Limits...
The Effects of Using a Ramp and Elevator to Load and Unload Trailers on the Behavior and Physiology of Piglets.

McGlone J, Sapkota A - Animals (Basel) (2014)

Bottom Line: Sitting, feeding and blood parameters did not show a significant treatment by time effect (p > 0.05).Standing behavior did not differ between CON and HAN piglets nor between RAM and ELE piglets (p > 0.05); however, CON and HAN piglets stood more than RAM and ELE piglets during treatment (p < 0.05).The heart rate of ELE piglets decreased 6.3% after treatment; whereas the heart rate of RAM piglets remained elevated 2.4% (p < 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Animal and Food Sciences, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409, USA. john.mcglone@ttu.edu.

ABSTRACT
Transport is an inevitable process in the modern U.S. swine industry. The loading process is a novel and potentially stressful experience. This study uses behavior, heart rate and leukocyte counts to compare stress one hour before, during and after loading via ramp or elevator. Piglets were held in a home pen (control (CON)), walked up and down an aisle (handled (HAN)), or walked to a truck and loaded via elevator (ELE) or ramp (RAM). Sitting, feeding and blood parameters did not show a significant treatment by time effect (p > 0.05). Standing behavior did not differ between CON and HAN piglets nor between RAM and ELE piglets (p > 0.05); however, CON and HAN piglets stood more than RAM and ELE piglets during treatment (p < 0.05). After treatment, drinking behavior was increased in RAM piglets (p < 0.05). The heart rate of ELE piglets decreased 6.3% after treatment; whereas the heart rate of RAM piglets remained elevated 2.4% (p < 0.05). In terms of heart rate, loading by elevator appears to be less stressful than loading by ramp.

No MeSH data available.


(a) Hydraulic lift elevator in the loading position. (b) Hydraulic lift elevator in the raised position.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494311&req=5

animals-04-00535-f001: (a) Hydraulic lift elevator in the loading position. (b) Hydraulic lift elevator in the raised position.

Mentions: This project was approved by the Texas Tech University Animal Care and Use Committee. All animals were housed in 2.1-m × 1.5-m pens with slatted floors at the Texas Tech Swine Research Farm near New Deal (Lubbock), Texas. Each pen contains 1 nipple waterer and a 3-hole feeder. Feed and water were provided ad libitum in the pens. Ventilation in the barn was via exhaust fan and ceiling louvers. A total of 120 weaned pigs of mixed commercial genetics, approximately 30 days of age, were used for this study. Pigs were randomly divided into 12 pens of 10 pigs each, 3 pens per treatment. Pigs were allowed to acclimatize to the new environment for 1 week before the study began. Four treatment groups were assigned: control (CON), handled (HAN), ramp (RAM) and elevator (ELE). CON piglets were not handled or moved from their pen. HAN pigs were moved out of the home pen, walked up and down the length of the aisle and then moved back into the home pen. HAN piglets were not held at the end of the aisle for any time period. RAM piglets were moved out of the home pen, walked down the aisle and then loaded onto the trailer using a ramp. ELE piglets were moved from their home pen, walked down the aisle and loaded onto the trailer using a hydraulic lift (Figure 1a,b). ELE and RAM piglets were held on the trailer (i.e., not transported) for 1 hour and then moved back off the trailer via the treatment method and back to their home pens. Feed and water were available ad libitum in the home pens. Water was not available in the alley nor on the trailer. The movement of the pigs was facilitated by the use of sorting boards in accordance with the Transport Quality Assurance program guidelines [9]. Each treatment had 3 replications. Replications were performed on the same day, with at least 1 hour of rest between replications.


The Effects of Using a Ramp and Elevator to Load and Unload Trailers on the Behavior and Physiology of Piglets.

McGlone J, Sapkota A - Animals (Basel) (2014)

(a) Hydraulic lift elevator in the loading position. (b) Hydraulic lift elevator in the raised position.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494311&req=5

animals-04-00535-f001: (a) Hydraulic lift elevator in the loading position. (b) Hydraulic lift elevator in the raised position.
Mentions: This project was approved by the Texas Tech University Animal Care and Use Committee. All animals were housed in 2.1-m × 1.5-m pens with slatted floors at the Texas Tech Swine Research Farm near New Deal (Lubbock), Texas. Each pen contains 1 nipple waterer and a 3-hole feeder. Feed and water were provided ad libitum in the pens. Ventilation in the barn was via exhaust fan and ceiling louvers. A total of 120 weaned pigs of mixed commercial genetics, approximately 30 days of age, were used for this study. Pigs were randomly divided into 12 pens of 10 pigs each, 3 pens per treatment. Pigs were allowed to acclimatize to the new environment for 1 week before the study began. Four treatment groups were assigned: control (CON), handled (HAN), ramp (RAM) and elevator (ELE). CON piglets were not handled or moved from their pen. HAN pigs were moved out of the home pen, walked up and down the length of the aisle and then moved back into the home pen. HAN piglets were not held at the end of the aisle for any time period. RAM piglets were moved out of the home pen, walked down the aisle and then loaded onto the trailer using a ramp. ELE piglets were moved from their home pen, walked down the aisle and loaded onto the trailer using a hydraulic lift (Figure 1a,b). ELE and RAM piglets were held on the trailer (i.e., not transported) for 1 hour and then moved back off the trailer via the treatment method and back to their home pens. Feed and water were available ad libitum in the home pens. Water was not available in the alley nor on the trailer. The movement of the pigs was facilitated by the use of sorting boards in accordance with the Transport Quality Assurance program guidelines [9]. Each treatment had 3 replications. Replications were performed on the same day, with at least 1 hour of rest between replications.

Bottom Line: Sitting, feeding and blood parameters did not show a significant treatment by time effect (p > 0.05).Standing behavior did not differ between CON and HAN piglets nor between RAM and ELE piglets (p > 0.05); however, CON and HAN piglets stood more than RAM and ELE piglets during treatment (p < 0.05).The heart rate of ELE piglets decreased 6.3% after treatment; whereas the heart rate of RAM piglets remained elevated 2.4% (p < 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Animal and Food Sciences, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409, USA. john.mcglone@ttu.edu.

ABSTRACT
Transport is an inevitable process in the modern U.S. swine industry. The loading process is a novel and potentially stressful experience. This study uses behavior, heart rate and leukocyte counts to compare stress one hour before, during and after loading via ramp or elevator. Piglets were held in a home pen (control (CON)), walked up and down an aisle (handled (HAN)), or walked to a truck and loaded via elevator (ELE) or ramp (RAM). Sitting, feeding and blood parameters did not show a significant treatment by time effect (p > 0.05). Standing behavior did not differ between CON and HAN piglets nor between RAM and ELE piglets (p > 0.05); however, CON and HAN piglets stood more than RAM and ELE piglets during treatment (p < 0.05). After treatment, drinking behavior was increased in RAM piglets (p < 0.05). The heart rate of ELE piglets decreased 6.3% after treatment; whereas the heart rate of RAM piglets remained elevated 2.4% (p < 0.05). In terms of heart rate, loading by elevator appears to be less stressful than loading by ramp.

No MeSH data available.