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Assessing Food Preferences in Dogs and Cats: A Review of the Current Methods.

Tobie C, Péron F, Larose C - Animals (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: Palatability-foods' characteristics enticing animals and leading them to consumption-is therefore a key element to look at.Based on the type of information needed, different pet populations (expert or naïve) can be tested to access their preference and acceptance for different food products.Classical techniques are the one-bowl and two-bowl tests, but complementary (i.e., operant conditioning) and novel (i.e., exploratory behavior) approaches are available to gather more information on the evaluation of petfood palatability.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: SPF Diana, ZA du Gohélis, Elven 56250, France. ctobie@diana-petfood.com.

ABSTRACT
Food is a major aspect of pet care; therefore, ensuring that pet foods are not only healthful but attractive to companion animals and their owners is essential. The petfood market remains active and requires ongoing evaluation of the adaptation and efficiency of the new products. Palatability-foods' characteristics enticing animals and leading them to consumption-is therefore a key element to look at. Based on the type of information needed, different pet populations (expert or naïve) can be tested to access their preference and acceptance for different food products. Classical techniques are the one-bowl and two-bowl tests, but complementary (i.e., operant conditioning) and novel (i.e., exploratory behavior) approaches are available to gather more information on the evaluation of petfood palatability.

No MeSH data available.


Average consumption ratio and Panelis quality test in cats, A = B, May 2014, 2 days by panel (n = 27–40 per group). None significant (NS) results expected.
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animals-05-00126-f001: Average consumption ratio and Panelis quality test in cats, A = B, May 2014, 2 days by panel (n = 27–40 per group). None significant (NS) results expected.

Mentions: Quality tests should be conducted regularly in expert panels to control for any side bias. In this type of test, the animals are offered the same food and the expected outcome is to observe no significant difference (see Figure 1).


Assessing Food Preferences in Dogs and Cats: A Review of the Current Methods.

Tobie C, Péron F, Larose C - Animals (Basel) (2015)

Average consumption ratio and Panelis quality test in cats, A = B, May 2014, 2 days by panel (n = 27–40 per group). None significant (NS) results expected.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494339&req=5

animals-05-00126-f001: Average consumption ratio and Panelis quality test in cats, A = B, May 2014, 2 days by panel (n = 27–40 per group). None significant (NS) results expected.
Mentions: Quality tests should be conducted regularly in expert panels to control for any side bias. In this type of test, the animals are offered the same food and the expected outcome is to observe no significant difference (see Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Palatability-foods' characteristics enticing animals and leading them to consumption-is therefore a key element to look at.Based on the type of information needed, different pet populations (expert or naïve) can be tested to access their preference and acceptance for different food products.Classical techniques are the one-bowl and two-bowl tests, but complementary (i.e., operant conditioning) and novel (i.e., exploratory behavior) approaches are available to gather more information on the evaluation of petfood palatability.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: SPF Diana, ZA du Gohélis, Elven 56250, France. ctobie@diana-petfood.com.

ABSTRACT
Food is a major aspect of pet care; therefore, ensuring that pet foods are not only healthful but attractive to companion animals and their owners is essential. The petfood market remains active and requires ongoing evaluation of the adaptation and efficiency of the new products. Palatability-foods' characteristics enticing animals and leading them to consumption-is therefore a key element to look at. Based on the type of information needed, different pet populations (expert or naïve) can be tested to access their preference and acceptance for different food products. Classical techniques are the one-bowl and two-bowl tests, but complementary (i.e., operant conditioning) and novel (i.e., exploratory behavior) approaches are available to gather more information on the evaluation of petfood palatability.

No MeSH data available.