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Hunting Activity Among Naturalistically Housed Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) at the Fundació Mona (Girona, Spain). Predation, Occasional Consumption and Strategies in Rehabilitated Animals.

Llorente M, Riba D, Mosquera M, Ventura M, Feliu O - Animals (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: The evidence of group predation involved the chimpanzees adopting different roles as pursuers and ambushers.Prey was partially eaten in some cases, but not in the social episode.This study confirms that naturalistic environments allow chimpanzees to enhance species-typical behavioral patterns.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Unitat de Recerca i Laboratori d'Etologia, Fundació Mona, Carretera de Cassà km4, Riudellots de la Selva, 17457 Girona, Spain. mllorente@fundacionmona.org.

ABSTRACT
Predatory behavior in wild chimpanzees and other primates has been well documented over the last 30 years. However, as it is an opportunistic behavior, conditions which may promote such behavior are left up to chance. Until now, predatory behavior among captive chimpanzees has been poorly documented. In this paper, we present five instances providing evidence of predatory behavior: four performed by isolated individuals and one carried out in cooperation. The evidence of group predation involved the chimpanzees adopting different roles as pursuers and ambushers. Prey was partially eaten in some cases, but not in the social episode. This study confirms that naturalistic environments allow chimpanzees to enhance species-typical behavioral patterns.

No MeSH data available.


Predation of an Oryctolagus cuniculus (Episode H5) by Family Group. Transport and consumption of the prey.
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animals-02-00363-f007: Predation of an Oryctolagus cuniculus (Episode H5) by Family Group. Transport and consumption of the prey.

Mentions: An episode was registered on 17 September 2011 between 12:20 and 12:30. Juanito (Group B, male adolescent) was the subject most implicated in the episode but we neither detected his predation strategy, the exact moment of predation, nor exactly how he hunted. Two other individuals (Nico, male adolescent) and (Africa, female adolescent) played secondary roles in the episode. At 12:22, we started to photographically record the hunting episode. At 12:23, the prey was placed on the ground and Juanito took hold of a wooden stick to use it as a spear and began to repeatedly stab the rabbit with it (Figure 6). At 12:24 Nico rejoined Juanito. At that moment, Juanito approached the perimeter of the enclosure and threw the rabbit against the electrified fence. At 12:26 he returned transporting the prey in his mouth (Figure 7(a)). The abdomen of the rabbit was totally open with the intestines missing. One of the lower limbs was missing its muscular mass (possibly due to ingestion) and it was possible to see exposed bone. At 12:30 Juanito returned holding the prey and brought it up to his mouth, tasting it but without totally ingesting it (Figure 7(b)). Finally, the prey was discarded on the ground.


Hunting Activity Among Naturalistically Housed Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) at the Fundació Mona (Girona, Spain). Predation, Occasional Consumption and Strategies in Rehabilitated Animals.

Llorente M, Riba D, Mosquera M, Ventura M, Feliu O - Animals (Basel) (2012)

Predation of an Oryctolagus cuniculus (Episode H5) by Family Group. Transport and consumption of the prey.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494286&req=5

animals-02-00363-f007: Predation of an Oryctolagus cuniculus (Episode H5) by Family Group. Transport and consumption of the prey.
Mentions: An episode was registered on 17 September 2011 between 12:20 and 12:30. Juanito (Group B, male adolescent) was the subject most implicated in the episode but we neither detected his predation strategy, the exact moment of predation, nor exactly how he hunted. Two other individuals (Nico, male adolescent) and (Africa, female adolescent) played secondary roles in the episode. At 12:22, we started to photographically record the hunting episode. At 12:23, the prey was placed on the ground and Juanito took hold of a wooden stick to use it as a spear and began to repeatedly stab the rabbit with it (Figure 6). At 12:24 Nico rejoined Juanito. At that moment, Juanito approached the perimeter of the enclosure and threw the rabbit against the electrified fence. At 12:26 he returned transporting the prey in his mouth (Figure 7(a)). The abdomen of the rabbit was totally open with the intestines missing. One of the lower limbs was missing its muscular mass (possibly due to ingestion) and it was possible to see exposed bone. At 12:30 Juanito returned holding the prey and brought it up to his mouth, tasting it but without totally ingesting it (Figure 7(b)). Finally, the prey was discarded on the ground.

Bottom Line: The evidence of group predation involved the chimpanzees adopting different roles as pursuers and ambushers.Prey was partially eaten in some cases, but not in the social episode.This study confirms that naturalistic environments allow chimpanzees to enhance species-typical behavioral patterns.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Unitat de Recerca i Laboratori d'Etologia, Fundació Mona, Carretera de Cassà km4, Riudellots de la Selva, 17457 Girona, Spain. mllorente@fundacionmona.org.

ABSTRACT
Predatory behavior in wild chimpanzees and other primates has been well documented over the last 30 years. However, as it is an opportunistic behavior, conditions which may promote such behavior are left up to chance. Until now, predatory behavior among captive chimpanzees has been poorly documented. In this paper, we present five instances providing evidence of predatory behavior: four performed by isolated individuals and one carried out in cooperation. The evidence of group predation involved the chimpanzees adopting different roles as pursuers and ambushers. Prey was partially eaten in some cases, but not in the social episode. This study confirms that naturalistic environments allow chimpanzees to enhance species-typical behavioral patterns.

No MeSH data available.