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Pet Ownership and Evacuation Prior to Hurricane Irene.

Hunt MG, Bogue K, Rohrbaugh N - Animals (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: Hurricane Irene hit the East Coast of the United States in 2011, providing an excellent opportunity to examine the impact of the PETS legislation on frequency and ease of evacuation among pet owners and non-pet owners.Pet ownership was not found to be a statistical risk factor for evacuation failure.However, many pet owners who failed to evacuate continue to cite pet related reasons.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, 3720 Walnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. mhunt@psych.upenn.edu.

ABSTRACT
Pet ownership has historically been one of the biggest risk factors for evacuation failure prior to natural disasters. The forced abandonment of pets during Hurricane Katrina in 2005 made national headlines and led to the passage of the Pet Evacuation and Transportation Standards Act (PETS, 2006) which mandated local authorities to plan for companion animal evacuation. Hurricane Irene hit the East Coast of the United States in 2011, providing an excellent opportunity to examine the impact of the PETS legislation on frequency and ease of evacuation among pet owners and non-pet owners. Ninety pet owners and 27 non-pet owners who lived in mandatory evacuation zones completed questionnaires assessing their experiences during the hurricane and symptoms of depression, PTSD, dissociative experiences, and acute stress. Pet ownership was not found to be a statistical risk factor for evacuation failure. However, many pet owners who failed to evacuate continue to cite pet related reasons.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Reasons for Evacuation Failure by Pet Owners.
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animals-02-00529-f002: Reasons for Evacuation Failure by Pet Owners.

Mentions: While owning a pet was not a statistically significant risk factor for evacuation failure in our sample, twenty pet owners (51%) who failed to evacuate endorsed pet-related factors as influencing their evacuation decisions to a great degree. These factors included things like inability to transport pet, cost of transporting or sheltering pet, and lack of a place for the pet to stay. Twenty-six pet owners who did not evacuate said that wanting to watch their property was the single most important factor in their decision to not evacuate. Twenty-three pet owners said they felt the hurricane was nonthreatening. Other primary reasons for not evacuating among pet owners included lack of shelter for people (8 people), cost of evacuating (6 people), physical disability (2 people), and lack of transportation (1 person). See Figure 2.


Pet Ownership and Evacuation Prior to Hurricane Irene.

Hunt MG, Bogue K, Rohrbaugh N - Animals (Basel) (2012)

Reasons for Evacuation Failure by Pet Owners.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494278&req=5

animals-02-00529-f002: Reasons for Evacuation Failure by Pet Owners.
Mentions: While owning a pet was not a statistically significant risk factor for evacuation failure in our sample, twenty pet owners (51%) who failed to evacuate endorsed pet-related factors as influencing their evacuation decisions to a great degree. These factors included things like inability to transport pet, cost of transporting or sheltering pet, and lack of a place for the pet to stay. Twenty-six pet owners who did not evacuate said that wanting to watch their property was the single most important factor in their decision to not evacuate. Twenty-three pet owners said they felt the hurricane was nonthreatening. Other primary reasons for not evacuating among pet owners included lack of shelter for people (8 people), cost of evacuating (6 people), physical disability (2 people), and lack of transportation (1 person). See Figure 2.

Bottom Line: Hurricane Irene hit the East Coast of the United States in 2011, providing an excellent opportunity to examine the impact of the PETS legislation on frequency and ease of evacuation among pet owners and non-pet owners.Pet ownership was not found to be a statistical risk factor for evacuation failure.However, many pet owners who failed to evacuate continue to cite pet related reasons.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, 3720 Walnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. mhunt@psych.upenn.edu.

ABSTRACT
Pet ownership has historically been one of the biggest risk factors for evacuation failure prior to natural disasters. The forced abandonment of pets during Hurricane Katrina in 2005 made national headlines and led to the passage of the Pet Evacuation and Transportation Standards Act (PETS, 2006) which mandated local authorities to plan for companion animal evacuation. Hurricane Irene hit the East Coast of the United States in 2011, providing an excellent opportunity to examine the impact of the PETS legislation on frequency and ease of evacuation among pet owners and non-pet owners. Ninety pet owners and 27 non-pet owners who lived in mandatory evacuation zones completed questionnaires assessing their experiences during the hurricane and symptoms of depression, PTSD, dissociative experiences, and acute stress. Pet ownership was not found to be a statistical risk factor for evacuation failure. However, many pet owners who failed to evacuate continue to cite pet related reasons.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus