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Why Did You Choose This Pet?: Adopters and Pet Selection Preferences in Five Animal Shelters in the United States.

Weiss E, Miller K, Mohan-Gibbons H, Vela C - Animals (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: Most adopters stated that information about the animal from a staff member or volunteer was more important than information on cage cards, and health and behavior information was particularly important.Adopters found greater importance in interacting with the animal rather than viewing it in its kennel.The results of this study can be used by shelters to create better adoption matches, prioritize shelter resources and staff training, and potentially increase adoptions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Shelter Research and Development, Community Outreach, American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA®), 424 E. 92nd St., New York, NY 10128, USA. emily.weiss@aspca.org.

ABSTRACT
Responses from an adopter survey (n = 1,491) determined reasons for pet selection, type of information received by the adopter, and the context in which the animal's behavior was observed. Appearance of the animal, social behavior with adopter, and personality were the top reasons for adoption across species and age groups. Most adopters stated that information about the animal from a staff member or volunteer was more important than information on cage cards, and health and behavior information was particularly important. Adopters found greater importance in interacting with the animal rather than viewing it in its kennel. The results of this study can be used by shelters to create better adoption matches, prioritize shelter resources and staff training, and potentially increase adoptions. Additionally, some simple training techniques are suggested to facilitate adopter-friendly behaviors from sheltered dogs and cats.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Adopter survey given to all five animal shelters.
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animals-02-00144-f001: Adopter survey given to all five animal shelters.

Mentions: The survey consisted of seven questions to determine reasons for pet selection, type of information received and the way it was received, and the context in which the animal’s behavior was observed (Figure 1). For the visual analog rating scales for questions 7 and 8, the respondent placed a mark on a line representing the range between two anchor points, “Not important” and “Very important.” The distance from the origin of the line to the participant’s mark served to indicate the degree to which the item was perceived as important. The actual length of the available line varied somewhat due to differences in the participating shelters’ printers, resulting in line lengths that varied across shelters from 6.5 cm to 8.0 cm. The survey was pilot tested for clarity on several ASPCA® colleagues before finalizing the question format and then translated into Spanish by two native Spanish speakers. Immediately after adopters choose their pet, they were asked by a shelter staff or volunteer to complete the survey. Adopters were assured that filling out the survey was voluntary and that it would not affect their adoption. This information was also available in print at the top of the survey for adopters to read. They were offered the choice of completing the survey in English or Spanish. If a respondent was adopting more than one animal, he/she was asked to complete the survey for just one of the animals, of his/her choosing.


Why Did You Choose This Pet?: Adopters and Pet Selection Preferences in Five Animal Shelters in the United States.

Weiss E, Miller K, Mohan-Gibbons H, Vela C - Animals (Basel) (2012)

Adopter survey given to all five animal shelters.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494324&req=5

animals-02-00144-f001: Adopter survey given to all five animal shelters.
Mentions: The survey consisted of seven questions to determine reasons for pet selection, type of information received and the way it was received, and the context in which the animal’s behavior was observed (Figure 1). For the visual analog rating scales for questions 7 and 8, the respondent placed a mark on a line representing the range between two anchor points, “Not important” and “Very important.” The distance from the origin of the line to the participant’s mark served to indicate the degree to which the item was perceived as important. The actual length of the available line varied somewhat due to differences in the participating shelters’ printers, resulting in line lengths that varied across shelters from 6.5 cm to 8.0 cm. The survey was pilot tested for clarity on several ASPCA® colleagues before finalizing the question format and then translated into Spanish by two native Spanish speakers. Immediately after adopters choose their pet, they were asked by a shelter staff or volunteer to complete the survey. Adopters were assured that filling out the survey was voluntary and that it would not affect their adoption. This information was also available in print at the top of the survey for adopters to read. They were offered the choice of completing the survey in English or Spanish. If a respondent was adopting more than one animal, he/she was asked to complete the survey for just one of the animals, of his/her choosing.

Bottom Line: Most adopters stated that information about the animal from a staff member or volunteer was more important than information on cage cards, and health and behavior information was particularly important.Adopters found greater importance in interacting with the animal rather than viewing it in its kennel.The results of this study can be used by shelters to create better adoption matches, prioritize shelter resources and staff training, and potentially increase adoptions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Shelter Research and Development, Community Outreach, American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA®), 424 E. 92nd St., New York, NY 10128, USA. emily.weiss@aspca.org.

ABSTRACT
Responses from an adopter survey (n = 1,491) determined reasons for pet selection, type of information received by the adopter, and the context in which the animal's behavior was observed. Appearance of the animal, social behavior with adopter, and personality were the top reasons for adoption across species and age groups. Most adopters stated that information about the animal from a staff member or volunteer was more important than information on cage cards, and health and behavior information was particularly important. Adopters found greater importance in interacting with the animal rather than viewing it in its kennel. The results of this study can be used by shelters to create better adoption matches, prioritize shelter resources and staff training, and potentially increase adoptions. Additionally, some simple training techniques are suggested to facilitate adopter-friendly behaviors from sheltered dogs and cats.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus