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Influenza Vaccination Strategies: Comparing Inactivated and Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccines.

Sridhar S, Brokstad KA, Cox RJ - Vaccines (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: The inactivated vaccines are licensed from 6 months of age and have been used for more than 50 years with a good safety profile.In contrast, the live attenuated vaccines are licensed in Europe for children from 2-17 years of age and provide a multifaceted immune response with local and systemic antibody and T cell responses but with no clear correlate of protection.Here we discuss the immunological immune responses elicited by the two vaccines and discuss future work to better define correlates of protection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Jenner Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7DQ, UK. Saranya.sridhar@ndm.ox.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Influenza is a major respiratory pathogen causing annual outbreaks and occasional pandemics. Influenza vaccination is the major method of prophylaxis. Currently annual influenza vaccination is recommended for groups at high risk of complications from influenza infection such as pregnant women, young children, people with underlying disease and the elderly, along with occupational groups such a healthcare workers and farm workers. There are two main types of vaccines available: the parenteral inactivated influenza vaccine and the intranasal live attenuated influenza vaccine. The inactivated vaccines are licensed from 6 months of age and have been used for more than 50 years with a good safety profile. Inactivated vaccines are standardized according to the presence of the viral major surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin and protection is mediated by the induction of vaccine strain specific antibody responses. In contrast, the live attenuated vaccines are licensed in Europe for children from 2-17 years of age and provide a multifaceted immune response with local and systemic antibody and T cell responses but with no clear correlate of protection. Here we discuss the immunological immune responses elicited by the two vaccines and discuss future work to better define correlates of protection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The different formulations of influenza vaccine. Currently licensed influenza vaccines are predominately inactivated virus (whole inactivated, split, subunit or virion like particle) or live attenuated influenza vaccine. Novel vaccines are DNA or synthetic peptide vaccines.
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vaccines-03-00373-f002: The different formulations of influenza vaccine. Currently licensed influenza vaccines are predominately inactivated virus (whole inactivated, split, subunit or virion like particle) or live attenuated influenza vaccine. Novel vaccines are DNA or synthetic peptide vaccines.

Mentions: Annual influenza vaccination recommended for target groups are either inactivated vaccines or, more recently, live attenuated vaccines (Figure 2). Inactivated vaccines are either split virus, subunit vaccines or recombinant HA based vaccines that are administered parenterally. The vaccines are standardized according to the quantity of hemagglutinin, commonly 15 μg HA per strain, although high dose vaccines have recently been licensed for the elderly containing 60 μg HA per strain [3]. Adjuvants like oil in water (MF5 and AS03) increase the immunogenicity of the vaccine and are particularly used in the elderly, and for pandemic vaccines to spare doses [4]. Inactivated vaccines have an excellent safety profile, are recommended for children from 6 months of age, the elderly, asthmatics and those with other high risk conditions (Table 1).


Influenza Vaccination Strategies: Comparing Inactivated and Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccines.

Sridhar S, Brokstad KA, Cox RJ - Vaccines (Basel) (2015)

The different formulations of influenza vaccine. Currently licensed influenza vaccines are predominately inactivated virus (whole inactivated, split, subunit or virion like particle) or live attenuated influenza vaccine. Novel vaccines are DNA or synthetic peptide vaccines.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494344&req=5

vaccines-03-00373-f002: The different formulations of influenza vaccine. Currently licensed influenza vaccines are predominately inactivated virus (whole inactivated, split, subunit or virion like particle) or live attenuated influenza vaccine. Novel vaccines are DNA or synthetic peptide vaccines.
Mentions: Annual influenza vaccination recommended for target groups are either inactivated vaccines or, more recently, live attenuated vaccines (Figure 2). Inactivated vaccines are either split virus, subunit vaccines or recombinant HA based vaccines that are administered parenterally. The vaccines are standardized according to the quantity of hemagglutinin, commonly 15 μg HA per strain, although high dose vaccines have recently been licensed for the elderly containing 60 μg HA per strain [3]. Adjuvants like oil in water (MF5 and AS03) increase the immunogenicity of the vaccine and are particularly used in the elderly, and for pandemic vaccines to spare doses [4]. Inactivated vaccines have an excellent safety profile, are recommended for children from 6 months of age, the elderly, asthmatics and those with other high risk conditions (Table 1).

Bottom Line: The inactivated vaccines are licensed from 6 months of age and have been used for more than 50 years with a good safety profile.In contrast, the live attenuated vaccines are licensed in Europe for children from 2-17 years of age and provide a multifaceted immune response with local and systemic antibody and T cell responses but with no clear correlate of protection.Here we discuss the immunological immune responses elicited by the two vaccines and discuss future work to better define correlates of protection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Jenner Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7DQ, UK. Saranya.sridhar@ndm.ox.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Influenza is a major respiratory pathogen causing annual outbreaks and occasional pandemics. Influenza vaccination is the major method of prophylaxis. Currently annual influenza vaccination is recommended for groups at high risk of complications from influenza infection such as pregnant women, young children, people with underlying disease and the elderly, along with occupational groups such a healthcare workers and farm workers. There are two main types of vaccines available: the parenteral inactivated influenza vaccine and the intranasal live attenuated influenza vaccine. The inactivated vaccines are licensed from 6 months of age and have been used for more than 50 years with a good safety profile. Inactivated vaccines are standardized according to the presence of the viral major surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin and protection is mediated by the induction of vaccine strain specific antibody responses. In contrast, the live attenuated vaccines are licensed in Europe for children from 2-17 years of age and provide a multifaceted immune response with local and systemic antibody and T cell responses but with no clear correlate of protection. Here we discuss the immunological immune responses elicited by the two vaccines and discuss future work to better define correlates of protection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus