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Gold Bead Implantation in Acupoints for Coxofemoral Arthrosis in Dogs: Method Description and Adverse Effects.

Jæger GT, Stigen Ø, Devor M, Moe L - Animals (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: The aims of the present study were to describe the technique of implanting 24-karat gold beads around the hip joints of dogs with chronic hip dysplasia, and to record any side effects or complications of such treatment.Adverse effects, measured as pain or discomfort, were seen for a period of up to four weeks in 15 of the dogs in the gold implantation group, compared to six dogs in the placebo group.Migration of gold beads was only observed in one dog.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Companion Animal Clinical Sciences, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, P.O. Box 8146 Dep., 0033 Oslo, Norway. gry.jaeger@nvh.no.

ABSTRACT
Gold bead implantation has been used for years as an alternative method to improve function in chronic joint disease both in humans and dogs. The aims of the present study were to describe the technique of implanting 24-karat gold beads around the hip joints of dogs with chronic hip dysplasia, and to record any side effects or complications of such treatment. A prospective placebo-controlled double-blinded clinical trial was performed. Eighty dogs were randomly allocated to treatment or placebo, with 38 in the gold implantation group and 42 in the placebo group, and followed intensely for six months. The implantation technique was simple to perform, using fluoroscopy and with the dogs under inhalation anesthesia for about 30 minutes. Adverse effects, measured as pain or discomfort, were seen for a period of up to four weeks in 15 of the dogs in the gold implantation group, compared to six dogs in the placebo group. During implantation, a technical difficulty occurred as 82% of the dogs showed leakage of blood and/or synovia from the needles. The dogs in the gold implantation group were radiographed 18 months later. Of the 30 dogs that were radiographed at both inclusion and 24 months, 80% (24 dogs) showed a deterioration of the coxofemoral arthrosis, the other six had stable disease evaluated by radiography. Migration of gold beads was only observed in one dog.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The acupuncture points GB 29, GB 30 and BL 54 together with two trigger-points marked with Indian ink in the hip area.
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animals-02-00426-f001: The acupuncture points GB 29, GB 30 and BL 54 together with two trigger-points marked with Indian ink in the hip area.

Mentions: An area of approximately 10 cm × 10 cm was clipped over each affected hip joint and aseptically prepared with chlorhexidine soap (Hibiscrub® solution 40 mg/mL) (Figure 1). A veterinarian certified in veterinary acupuncture used an ohmmeter or a “point finder” [10] to find the implantation points. Five points were identified as the acupuncture points GB 29, BL 54 and GB 30 in positions 9, 12 and 3 o’clock with the trochanter major as the center, and two trigger points (painful points) in positions 5 and 7 o’clock. The acupuncture and trigger points were called Points 3, 5, 7, 9 and 12 after their clockwise positions. The area was disinfected with chlorhexidine and ethanol 5mg/ml (Galderma® color ethanol solution).


Gold Bead Implantation in Acupoints for Coxofemoral Arthrosis in Dogs: Method Description and Adverse Effects.

Jæger GT, Stigen Ø, Devor M, Moe L - Animals (Basel) (2012)

The acupuncture points GB 29, GB 30 and BL 54 together with two trigger-points marked with Indian ink in the hip area.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494288&req=5

animals-02-00426-f001: The acupuncture points GB 29, GB 30 and BL 54 together with two trigger-points marked with Indian ink in the hip area.
Mentions: An area of approximately 10 cm × 10 cm was clipped over each affected hip joint and aseptically prepared with chlorhexidine soap (Hibiscrub® solution 40 mg/mL) (Figure 1). A veterinarian certified in veterinary acupuncture used an ohmmeter or a “point finder” [10] to find the implantation points. Five points were identified as the acupuncture points GB 29, BL 54 and GB 30 in positions 9, 12 and 3 o’clock with the trochanter major as the center, and two trigger points (painful points) in positions 5 and 7 o’clock. The acupuncture and trigger points were called Points 3, 5, 7, 9 and 12 after their clockwise positions. The area was disinfected with chlorhexidine and ethanol 5mg/ml (Galderma® color ethanol solution).

Bottom Line: The aims of the present study were to describe the technique of implanting 24-karat gold beads around the hip joints of dogs with chronic hip dysplasia, and to record any side effects or complications of such treatment.Adverse effects, measured as pain or discomfort, were seen for a period of up to four weeks in 15 of the dogs in the gold implantation group, compared to six dogs in the placebo group.Migration of gold beads was only observed in one dog.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Companion Animal Clinical Sciences, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, P.O. Box 8146 Dep., 0033 Oslo, Norway. gry.jaeger@nvh.no.

ABSTRACT
Gold bead implantation has been used for years as an alternative method to improve function in chronic joint disease both in humans and dogs. The aims of the present study were to describe the technique of implanting 24-karat gold beads around the hip joints of dogs with chronic hip dysplasia, and to record any side effects or complications of such treatment. A prospective placebo-controlled double-blinded clinical trial was performed. Eighty dogs were randomly allocated to treatment or placebo, with 38 in the gold implantation group and 42 in the placebo group, and followed intensely for six months. The implantation technique was simple to perform, using fluoroscopy and with the dogs under inhalation anesthesia for about 30 minutes. Adverse effects, measured as pain or discomfort, were seen for a period of up to four weeks in 15 of the dogs in the gold implantation group, compared to six dogs in the placebo group. During implantation, a technical difficulty occurred as 82% of the dogs showed leakage of blood and/or synovia from the needles. The dogs in the gold implantation group were radiographed 18 months later. Of the 30 dogs that were radiographed at both inclusion and 24 months, 80% (24 dogs) showed a deterioration of the coxofemoral arthrosis, the other six had stable disease evaluated by radiography. Migration of gold beads was only observed in one dog.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus