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Assessing Food Preferences in Dogs and Cats: A Review of the Current Methods.

Tobie C, Péron F, Larose C - Animals (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: Palatability-foods' characteristics enticing animals and leading them to consumption-is therefore a key element to look at.Based on the type of information needed, different pet populations (expert or naïve) can be tested to access their preference and acceptance for different food products.Classical techniques are the one-bowl and two-bowl tests, but complementary (i.e., operant conditioning) and novel (i.e., exploratory behavior) approaches are available to gather more information on the evaluation of petfood palatability.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: SPF Diana, ZA du Gohélis, Elven 56250, France. ctobie@diana-petfood.com.

ABSTRACT
Food is a major aspect of pet care; therefore, ensuring that pet foods are not only healthful but attractive to companion animals and their owners is essential. The petfood market remains active and requires ongoing evaluation of the adaptation and efficiency of the new products. Palatability-foods' characteristics enticing animals and leading them to consumption-is therefore a key element to look at. Based on the type of information needed, different pet populations (expert or naïve) can be tested to access their preference and acceptance for different food products. Classical techniques are the one-bowl and two-bowl tests, but complementary (i.e., operant conditioning) and novel (i.e., exploratory behavior) approaches are available to gather more information on the evaluation of petfood palatability.

No MeSH data available.


Evaluation of diets M, W1 and W2 by a Liking test conducted on an expert panel (n = 38, Panelis) (A) consumption ratio, (B) finished bowls and (C) consumption of the diets expressed relative to a reference consumption. Differing letters identify significant differences between the products.
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animals-05-00126-f003: Evaluation of diets M, W1 and W2 by a Liking test conducted on an expert panel (n = 38, Panelis) (A) consumption ratio, (B) finished bowls and (C) consumption of the diets expressed relative to a reference consumption. Differing letters identify significant differences between the products.

Mentions: The Liking test consists of a one-bowl test with adjusted food quantities, which enables the animal to finish the bowl infrequently, and available for a preset period of time [22]. The monitored indicators reflect meaningful criteria for owners in the understanding of their pets’ feeding enjoyment: the percentage of finished bowls and refusals; the consumption speed; and the gap with the reference consumption rate (RCR) of each individual (see Figure 3). The RCR consists of the ratio between the individual level of consumption at the test and the individual reference consumption based on its food intake history and other natural variations (season, meal of the day, etc.). The analysis of the deviation is reported for the all panel. If the difference is significant and negative: individuals of the panel did not like the food (or at least eat less than usual) and on the contrary if the difference is significant and positive, individuals enjoyed their food.


Assessing Food Preferences in Dogs and Cats: A Review of the Current Methods.

Tobie C, Péron F, Larose C - Animals (Basel) (2015)

Evaluation of diets M, W1 and W2 by a Liking test conducted on an expert panel (n = 38, Panelis) (A) consumption ratio, (B) finished bowls and (C) consumption of the diets expressed relative to a reference consumption. Differing letters identify significant differences between the products.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494339&req=5

animals-05-00126-f003: Evaluation of diets M, W1 and W2 by a Liking test conducted on an expert panel (n = 38, Panelis) (A) consumption ratio, (B) finished bowls and (C) consumption of the diets expressed relative to a reference consumption. Differing letters identify significant differences between the products.
Mentions: The Liking test consists of a one-bowl test with adjusted food quantities, which enables the animal to finish the bowl infrequently, and available for a preset period of time [22]. The monitored indicators reflect meaningful criteria for owners in the understanding of their pets’ feeding enjoyment: the percentage of finished bowls and refusals; the consumption speed; and the gap with the reference consumption rate (RCR) of each individual (see Figure 3). The RCR consists of the ratio between the individual level of consumption at the test and the individual reference consumption based on its food intake history and other natural variations (season, meal of the day, etc.). The analysis of the deviation is reported for the all panel. If the difference is significant and negative: individuals of the panel did not like the food (or at least eat less than usual) and on the contrary if the difference is significant and positive, individuals enjoyed their food.

Bottom Line: Palatability-foods' characteristics enticing animals and leading them to consumption-is therefore a key element to look at.Based on the type of information needed, different pet populations (expert or naïve) can be tested to access their preference and acceptance for different food products.Classical techniques are the one-bowl and two-bowl tests, but complementary (i.e., operant conditioning) and novel (i.e., exploratory behavior) approaches are available to gather more information on the evaluation of petfood palatability.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: SPF Diana, ZA du Gohélis, Elven 56250, France. ctobie@diana-petfood.com.

ABSTRACT
Food is a major aspect of pet care; therefore, ensuring that pet foods are not only healthful but attractive to companion animals and their owners is essential. The petfood market remains active and requires ongoing evaluation of the adaptation and efficiency of the new products. Palatability-foods' characteristics enticing animals and leading them to consumption-is therefore a key element to look at. Based on the type of information needed, different pet populations (expert or naïve) can be tested to access their preference and acceptance for different food products. Classical techniques are the one-bowl and two-bowl tests, but complementary (i.e., operant conditioning) and novel (i.e., exploratory behavior) approaches are available to gather more information on the evaluation of petfood palatability.

No MeSH data available.