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The Choice of Diet Affects the Oral Health of the Domestic Cat.

Mata F - Animals (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: Teeth type (p < 0.001) and diet (p < 0.001) were found to be significant, however, age was not (p > 0.05).The probability of poor oral health is lower in the incisors of young or adult cats, fed a dry diet in comparison to the cheek teeth of older cats fed a wet diet.It is argued that cats' oral health may be promoted with an early age hygiene of the cheek teeth and with provision of abrasive dry food.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU, UK. fernando.da-mata@newcastle.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
In this cross-sectional study, the gingivitis and the calculus indices of the teeth of N = 41 cats were used to model oral health as a dependent variable using a Poisson regression. The independent variables used were "quadrant", "teeth type", "age", and "diet". Teeth type (p < 0.001) and diet (p < 0.001) were found to be significant, however, age was not (p > 0.05). Interactions were all significant: age x teeth (p < 0.01), age × diet (p < 0.01), teeth × diet (p < 0.001), and teeth × age × diet (p < 0.001). The probability of poor oral health is lower in the incisors of young or adult cats, fed a dry diet in comparison to the cheek teeth of older cats fed a wet diet. Diet has a higher contribution to poor oral health than age. It is argued that cats' oral health may be promoted with an early age hygiene of the cheek teeth and with provision of abrasive dry food.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The TRIDAN modified system for cat teeth classification. Adapted from Crossley [12].
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animals-05-00101-f001: The TRIDAN modified system for cat teeth classification. Adapted from Crossley [12].

Mentions: Data were organised by quadrant (“side”—left or right, and “position”—maxilla or mandible) and “type of teeth” (incisors, canines, premolars, and molars). Teeth nomenclature used the TRIDAN modified system [11], according to Figure 1. Averages for CI and GI were calculated between: 101, 102, and 103 for upper right incisors; 201, 201, and 203 for upper left incisors; 301, 302, and 303 for lower left incisors; 401, 402, and 403 for lower right incisors; 106, 107, and 108 for upper right premolars; 206, 207, and 208 for upper left premolars; 307 and 308 for lower left premolars; and 407 and 408 for lower right premolars. For canines and molars, the values entered were those assessed as only one of these tooth types exist per quadrant. Finally, GI and CI were added together to create the variable teeth health status (THS). Values were rounded to the nearest unit and ranged from 0 to 6, as both CI and GI ranged from 0 to 3.


The Choice of Diet Affects the Oral Health of the Domestic Cat.

Mata F - Animals (Basel) (2015)

The TRIDAN modified system for cat teeth classification. Adapted from Crossley [12].
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494333&req=5

animals-05-00101-f001: The TRIDAN modified system for cat teeth classification. Adapted from Crossley [12].
Mentions: Data were organised by quadrant (“side”—left or right, and “position”—maxilla or mandible) and “type of teeth” (incisors, canines, premolars, and molars). Teeth nomenclature used the TRIDAN modified system [11], according to Figure 1. Averages for CI and GI were calculated between: 101, 102, and 103 for upper right incisors; 201, 201, and 203 for upper left incisors; 301, 302, and 303 for lower left incisors; 401, 402, and 403 for lower right incisors; 106, 107, and 108 for upper right premolars; 206, 207, and 208 for upper left premolars; 307 and 308 for lower left premolars; and 407 and 408 for lower right premolars. For canines and molars, the values entered were those assessed as only one of these tooth types exist per quadrant. Finally, GI and CI were added together to create the variable teeth health status (THS). Values were rounded to the nearest unit and ranged from 0 to 6, as both CI and GI ranged from 0 to 3.

Bottom Line: Teeth type (p < 0.001) and diet (p < 0.001) were found to be significant, however, age was not (p > 0.05).The probability of poor oral health is lower in the incisors of young or adult cats, fed a dry diet in comparison to the cheek teeth of older cats fed a wet diet.It is argued that cats' oral health may be promoted with an early age hygiene of the cheek teeth and with provision of abrasive dry food.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU, UK. fernando.da-mata@newcastle.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
In this cross-sectional study, the gingivitis and the calculus indices of the teeth of N = 41 cats were used to model oral health as a dependent variable using a Poisson regression. The independent variables used were "quadrant", "teeth type", "age", and "diet". Teeth type (p < 0.001) and diet (p < 0.001) were found to be significant, however, age was not (p > 0.05). Interactions were all significant: age x teeth (p < 0.01), age × diet (p < 0.01), teeth × diet (p < 0.001), and teeth × age × diet (p < 0.001). The probability of poor oral health is lower in the incisors of young or adult cats, fed a dry diet in comparison to the cheek teeth of older cats fed a wet diet. Diet has a higher contribution to poor oral health than age. It is argued that cats' oral health may be promoted with an early age hygiene of the cheek teeth and with provision of abrasive dry food.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus