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Supplementation of Ascorbic Acid in Weanling Horses Following Prolonged Transportation.

Ralston S, Stives M - Animals (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: Supplementation caused slight (P < 0.2) increases in plasma ascorbic acid concentrations.Both supplemented groups had decreased (P < 0.05) plasma concentrations for 1 to 3 weeks following cessation of supplementation, possibly due to increased renal excretion or suppressed hepatic synthesis.Supplementation of ascorbic acid following prolonged stress will increase plasma concentrations, but prolonged supplementation should be avoided.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Animal Sciences, School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 84 Lipman Drive, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA. ralston@aesop.rutgers.edu.

ABSTRACT
Though horses synthesize ascorbic acid in their liver in amounts that meet their needs under normal circumstances, prolonged stress results in low plasma concentrations due to enhanced utilization and renal excretion and can reduce immune function. It was hypothesized that plasma ascorbic acid could be maintained in weanling horses by oral supplementation following prolonged transportation. Weanlings were supplemented with no ascorbic acid (Tx 0: n = 4), 5 grams ascorbic acid twice daily for 5 days (Tx 1: n = 4) or for 10 days (Tx 2: n = 4) following >50 hours of transportation. Supplementation caused slight (P < 0.2) increases in plasma ascorbic acid concentrations. Both supplemented groups had decreased (P < 0.05) plasma concentrations for 1 to 3 weeks following cessation of supplementation, possibly due to increased renal excretion or suppressed hepatic synthesis. Supplementation of ascorbic acid following prolonged stress will increase plasma concentrations, but prolonged supplementation should be avoided.

No MeSH data available.


Plasma AA (mg/dL) by treatment group after arrival. Treatment 0 received only the carrier (unsupplemented applesauce), Treatment 1 supplementation of 5 g AA twice a day was stopped on day 5 post arrival and in Treatment 2 of 5 g AA twice a day was discontinued on day 10 after arrival. AA values are means ± SE.
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animals-02-00184-f001: Plasma AA (mg/dL) by treatment group after arrival. Treatment 0 received only the carrier (unsupplemented applesauce), Treatment 1 supplementation of 5 g AA twice a day was stopped on day 5 post arrival and in Treatment 2 of 5 g AA twice a day was discontinued on day 10 after arrival. AA values are means ± SE.

Mentions: Due to technical errors, plasma AA data for day 3 and week 5 are not available. By day 5 all but one of the horses were calm and showing no behavioral signs of stress other than resistance to venipuncture. Plasma AA results are presented in Table 1 and Figure 1. None of the weanlings had clinical signs of disease or elevated rectal temperatures during the study. At day 5 there was a only a numerical trend for horses in treatment 1 to have a higher plasma AA (P < 0.12) than the other two groups, which then decreased (P < 0.05) two days after supplementation in that group was stopped (day 7). On day 10 there was a numerical trend for plasma AA to be higher (P < 0.12) in treatment 2 horses, which had just received their last dose of supplement, than in the other two groups. Two days later, plasma AA was decreased (P < 0.05) in the treatment 2 group relative to the other two groups and remained lower (P < 0.05) relative to the others from day 19 through day 42 (P < 0.005).


Supplementation of Ascorbic Acid in Weanling Horses Following Prolonged Transportation.

Ralston S, Stives M - Animals (Basel) (2012)

Plasma AA (mg/dL) by treatment group after arrival. Treatment 0 received only the carrier (unsupplemented applesauce), Treatment 1 supplementation of 5 g AA twice a day was stopped on day 5 post arrival and in Treatment 2 of 5 g AA twice a day was discontinued on day 10 after arrival. AA values are means ± SE.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494327&req=5

animals-02-00184-f001: Plasma AA (mg/dL) by treatment group after arrival. Treatment 0 received only the carrier (unsupplemented applesauce), Treatment 1 supplementation of 5 g AA twice a day was stopped on day 5 post arrival and in Treatment 2 of 5 g AA twice a day was discontinued on day 10 after arrival. AA values are means ± SE.
Mentions: Due to technical errors, plasma AA data for day 3 and week 5 are not available. By day 5 all but one of the horses were calm and showing no behavioral signs of stress other than resistance to venipuncture. Plasma AA results are presented in Table 1 and Figure 1. None of the weanlings had clinical signs of disease or elevated rectal temperatures during the study. At day 5 there was a only a numerical trend for horses in treatment 1 to have a higher plasma AA (P < 0.12) than the other two groups, which then decreased (P < 0.05) two days after supplementation in that group was stopped (day 7). On day 10 there was a numerical trend for plasma AA to be higher (P < 0.12) in treatment 2 horses, which had just received their last dose of supplement, than in the other two groups. Two days later, plasma AA was decreased (P < 0.05) in the treatment 2 group relative to the other two groups and remained lower (P < 0.05) relative to the others from day 19 through day 42 (P < 0.005).

Bottom Line: Supplementation caused slight (P < 0.2) increases in plasma ascorbic acid concentrations.Both supplemented groups had decreased (P < 0.05) plasma concentrations for 1 to 3 weeks following cessation of supplementation, possibly due to increased renal excretion or suppressed hepatic synthesis.Supplementation of ascorbic acid following prolonged stress will increase plasma concentrations, but prolonged supplementation should be avoided.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Animal Sciences, School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 84 Lipman Drive, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA. ralston@aesop.rutgers.edu.

ABSTRACT
Though horses synthesize ascorbic acid in their liver in amounts that meet their needs under normal circumstances, prolonged stress results in low plasma concentrations due to enhanced utilization and renal excretion and can reduce immune function. It was hypothesized that plasma ascorbic acid could be maintained in weanling horses by oral supplementation following prolonged transportation. Weanlings were supplemented with no ascorbic acid (Tx 0: n = 4), 5 grams ascorbic acid twice daily for 5 days (Tx 1: n = 4) or for 10 days (Tx 2: n = 4) following >50 hours of transportation. Supplementation caused slight (P < 0.2) increases in plasma ascorbic acid concentrations. Both supplemented groups had decreased (P < 0.05) plasma concentrations for 1 to 3 weeks following cessation of supplementation, possibly due to increased renal excretion or suppressed hepatic synthesis. Supplementation of ascorbic acid following prolonged stress will increase plasma concentrations, but prolonged supplementation should be avoided.

No MeSH data available.