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Identifying the Conditions Under Which Antibodies Protect Against Infection by Equine Infectious Anemia Virus.

Schwartz EJ, Smith RJ - Vaccines (Basel) (2014)

Bottom Line: A more complete understanding is needed of antibody protection against lentivirus infection, as well as the role of mutation in resistance to an antibody vaccine.In addition, a three-strain competition model is considered in which a second mutant strain may coexist with the first mutant strain.The conditions that permit viral escape by the mutant strains are determined, as are the effects of variation in the model parameters.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences and Department of Mathematics, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, USA. ejs@wsu.edu.

ABSTRACT
The ability to predict the conditions under which antibodies protect against viral infection would transform our approach to vaccine development. A more complete understanding is needed of antibody protection against lentivirus infection, as well as the role of mutation in resistance to an antibody vaccine. Recently, an example of antibody-mediated vaccine protection has been shown via passive transfer of neutralizing antibodies before equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infection of horses with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). Viral dynamic modeling of antibody protection from EIAV infection in SCID horses may lead to insights into the mechanisms of control of infection by antibody vaccination. In this work, such a model is constructed in conjunction with data from EIAV infection of SCID horses to gain insights into multiple strain competition in the presence of antibody control. Conditions are determined under which wild-type infection is eradicated with the antibody vaccine. In addition, a three-strain competition model is considered in which a second mutant strain may coexist with the first mutant strain. The conditions that permit viral escape by the mutant strains are determined, as are the effects of variation in the model parameters. This work extends the current understanding of competition and antibody control in lentiviral infection, which may provide insights into the development of vaccines that stimulate the immune system to control infection effectively.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The antibody count for the case when both mutants have 100-fold resistance and m = 10. Antibody boosts occur on Day 7 and Day 14. This figure looks similar for other values of m.
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vaccines-02-00397-f002: The antibody count for the case when both mutants have 100-fold resistance and m = 10. Antibody boosts occur on Day 7 and Day 14. This figure looks similar for other values of m.

Mentions: Figure 2 illustrates the effect of the two antibody boosts (on Days 7 and 14) for the case when both mutants have 100-fold resistance and m = 10; see Table 2. An antibody boost on Day 7 has an instantaneous effect of increasing the antibody count. A final boost on Day 14 increases the antibody count again. After this time, the antibodies decay to zero after approximately 40 days.


Identifying the Conditions Under Which Antibodies Protect Against Infection by Equine Infectious Anemia Virus.

Schwartz EJ, Smith RJ - Vaccines (Basel) (2014)

The antibody count for the case when both mutants have 100-fold resistance and m = 10. Antibody boosts occur on Day 7 and Day 14. This figure looks similar for other values of m.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494265&req=5

vaccines-02-00397-f002: The antibody count for the case when both mutants have 100-fold resistance and m = 10. Antibody boosts occur on Day 7 and Day 14. This figure looks similar for other values of m.
Mentions: Figure 2 illustrates the effect of the two antibody boosts (on Days 7 and 14) for the case when both mutants have 100-fold resistance and m = 10; see Table 2. An antibody boost on Day 7 has an instantaneous effect of increasing the antibody count. A final boost on Day 14 increases the antibody count again. After this time, the antibodies decay to zero after approximately 40 days.

Bottom Line: A more complete understanding is needed of antibody protection against lentivirus infection, as well as the role of mutation in resistance to an antibody vaccine.In addition, a three-strain competition model is considered in which a second mutant strain may coexist with the first mutant strain.The conditions that permit viral escape by the mutant strains are determined, as are the effects of variation in the model parameters.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences and Department of Mathematics, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, USA. ejs@wsu.edu.

ABSTRACT
The ability to predict the conditions under which antibodies protect against viral infection would transform our approach to vaccine development. A more complete understanding is needed of antibody protection against lentivirus infection, as well as the role of mutation in resistance to an antibody vaccine. Recently, an example of antibody-mediated vaccine protection has been shown via passive transfer of neutralizing antibodies before equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infection of horses with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). Viral dynamic modeling of antibody protection from EIAV infection in SCID horses may lead to insights into the mechanisms of control of infection by antibody vaccination. In this work, such a model is constructed in conjunction with data from EIAV infection of SCID horses to gain insights into multiple strain competition in the presence of antibody control. Conditions are determined under which wild-type infection is eradicated with the antibody vaccine. In addition, a three-strain competition model is considered in which a second mutant strain may coexist with the first mutant strain. The conditions that permit viral escape by the mutant strains are determined, as are the effects of variation in the model parameters. This work extends the current understanding of competition and antibody control in lentiviral infection, which may provide insights into the development of vaccines that stimulate the immune system to control infection effectively.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus