Limits...
Pet Food Palatability Evaluation: A Review of Standard Assay Techniques and Interpretation of Results with a Primary Focus on Limitations.

Aldrich GC, Koppel K - Animals (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: The pet food industry continues to grow steadily as a result of new innovative products.Pet food palatability is most commonly measured using a single-bowl or a two-bowl assay.While these tests answer some questions about the animals' perception of the food, there are many limitations as well.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Grain Science and Industry, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA. aldrich4@ksu.edu.

ABSTRACT
The pet food industry continues to grow steadily as a result of new innovative products. Quality control and product development tests for pet foods are typically conducted through palatability testing with dogs and cats. Palatability is the measure of intake of a food that indicates acceptance or the measure of preference of one food over another. Pet food palatability is most commonly measured using a single-bowl or a two-bowl assay. While these tests answer some questions about the animals' perception of the food, there are many limitations as well. This review addresses some of these limitations and indicates opportunities for future research.

No MeSH data available.


Food intake (g) in a single-bowl test.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494336&req=5

animals-05-00043-f001: Food intake (g) in a single-bowl test.

Mentions: An example of a single bowl test is shown in Figure 1. Using hypothetical data 4 small dogs are each presented with one bowl of food that should support their daily caloric needs. Dogs 1 and 2 are presented with Food 1 on days 1–5 and Dogs 3 and 4 are presented with Food 2 on days 1–5. Then Foods 1 and 2 are switched for the dog pairs on days 6–10. From this evidence it can be seen that Food 2 is novel and there is some initial adjustment to its consumption by each of the dogs. The dogs accepted Food 1, but overall consumption was 81% of that of the Food 2. An intake ratio [Food 1/(Food 1 + Food 2)] of 0.50 would represent equivalent consumption. In this case the Intake ratio (IR) for Food 1 was greater than 0.50 at 0.55 which would lead one to conclude that it was consumed at a greater quantity after accounting for the period effect (Table 1).


Pet Food Palatability Evaluation: A Review of Standard Assay Techniques and Interpretation of Results with a Primary Focus on Limitations.

Aldrich GC, Koppel K - Animals (Basel) (2015)

Food intake (g) in a single-bowl test.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494336&req=5

animals-05-00043-f001: Food intake (g) in a single-bowl test.
Mentions: An example of a single bowl test is shown in Figure 1. Using hypothetical data 4 small dogs are each presented with one bowl of food that should support their daily caloric needs. Dogs 1 and 2 are presented with Food 1 on days 1–5 and Dogs 3 and 4 are presented with Food 2 on days 1–5. Then Foods 1 and 2 are switched for the dog pairs on days 6–10. From this evidence it can be seen that Food 2 is novel and there is some initial adjustment to its consumption by each of the dogs. The dogs accepted Food 1, but overall consumption was 81% of that of the Food 2. An intake ratio [Food 1/(Food 1 + Food 2)] of 0.50 would represent equivalent consumption. In this case the Intake ratio (IR) for Food 1 was greater than 0.50 at 0.55 which would lead one to conclude that it was consumed at a greater quantity after accounting for the period effect (Table 1).

Bottom Line: The pet food industry continues to grow steadily as a result of new innovative products.Pet food palatability is most commonly measured using a single-bowl or a two-bowl assay.While these tests answer some questions about the animals' perception of the food, there are many limitations as well.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Grain Science and Industry, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA. aldrich4@ksu.edu.

ABSTRACT
The pet food industry continues to grow steadily as a result of new innovative products. Quality control and product development tests for pet foods are typically conducted through palatability testing with dogs and cats. Palatability is the measure of intake of a food that indicates acceptance or the measure of preference of one food over another. Pet food palatability is most commonly measured using a single-bowl or a two-bowl assay. While these tests answer some questions about the animals' perception of the food, there are many limitations as well. This review addresses some of these limitations and indicates opportunities for future research.

No MeSH data available.