance road, and to restrict access to the course by tourists. Each half of the course has a 2-ha patch of remnant native vegetation, roughly in the center, providing additional refuge for the kangaroos.


Hopping Down the Main Street: Eastern Grey Kangaroos at Home in an Urban Matrix.

Coulson G, Cripps JK, Wilson ME - Animals (Basel) (2014)

Aerial photograph of the Anglesea Golf Club, Victoria, Australia, showing the layout of the 18-hole course and the contrast between open foraging areas and vegetated shelter for Eastern Grey Kangaroos Macropus giganteus.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494371&req=5

animals-04-00272-f002: Aerial photograph of the Anglesea Golf Club, Victoria, Australia, showing the layout of the 18-hole course and the contrast between open foraging areas and vegetated shelter for Eastern Grey Kangaroos Macropus giganteus.
Mentions: The Anglesea Golf Club has an 18-hole course of tree-lined fairways (Figure 2) planted with Couch Grass Cynodon dactylon, which is irrigated and fertilized, as are the tees and greens. The Front Nine (holes 1–9) is 32 ha in area, including practice areas and a Couch Grass nursery. The Front Nine is bounded to the north and west by the Anglesea Heath, an extensive area of native vegetation dominated by eucalypts with an understory of low shrubs. Its southern side is bounded partly by a band of remnant native woodland bordering residential streets, and by the entrance road to the clubhouse; the eastern side is bounded by Golf Links Road, with houses on the opposite side. The Front Nine is unfenced, so kangaroos can move freely in all directions across these boundaries. The Back Nine (holes 10–18) is 27 ha in area. It is bounded to the south and west by houses facing away from the course; many are unfenced so kangaroos can move through the yards onto residential streets. Its northern and western sides are demarcated by a 1.8-m high steel mesh fence, which is designed to stop kangaroos moving onto Golf Links Road and the entrance road, and to restrict access to the course by tourists. Each half of the course has a 2-ha patch of remnant native vegetation, roughly in the center, providing additional refuge for the kangaroos.

Bottom Line: Vehicles were the major (47%) cause of mortality of tagged adults.Road-kills were concentrated (74%) in autumn and winter, and were heavily male biased: half of all tagged males died on roads compared with only 20% of tagged females.We predict that this novel and potent mortality factor will have profound, long-term impacts on the demography and behavior of the urban kangaroo population at Anglesea.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Zoology, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia. gcoulson@unimelb.edu.au.

ABSTRACT
Most urban mammals are small. However, one of the largest marsupials, the Eastern Grey Kangaroo Macropus giganteus, occurs in some urban areas. In 2007, we embarked on a longitudinal study of this species in the seaside town of Anglesea in southern Victoria, Australia. We have captured and tagged 360 individuals to date, fitting each adult with a collar displaying its name. We have monitored survival, reproduction and movements by resighting, recapture and radio-tracking, augmented by citizen science reports of collared individuals. Kangaroos occurred throughout the town, but the golf course formed the nucleus of this urban population. The course supported a high density of kangaroos (2-5/ha), and approximately half of them were tagged. Total counts of kangaroos on the golf course were highest in summer, at the peak of the mating season, and lowest in winter, when many males but not females left the course. Almost all tagged adult females were sedentary, using only part of the golf course and adjacent native vegetation and residential blocks. In contrast, during the non-mating season (autumn and winter), many tagged adult males ranged widely across the town in a mix of native vegetation remnants, recreation reserves, vacant blocks, commercial properties and residential gardens. Annual fecundity of tagged females was generally high (≥70%), but survival of tagged juveniles was low (54%). We could not determine the cause of death of most juveniles. Vehicles were the major (47%) cause of mortality of tagged adults. Road-kills were concentrated (74%) in autumn and winter, and were heavily male biased: half of all tagged males died on roads compared with only 20% of tagged females. We predict that this novel and potent mortality factor will have profound, long-term impacts on the demography and behavior of the urban kangaroo population at Anglesea.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus