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Selecting a Conservation Surrogate Species for Small Fragmented Habitats Using Ecological Niche Modelling.

Nekaris KA, Arnell AP, Svensson MS - Animals (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: We tested these for umbrella characteristics against the original shortlist, utilizing Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modelling, and analysed distribution overlap using ArcGIS.The criteria highlighted Loris tardigradus tardigradus and Prionailurus viverrinus as finalists, with the former having highest flagship potential.We suggest Cinderella species can be effective conservation surrogates especially in habitats where traditional flagship species have been extirpated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nocturnal Primate Research Group, Department of Social Sciences, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, OX3 0BP, UK. anekaris@brookes.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Flagship species are traditionally large, charismatic animals used to rally conservation efforts. Accepted flagship definitions suggest they need only fulfil a strategic role, unlike umbrella species that are used to shelter cohabitant taxa. The criteria used to select both flagship and umbrella species may not stand up in the face of dramatic forest loss, where remaining fragments may only contain species that do not suit either set of criteria. The Cinderella species concept covers aesthetically pleasing and overlooked species that fulfil the criteria of flagships or umbrellas. Such species are also more likely to occur in fragmented habitats. We tested Cinderella criteria on mammals in the fragmented forests of the Sri Lankan Wet Zone. We selected taxa that fulfilled both strategic and ecological roles. We created a shortlist of ten species, and from a survey of local perceptions highlighted two finalists. We tested these for umbrella characteristics against the original shortlist, utilizing Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modelling, and analysed distribution overlap using ArcGIS. The criteria highlighted Loris tardigradus tardigradus and Prionailurus viverrinus as finalists, with the former having highest flagship potential. We suggest Cinderella species can be effective conservation surrogates especially in habitats where traditional flagship species have been extirpated.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Maxent-generated predicted and remnant distributions of Loris tardigradus tardigradus and Prionailurus viverrinus, the two taxa with the highest overlap efficiency.
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animals-05-00027-f003: Maxent-generated predicted and remnant distributions of Loris tardigradus tardigradus and Prionailurus viverrinus, the two taxa with the highest overlap efficiency.

Mentions: According to their AUC curves, all ten models performed better than random (>0.50). The Sri Lankan giant squirrel (Ratufa macroura melanochra) scored highest (0.96); whereas P. viverrinus performed least favourably (0.70). The distribution of each candidate within the study area varied widely P. viverrinus and M. kathygre had the highest distribution overall, each covering 34% of the study area, L. t. tardigradus covered approximately half this and the lowest distribution was T. v. vetulus, covering only 7.7% of the area (Figure 3).


Selecting a Conservation Surrogate Species for Small Fragmented Habitats Using Ecological Niche Modelling.

Nekaris KA, Arnell AP, Svensson MS - Animals (Basel) (2015)

Maxent-generated predicted and remnant distributions of Loris tardigradus tardigradus and Prionailurus viverrinus, the two taxa with the highest overlap efficiency.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494338&req=5

animals-05-00027-f003: Maxent-generated predicted and remnant distributions of Loris tardigradus tardigradus and Prionailurus viverrinus, the two taxa with the highest overlap efficiency.
Mentions: According to their AUC curves, all ten models performed better than random (>0.50). The Sri Lankan giant squirrel (Ratufa macroura melanochra) scored highest (0.96); whereas P. viverrinus performed least favourably (0.70). The distribution of each candidate within the study area varied widely P. viverrinus and M. kathygre had the highest distribution overall, each covering 34% of the study area, L. t. tardigradus covered approximately half this and the lowest distribution was T. v. vetulus, covering only 7.7% of the area (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: We tested these for umbrella characteristics against the original shortlist, utilizing Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modelling, and analysed distribution overlap using ArcGIS.The criteria highlighted Loris tardigradus tardigradus and Prionailurus viverrinus as finalists, with the former having highest flagship potential.We suggest Cinderella species can be effective conservation surrogates especially in habitats where traditional flagship species have been extirpated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nocturnal Primate Research Group, Department of Social Sciences, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, OX3 0BP, UK. anekaris@brookes.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Flagship species are traditionally large, charismatic animals used to rally conservation efforts. Accepted flagship definitions suggest they need only fulfil a strategic role, unlike umbrella species that are used to shelter cohabitant taxa. The criteria used to select both flagship and umbrella species may not stand up in the face of dramatic forest loss, where remaining fragments may only contain species that do not suit either set of criteria. The Cinderella species concept covers aesthetically pleasing and overlooked species that fulfil the criteria of flagships or umbrellas. Such species are also more likely to occur in fragmented habitats. We tested Cinderella criteria on mammals in the fragmented forests of the Sri Lankan Wet Zone. We selected taxa that fulfilled both strategic and ecological roles. We created a shortlist of ten species, and from a survey of local perceptions highlighted two finalists. We tested these for umbrella characteristics against the original shortlist, utilizing Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modelling, and analysed distribution overlap using ArcGIS. The criteria highlighted Loris tardigradus tardigradus and Prionailurus viverrinus as finalists, with the former having highest flagship potential. We suggest Cinderella species can be effective conservation surrogates especially in habitats where traditional flagship species have been extirpated.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus