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One Medicine, One Acupuncture.

Robinson NG - Animals (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: Functionally comparative innervation, in particular, should be similar between species, as the nerves initiate and mediate physiologic changes that result from point stimulation.If researchers choose points that activate different nerves in one species than in another, unpredictable outcomes may occur.Variability in point placement will impede progress and hamper the ability of researchers and clinicians to make meaningful comparisons across species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CSU Center for Comparative and Integrative Pain Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, 300 West Drake Road, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA. Narda.Robinson@colostate.edu.

ABSTRACT
"One Acupuncture", like "One Medicine", has the potential to improve research quality and clinical outcomes. However, while human acupuncture point locations have remained largely consistent over time, the veterinary versions remain imprecise and variable. Establishing anatomical criteria for veterinary acupuncture atlases in keeping with the human template will create congruence across species, benefiting both research and practice. Anatomic criteria for points based on objectively verifiable structures will facilitate translational research. Functionally comparative innervation, in particular, should be similar between species, as the nerves initiate and mediate physiologic changes that result from point stimulation. If researchers choose points that activate different nerves in one species than in another, unpredictable outcomes may occur. Variability in point placement will impede progress and hamper the ability of researchers and clinicians to make meaningful comparisons across species. This paper reveals incongruities that remain between human and veterinary acupuncture points, illustrating the need to analyze anatomical characteristics of each point to assure accuracy in selecting transpositional acupuncture locations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Translational acupuncture research studies citing Bai Hui as one of the points stimulated may be referring to GV 20a, GV 20b, or GV5. The resultant confusion imposes hurdles for researchers who attempt to replicate the study in the same or other species, clinicians who try to achieve the outcomes claimed in the research trial, and physiologists who strive to interpret the mechanisms of action of Bai Hui stimulation. (Image courtesy of Narda G. Robinson, DO, DVM, MS and Colorado State University).
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animals-02-00395-f004: Translational acupuncture research studies citing Bai Hui as one of the points stimulated may be referring to GV 20a, GV 20b, or GV5. The resultant confusion imposes hurdles for researchers who attempt to replicate the study in the same or other species, clinicians who try to achieve the outcomes claimed in the research trial, and physiologists who strive to interpret the mechanisms of action of Bai Hui stimulation. (Image courtesy of Narda G. Robinson, DO, DVM, MS and Colorado State University).

Mentions: The Bai Hui point illustrates the issue. Bai Hui in humans refers to Governor Vessel 20 (GV 20, Bai Hui or “Hundred Convergences”) near the vertex of the skull (see Figure 3.) On the other hand, TCVM practitioners may variably place GV 20 at the lumbosacral space and refer to the site as either GV 20b or Bai Hui [30,31,32,33]. Studies where researchers included Bai Hui for analgesia may only refer to the name but not provide the anatomical location, specifying either a cranial or lumbosacral site [34]. Making matters worse, some have equated Bai Hui with Governor Vessel 5 (GV 5, Xuan Shu or “Suspended Pivot”), located between the first and second lumbar vertebrae [35]. Obviously, it becomes difficult to “make heads or tails” out of veterinary acupuncture anatomy when a point such as Bai Hui could be placed on the head, nearer to the tail, or somewhere in between. Figure 4 shows the myriad placements of Bai Hui in the nonhuman animal.


One Medicine, One Acupuncture.

Robinson NG - Animals (Basel) (2012)

Translational acupuncture research studies citing Bai Hui as one of the points stimulated may be referring to GV 20a, GV 20b, or GV5. The resultant confusion imposes hurdles for researchers who attempt to replicate the study in the same or other species, clinicians who try to achieve the outcomes claimed in the research trial, and physiologists who strive to interpret the mechanisms of action of Bai Hui stimulation. (Image courtesy of Narda G. Robinson, DO, DVM, MS and Colorado State University).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494296&req=5

animals-02-00395-f004: Translational acupuncture research studies citing Bai Hui as one of the points stimulated may be referring to GV 20a, GV 20b, or GV5. The resultant confusion imposes hurdles for researchers who attempt to replicate the study in the same or other species, clinicians who try to achieve the outcomes claimed in the research trial, and physiologists who strive to interpret the mechanisms of action of Bai Hui stimulation. (Image courtesy of Narda G. Robinson, DO, DVM, MS and Colorado State University).
Mentions: The Bai Hui point illustrates the issue. Bai Hui in humans refers to Governor Vessel 20 (GV 20, Bai Hui or “Hundred Convergences”) near the vertex of the skull (see Figure 3.) On the other hand, TCVM practitioners may variably place GV 20 at the lumbosacral space and refer to the site as either GV 20b or Bai Hui [30,31,32,33]. Studies where researchers included Bai Hui for analgesia may only refer to the name but not provide the anatomical location, specifying either a cranial or lumbosacral site [34]. Making matters worse, some have equated Bai Hui with Governor Vessel 5 (GV 5, Xuan Shu or “Suspended Pivot”), located between the first and second lumbar vertebrae [35]. Obviously, it becomes difficult to “make heads or tails” out of veterinary acupuncture anatomy when a point such as Bai Hui could be placed on the head, nearer to the tail, or somewhere in between. Figure 4 shows the myriad placements of Bai Hui in the nonhuman animal.

Bottom Line: Functionally comparative innervation, in particular, should be similar between species, as the nerves initiate and mediate physiologic changes that result from point stimulation.If researchers choose points that activate different nerves in one species than in another, unpredictable outcomes may occur.Variability in point placement will impede progress and hamper the ability of researchers and clinicians to make meaningful comparisons across species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CSU Center for Comparative and Integrative Pain Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, 300 West Drake Road, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA. Narda.Robinson@colostate.edu.

ABSTRACT
"One Acupuncture", like "One Medicine", has the potential to improve research quality and clinical outcomes. However, while human acupuncture point locations have remained largely consistent over time, the veterinary versions remain imprecise and variable. Establishing anatomical criteria for veterinary acupuncture atlases in keeping with the human template will create congruence across species, benefiting both research and practice. Anatomic criteria for points based on objectively verifiable structures will facilitate translational research. Functionally comparative innervation, in particular, should be similar between species, as the nerves initiate and mediate physiologic changes that result from point stimulation. If researchers choose points that activate different nerves in one species than in another, unpredictable outcomes may occur. Variability in point placement will impede progress and hamper the ability of researchers and clinicians to make meaningful comparisons across species. This paper reveals incongruities that remain between human and veterinary acupuncture points, illustrating the need to analyze anatomical characteristics of each point to assure accuracy in selecting transpositional acupuncture locations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus