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Environmental and Anthropogenic Impacts on Avifaunal Assemblages in an Urban Parkland, 1976 to 2007.

Ormond SE, Whatmough R, Hudson IL, Daniels CB - Animals (Basel) (2014)

Bottom Line: Resident parkland birds demonstrated significant declines in abundance.Native and introduced species also exhibited long-term declines in species richness and abundance throughout the 32-year period.Cycles of varying time periods indicated fluctuations in avian biodiversity demonstrating the need for future monitoring and statistical analyses on bird communities in the Adelaide City parklands.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Natural and Built Environments, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, P.O. Box 2471, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia. sara.ormond@sa.gov.au.

ABSTRACT
Urban environments are unique, rapidly changing habitats in which almost half of the world's human population resides. The effects of urbanisation, such as habitat (vegetation) removal, pollution and modification of natural areas, commonly cause biodiversity loss. Long-term ecological monitoring of urban environments is vital to determine the composition and long-term trends of faunal communities. This paper provides a detailed view of long-term changes in avifaunal assemblages of the Adelaide City parklands and discusses the anthropogenic and environmental factors that contributed to the changes between 1976 and 2007. The Adelaide City parklands (ACP) comprise 760 ha of land surrounding Adelaide's central business district. Naturalist Robert Whatmough completed a 32-year survey of the ACP to determine the structure of the urban bird community residing there. Annual species richness and the abundance of birds in March and September months were analysed. Linear regression analysis was applied to species richness and abundance data of each assemblage. Resident parkland birds demonstrated significant declines in abundance. Native and introduced species also exhibited long-term declines in species richness and abundance throughout the 32-year period. Cycles of varying time periods indicated fluctuations in avian biodiversity demonstrating the need for future monitoring and statistical analyses on bird communities in the Adelaide City parklands.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The abundance of native birds in March and September months in the Adelaide City parklands from 1976 to 2007.
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animals-04-00119-f005: The abundance of native birds in March and September months in the Adelaide City parklands from 1976 to 2007.

Mentions: Linear regression analysis was performed on species richness data of native and introduced birds to determine long-term changes in native and introduced assemblages (Figure 4, Figure 5 and Figure 6). Native birds exhibited many small changes in species richness throughout the 32-year period (Figure 4 and Figure 5). Linear regression analysis indicated that native bird species in the parklands demonstrated a significant, negative relationship with the 32-year study period (R2 = 0.304, Sig. = 0.001). The R2 value indicated that this relationship was moderately strong. Linear regression analysis indicated a significant, negative relationship between introduced species in the parklands and the 32-year monitoring period (R2 = 0.471, Sig ≤ 0.001). The R2 value signified that this was a relatively strong relationship (Figure 4 and Figure 6).


Environmental and Anthropogenic Impacts on Avifaunal Assemblages in an Urban Parkland, 1976 to 2007.

Ormond SE, Whatmough R, Hudson IL, Daniels CB - Animals (Basel) (2014)

The abundance of native birds in March and September months in the Adelaide City parklands from 1976 to 2007.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494304&req=5

animals-04-00119-f005: The abundance of native birds in March and September months in the Adelaide City parklands from 1976 to 2007.
Mentions: Linear regression analysis was performed on species richness data of native and introduced birds to determine long-term changes in native and introduced assemblages (Figure 4, Figure 5 and Figure 6). Native birds exhibited many small changes in species richness throughout the 32-year period (Figure 4 and Figure 5). Linear regression analysis indicated that native bird species in the parklands demonstrated a significant, negative relationship with the 32-year study period (R2 = 0.304, Sig. = 0.001). The R2 value indicated that this relationship was moderately strong. Linear regression analysis indicated a significant, negative relationship between introduced species in the parklands and the 32-year monitoring period (R2 = 0.471, Sig ≤ 0.001). The R2 value signified that this was a relatively strong relationship (Figure 4 and Figure 6).

Bottom Line: Resident parkland birds demonstrated significant declines in abundance.Native and introduced species also exhibited long-term declines in species richness and abundance throughout the 32-year period.Cycles of varying time periods indicated fluctuations in avian biodiversity demonstrating the need for future monitoring and statistical analyses on bird communities in the Adelaide City parklands.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Natural and Built Environments, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, P.O. Box 2471, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia. sara.ormond@sa.gov.au.

ABSTRACT
Urban environments are unique, rapidly changing habitats in which almost half of the world's human population resides. The effects of urbanisation, such as habitat (vegetation) removal, pollution and modification of natural areas, commonly cause biodiversity loss. Long-term ecological monitoring of urban environments is vital to determine the composition and long-term trends of faunal communities. This paper provides a detailed view of long-term changes in avifaunal assemblages of the Adelaide City parklands and discusses the anthropogenic and environmental factors that contributed to the changes between 1976 and 2007. The Adelaide City parklands (ACP) comprise 760 ha of land surrounding Adelaide's central business district. Naturalist Robert Whatmough completed a 32-year survey of the ACP to determine the structure of the urban bird community residing there. Annual species richness and the abundance of birds in March and September months were analysed. Linear regression analysis was applied to species richness and abundance data of each assemblage. Resident parkland birds demonstrated significant declines in abundance. Native and introduced species also exhibited long-term declines in species richness and abundance throughout the 32-year period. Cycles of varying time periods indicated fluctuations in avian biodiversity demonstrating the need for future monitoring and statistical analyses on bird communities in the Adelaide City parklands.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus