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Challenges Encountered During the Veterinary Disaster Response: An Example from Chile.

Garde E, Pérez GE, Acosta-Jamett G, Bronsvoort BM - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Bottom Line: Large-scale disasters have immeasurable effects on human and animal communities.Similar challenges likely occur in most disasters, but can be reduced through pro-active planning at national and local levels.There is sufficient information to support the human and animal welfare benefits of including companion animals in national planning, and lessons learned through this and other experiences can assist planners in the development of comprehensive and locally relevant contingency plans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Pathway Medicine, School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH16 4SB, UK. elena@vetswithoutborders.ca.

ABSTRACT
Large-scale disasters have immeasurable effects on human and animal communities. Evaluating and reporting on the response successes and difficulties encountered serves to improve existing preparedness documents and provide support to those in the process of developing plans. Although the majority of disasters occur in low and middle income nations, less than 1% of the disaster literature originates from these countries. This report describes a response to a disease outbreak in domestic dogs in Dichato, Chile following the 2010 earthquake/tsunami. With no national plan coordinating the companion animal response, there was a chaotic approach among animal welfare organizations towards rescue, diagnosis, treatment and record-keeping. Similar to the medical response following the 1985 earthquake near Santiago, we experienced problems within our own teams in maintenance of data integrity and protocol compliance. Loss of infrastructure added complications with transportation, communications and acquisition of supplies. Similar challenges likely occur in most disasters, but can be reduced through pro-active planning at national and local levels. There is sufficient information to support the human and animal welfare benefits of including companion animals in national planning, and lessons learned through this and other experiences can assist planners in the development of comprehensive and locally relevant contingency plans.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Description of the ground response immediately following a disaster with examples of typical operations.
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animals-03-01073-f003: Description of the ground response immediately following a disaster with examples of typical operations.

Mentions: Advances in our understanding of the impacts of disasters on people and their animals are critical as they provide the information needed to lobby for national legislation requiring the development of regional preparedness plans that include companion animals (e.g., PETS Act 2006) (Figure 1 and Figure 2). The result is proactive preparation for disasters and detailed planning of the response that is tailored to the location (Figure 3). There is a multitude of state and provincial plans from higher income countries available online, some including companion animals. However, there are few follow-up accounts evaluating the efficacy of these plans [1,23] or details of the long term recovery (Figure 4). This kind of information would serve to improve existing plans and offer guidance to those in the process of developing new preparedness strategies for companion animals. Furthermore, these available plans may only be relevant to “resource-rich” countries [5] where shelters, veterinary services, equipment, supplies and trained personnel are already available. In countries where many of these inherent services and facilities are absent, or the management of animals is dramatically different, disaster planning must reflect the culture, needs, resources and abilities of individual communities.


Challenges Encountered During the Veterinary Disaster Response: An Example from Chile.

Garde E, Pérez GE, Acosta-Jamett G, Bronsvoort BM - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Description of the ground response immediately following a disaster with examples of typical operations.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494366&req=5

animals-03-01073-f003: Description of the ground response immediately following a disaster with examples of typical operations.
Mentions: Advances in our understanding of the impacts of disasters on people and their animals are critical as they provide the information needed to lobby for national legislation requiring the development of regional preparedness plans that include companion animals (e.g., PETS Act 2006) (Figure 1 and Figure 2). The result is proactive preparation for disasters and detailed planning of the response that is tailored to the location (Figure 3). There is a multitude of state and provincial plans from higher income countries available online, some including companion animals. However, there are few follow-up accounts evaluating the efficacy of these plans [1,23] or details of the long term recovery (Figure 4). This kind of information would serve to improve existing plans and offer guidance to those in the process of developing new preparedness strategies for companion animals. Furthermore, these available plans may only be relevant to “resource-rich” countries [5] where shelters, veterinary services, equipment, supplies and trained personnel are already available. In countries where many of these inherent services and facilities are absent, or the management of animals is dramatically different, disaster planning must reflect the culture, needs, resources and abilities of individual communities.

Bottom Line: Large-scale disasters have immeasurable effects on human and animal communities.Similar challenges likely occur in most disasters, but can be reduced through pro-active planning at national and local levels.There is sufficient information to support the human and animal welfare benefits of including companion animals in national planning, and lessons learned through this and other experiences can assist planners in the development of comprehensive and locally relevant contingency plans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Pathway Medicine, School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH16 4SB, UK. elena@vetswithoutborders.ca.

ABSTRACT
Large-scale disasters have immeasurable effects on human and animal communities. Evaluating and reporting on the response successes and difficulties encountered serves to improve existing preparedness documents and provide support to those in the process of developing plans. Although the majority of disasters occur in low and middle income nations, less than 1% of the disaster literature originates from these countries. This report describes a response to a disease outbreak in domestic dogs in Dichato, Chile following the 2010 earthquake/tsunami. With no national plan coordinating the companion animal response, there was a chaotic approach among animal welfare organizations towards rescue, diagnosis, treatment and record-keeping. Similar to the medical response following the 1985 earthquake near Santiago, we experienced problems within our own teams in maintenance of data integrity and protocol compliance. Loss of infrastructure added complications with transportation, communications and acquisition of supplies. Similar challenges likely occur in most disasters, but can be reduced through pro-active planning at national and local levels. There is sufficient information to support the human and animal welfare benefits of including companion animals in national planning, and lessons learned through this and other experiences can assist planners in the development of comprehensive and locally relevant contingency plans.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus