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Stakeholder Perceptions of Threatened Species and Their Management on Urban Beaches.

Maguire GS, Rimmer JM, Weston MA - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Bottom Line: More frequent beach users had greater awareness of the species and their plight but reported greater inconvenience associated with management.Dog walkers reported more inconvenience associated with exclusions and regulations than non-dog walkers.Dog walkers who used the beach infrequently rated threats significantly higher than frequent beach users.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: BirdLife Australia, Suite 2-05, The Green Building, 60 Leicester Street, Carlton, VIC 3053, Australia. grainne.maguire@birdlife.org.au.

ABSTRACT
We surveyed 579 recreationists regarding management of the threatened, beach-dwelling Hooded Plover Thinornis rubricollis. We postulated that: (1) lower awareness of the species and higher 'inconvenience' of management would engender less favourable perceptions of conservation and management; and (2) that frequency of beach use and dog ownership may mediate perceptions and levels of awareness and inconvenience. Overall, inconvenience was low while awareness and support for plover conservation were high. Education and awareness strategies were considered less effective than regulations; exclusion and regulations were considered less desirable than on-ground protective measures. Awareness, frequency of beach use and dog walking did not influence the perceived effectiveness of different managements. More frequent beach users had greater awareness of the species and their plight but reported greater inconvenience associated with management. Respondents with high awareness rated the severity of human-related threats higher; low awareness was associated with more inconvenience associated with on-ground protection, and exclusion and regulations. Dog walkers reported more inconvenience associated with exclusions and regulations than non-dog walkers. Dog walkers who used the beach infrequently rated threats significantly higher than frequent beach users. Conservation and education strategies could usefully be tailored to beach users' level of use and pet ownership.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean scores (± one standard error) for factors for human-related impacts (Factor 1) and integrity of habitat (Factor 2) in relation to respondents beach use (black bars represent yearly, grey bars monthly, and white bars weekly) and dog walking on beaches (dog owners, non-dog owners).
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animals-03-01002-f002: Mean scores (± one standard error) for factors for human-related impacts (Factor 1) and integrity of habitat (Factor 2) in relation to respondents beach use (black bars represent yearly, grey bars monthly, and white bars weekly) and dog walking on beaches (dog owners, non-dog owners).

Mentions: The interaction between frequency of beach use and dog walkers significantly affected how respondents rated threats to Hooded Plovers (Table 7). Non-dog walkers were more similar in their perceptions of threats regardless of how frequently they used beaches whereas dog walkers who used the beach least frequently rated threats significantly higher than those who used the beach at monthly and weekly rates (Figure 2). Furthermore, dog walkers who used the beach most frequently differed significantly in agreement towards conservation statements regarding Hooded Plovers (Table 7). Dog walkers who used the beach at a monthly rate were less supportive of ecosystem benefits than dog walkers using the beach at weekly rates, but this trend was not evident for non-dog walkers (Figure 3). The degree to which non-dog walkers were supportive of the ‘single species benefits’ factor was negatively related to their frequency of beach use, however, this relationship was reversed for dog-walkers (Figure 3). Mean factor scores were still strongly supportive of conservation statements despite trends for differences amongst beach users associated with their frequency of use and dog walking on beaches.


Stakeholder Perceptions of Threatened Species and Their Management on Urban Beaches.

Maguire GS, Rimmer JM, Weston MA - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Mean scores (± one standard error) for factors for human-related impacts (Factor 1) and integrity of habitat (Factor 2) in relation to respondents beach use (black bars represent yearly, grey bars monthly, and white bars weekly) and dog walking on beaches (dog owners, non-dog owners).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494362&req=5

animals-03-01002-f002: Mean scores (± one standard error) for factors for human-related impacts (Factor 1) and integrity of habitat (Factor 2) in relation to respondents beach use (black bars represent yearly, grey bars monthly, and white bars weekly) and dog walking on beaches (dog owners, non-dog owners).
Mentions: The interaction between frequency of beach use and dog walkers significantly affected how respondents rated threats to Hooded Plovers (Table 7). Non-dog walkers were more similar in their perceptions of threats regardless of how frequently they used beaches whereas dog walkers who used the beach least frequently rated threats significantly higher than those who used the beach at monthly and weekly rates (Figure 2). Furthermore, dog walkers who used the beach most frequently differed significantly in agreement towards conservation statements regarding Hooded Plovers (Table 7). Dog walkers who used the beach at a monthly rate were less supportive of ecosystem benefits than dog walkers using the beach at weekly rates, but this trend was not evident for non-dog walkers (Figure 3). The degree to which non-dog walkers were supportive of the ‘single species benefits’ factor was negatively related to their frequency of beach use, however, this relationship was reversed for dog-walkers (Figure 3). Mean factor scores were still strongly supportive of conservation statements despite trends for differences amongst beach users associated with their frequency of use and dog walking on beaches.

Bottom Line: More frequent beach users had greater awareness of the species and their plight but reported greater inconvenience associated with management.Dog walkers reported more inconvenience associated with exclusions and regulations than non-dog walkers.Dog walkers who used the beach infrequently rated threats significantly higher than frequent beach users.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: BirdLife Australia, Suite 2-05, The Green Building, 60 Leicester Street, Carlton, VIC 3053, Australia. grainne.maguire@birdlife.org.au.

ABSTRACT
We surveyed 579 recreationists regarding management of the threatened, beach-dwelling Hooded Plover Thinornis rubricollis. We postulated that: (1) lower awareness of the species and higher 'inconvenience' of management would engender less favourable perceptions of conservation and management; and (2) that frequency of beach use and dog ownership may mediate perceptions and levels of awareness and inconvenience. Overall, inconvenience was low while awareness and support for plover conservation were high. Education and awareness strategies were considered less effective than regulations; exclusion and regulations were considered less desirable than on-ground protective measures. Awareness, frequency of beach use and dog walking did not influence the perceived effectiveness of different managements. More frequent beach users had greater awareness of the species and their plight but reported greater inconvenience associated with management. Respondents with high awareness rated the severity of human-related threats higher; low awareness was associated with more inconvenience associated with on-ground protection, and exclusion and regulations. Dog walkers reported more inconvenience associated with exclusions and regulations than non-dog walkers. Dog walkers who used the beach infrequently rated threats significantly higher than frequent beach users. Conservation and education strategies could usefully be tailored to beach users' level of use and pet ownership.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus