Limits...
Stakeholder Perceptions of Threatened Species and Their Management on Urban Beaches.

Maguire GS, Rimmer JM, Weston MA - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Bottom Line: More frequent beach users had greater awareness of the species and their plight but reported greater inconvenience associated with management.Dog walkers reported more inconvenience associated with exclusions and regulations than non-dog walkers.Dog walkers who used the beach infrequently rated threats significantly higher than frequent beach users.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: BirdLife Australia, Suite 2-05, The Green Building, 60 Leicester Street, Carlton, VIC 3053, Australia. grainne.maguire@birdlife.org.au.

ABSTRACT
We surveyed 579 recreationists regarding management of the threatened, beach-dwelling Hooded Plover Thinornis rubricollis. We postulated that: (1) lower awareness of the species and higher 'inconvenience' of management would engender less favourable perceptions of conservation and management; and (2) that frequency of beach use and dog ownership may mediate perceptions and levels of awareness and inconvenience. Overall, inconvenience was low while awareness and support for plover conservation were high. Education and awareness strategies were considered less effective than regulations; exclusion and regulations were considered less desirable than on-ground protective measures. Awareness, frequency of beach use and dog walking did not influence the perceived effectiveness of different managements. More frequent beach users had greater awareness of the species and their plight but reported greater inconvenience associated with management. Respondents with high awareness rated the severity of human-related threats higher; low awareness was associated with more inconvenience associated with on-ground protection, and exclusion and regulations. Dog walkers reported more inconvenience associated with exclusions and regulations than non-dog walkers. Dog walkers who used the beach infrequently rated threats significantly higher than frequent beach users. Conservation and education strategies could usefully be tailored to beach users' level of use and pet ownership.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean scores (± one standard error) for each factor (theme) as revealed by factor analysis for four separate questions: (1) how serious do you think each threat is, (2) how effective do you think these conservation strategies would be at helping the birds, (3) to what degree would these conservation strategies impact you, and (4) do you think the Hooded Plover is important?
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494362&req=5

animals-03-01002-f001: Mean scores (± one standard error) for each factor (theme) as revealed by factor analysis for four separate questions: (1) how serious do you think each threat is, (2) how effective do you think these conservation strategies would be at helping the birds, (3) to what degree would these conservation strategies impact you, and (4) do you think the Hooded Plover is important?

Mentions: Respondents reported little inconvenience to 15 conservation actions (Table 1). Control of introduced pests, and use of wooden shelters, temporary notices and signs around breeding sites were favoured. Permanently fencing off dunes or temporarily closing an access path were considered slightly less convenient. Factor analysis revealed two reliable factors (themes) that explained the variance in how respondents were personally impacted by conservation actions (Table 2; Figure 1). Mean scores differed between factors (within-subject factor, F1,520 = 218.129, p < 0.001) with exclusion and regulations considered less favourable than on-ground protection measures (except for prohibition of dune boarding).


Stakeholder Perceptions of Threatened Species and Their Management on Urban Beaches.

Maguire GS, Rimmer JM, Weston MA - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Mean scores (± one standard error) for each factor (theme) as revealed by factor analysis for four separate questions: (1) how serious do you think each threat is, (2) how effective do you think these conservation strategies would be at helping the birds, (3) to what degree would these conservation strategies impact you, and (4) do you think the Hooded Plover is important?
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494362&req=5

animals-03-01002-f001: Mean scores (± one standard error) for each factor (theme) as revealed by factor analysis for four separate questions: (1) how serious do you think each threat is, (2) how effective do you think these conservation strategies would be at helping the birds, (3) to what degree would these conservation strategies impact you, and (4) do you think the Hooded Plover is important?
Mentions: Respondents reported little inconvenience to 15 conservation actions (Table 1). Control of introduced pests, and use of wooden shelters, temporary notices and signs around breeding sites were favoured. Permanently fencing off dunes or temporarily closing an access path were considered slightly less convenient. Factor analysis revealed two reliable factors (themes) that explained the variance in how respondents were personally impacted by conservation actions (Table 2; Figure 1). Mean scores differed between factors (within-subject factor, F1,520 = 218.129, p < 0.001) with exclusion and regulations considered less favourable than on-ground protection measures (except for prohibition of dune boarding).

Bottom Line: More frequent beach users had greater awareness of the species and their plight but reported greater inconvenience associated with management.Dog walkers reported more inconvenience associated with exclusions and regulations than non-dog walkers.Dog walkers who used the beach infrequently rated threats significantly higher than frequent beach users.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: BirdLife Australia, Suite 2-05, The Green Building, 60 Leicester Street, Carlton, VIC 3053, Australia. grainne.maguire@birdlife.org.au.

ABSTRACT
We surveyed 579 recreationists regarding management of the threatened, beach-dwelling Hooded Plover Thinornis rubricollis. We postulated that: (1) lower awareness of the species and higher 'inconvenience' of management would engender less favourable perceptions of conservation and management; and (2) that frequency of beach use and dog ownership may mediate perceptions and levels of awareness and inconvenience. Overall, inconvenience was low while awareness and support for plover conservation were high. Education and awareness strategies were considered less effective than regulations; exclusion and regulations were considered less desirable than on-ground protective measures. Awareness, frequency of beach use and dog walking did not influence the perceived effectiveness of different managements. More frequent beach users had greater awareness of the species and their plight but reported greater inconvenience associated with management. Respondents with high awareness rated the severity of human-related threats higher; low awareness was associated with more inconvenience associated with on-ground protection, and exclusion and regulations. Dog walkers reported more inconvenience associated with exclusions and regulations than non-dog walkers. Dog walkers who used the beach infrequently rated threats significantly higher than frequent beach users. Conservation and education strategies could usefully be tailored to beach users' level of use and pet ownership.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus