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One Medicine, One Acupuncture.

Robinson NG - Animals (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: Functionally comparative innervation, in particular, should be similar between species, as the nerves initiate and mediate physiologic changes that result from point stimulation.If researchers choose points that activate different nerves in one species than in another, unpredictable outcomes may occur.Variability in point placement will impede progress and hamper the ability of researchers and clinicians to make meaningful comparisons across species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CSU Center for Comparative and Integrative Pain Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, 300 West Drake Road, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA. Narda.Robinson@colostate.edu.

ABSTRACT
"One Acupuncture", like "One Medicine", has the potential to improve research quality and clinical outcomes. However, while human acupuncture point locations have remained largely consistent over time, the veterinary versions remain imprecise and variable. Establishing anatomical criteria for veterinary acupuncture atlases in keeping with the human template will create congruence across species, benefiting both research and practice. Anatomic criteria for points based on objectively verifiable structures will facilitate translational research. Functionally comparative innervation, in particular, should be similar between species, as the nerves initiate and mediate physiologic changes that result from point stimulation. If researchers choose points that activate different nerves in one species than in another, unpredictable outcomes may occur. Variability in point placement will impede progress and hamper the ability of researchers and clinicians to make meaningful comparisons across species. This paper reveals incongruities that remain between human and veterinary acupuncture points, illustrating the need to analyze anatomical characteristics of each point to assure accuracy in selecting transpositional acupuncture locations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparative anatomy calls into question the transposition of many points from the human hand and foot to the equine digit. This image highlights distal points on the Large Intestine (LI) and Lung (LU) channels, all of which should likely be omitted in the horse. Specifically, this entails LI 1 through LI 4, LU 10, and LU 11. (Image courtesy of Narda G. Robinson, DO, DVM, MS and Teton NewMedia. From [17]).
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animals-02-00395-f006: Comparative anatomy calls into question the transposition of many points from the human hand and foot to the equine digit. This image highlights distal points on the Large Intestine (LI) and Lung (LU) channels, all of which should likely be omitted in the horse. Specifically, this entails LI 1 through LI 4, LU 10, and LU 11. (Image courtesy of Narda G. Robinson, DO, DVM, MS and Teton NewMedia. From [17]).

Mentions: Figure 6 offers an example of the number of points from two digits, the thumb and forefinger, that lack a rational reason to exist in the horse due to comparative anatomy characteristics.


One Medicine, One Acupuncture.

Robinson NG - Animals (Basel) (2012)

Comparative anatomy calls into question the transposition of many points from the human hand and foot to the equine digit. This image highlights distal points on the Large Intestine (LI) and Lung (LU) channels, all of which should likely be omitted in the horse. Specifically, this entails LI 1 through LI 4, LU 10, and LU 11. (Image courtesy of Narda G. Robinson, DO, DVM, MS and Teton NewMedia. From [17]).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494296&req=5

animals-02-00395-f006: Comparative anatomy calls into question the transposition of many points from the human hand and foot to the equine digit. This image highlights distal points on the Large Intestine (LI) and Lung (LU) channels, all of which should likely be omitted in the horse. Specifically, this entails LI 1 through LI 4, LU 10, and LU 11. (Image courtesy of Narda G. Robinson, DO, DVM, MS and Teton NewMedia. From [17]).
Mentions: Figure 6 offers an example of the number of points from two digits, the thumb and forefinger, that lack a rational reason to exist in the horse due to comparative anatomy characteristics.

Bottom Line: Functionally comparative innervation, in particular, should be similar between species, as the nerves initiate and mediate physiologic changes that result from point stimulation.If researchers choose points that activate different nerves in one species than in another, unpredictable outcomes may occur.Variability in point placement will impede progress and hamper the ability of researchers and clinicians to make meaningful comparisons across species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CSU Center for Comparative and Integrative Pain Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, 300 West Drake Road, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA. Narda.Robinson@colostate.edu.

ABSTRACT
"One Acupuncture", like "One Medicine", has the potential to improve research quality and clinical outcomes. However, while human acupuncture point locations have remained largely consistent over time, the veterinary versions remain imprecise and variable. Establishing anatomical criteria for veterinary acupuncture atlases in keeping with the human template will create congruence across species, benefiting both research and practice. Anatomic criteria for points based on objectively verifiable structures will facilitate translational research. Functionally comparative innervation, in particular, should be similar between species, as the nerves initiate and mediate physiologic changes that result from point stimulation. If researchers choose points that activate different nerves in one species than in another, unpredictable outcomes may occur. Variability in point placement will impede progress and hamper the ability of researchers and clinicians to make meaningful comparisons across species. This paper reveals incongruities that remain between human and veterinary acupuncture points, illustrating the need to analyze anatomical characteristics of each point to assure accuracy in selecting transpositional acupuncture locations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus