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Importance of cycles of chemotherapy and postdocetaxel novel therapies in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

Poon DM, Ng J, Chan K - Prostate Int (2015)

Bottom Line: The median follow-up time was 14.3 months.The median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival were 20.8 months and 5.8 months, respectively.Patients who had received abiraterone and cabazitaxel as postdocetaxel treatment had significantly longer OS compared with those who received other postdocetaxel treatments (including rechallenge of docetaxel) and those who did not receive any postdocetaxel treatment (35.3 months vs. 20.8 months vs. 15.3 months, P = 0.00057).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Oncology, State Key Laboratory in Oncology in South China, Sir Y.K. Pao Centre for Cancer, Hong Kong Cancer Institute, Hong Kong ; Prince of Wales Hospital, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: With the emergence of various novel therapies including new generation taxane and androgen-targeted therapies, the optimal sequence of systemic treatment in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients remains to be defined. Our aim is to investigate the impact of duration of docetaxel-based chemotherapy and postdocetaxel treatment in mCRPC patients.

Methods: The medical data of 57 Chinese mCRPC patients who received docetaxel-based chemotherapy in two oncology centers between 2003 and 2012 were reviewed. The treatment efficacy and toxicity were determined. The potential determinants of efficacy were also determined.

Results: Fifty-seven patients (median age 66 years, range 51-82 years) were given docetaxel-based chemotherapy, of whom 48 (84.2%) received 3-weekly docetaxel (52.5-75 mg/m(2)) and nine (15.8%) received weekly docetaxel (35 mg/m(2)). Postdocetaxel treatments were received by 31 (57.4%) patients, including abiraterone in 13 patients and cabazitaxel in one patient. The median follow-up time was 14.3 months. The median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival were 20.8 months and 5.8 months, respectively. In multivariate analysis, eight cycles or more of chemotherapy [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.151, P < 0.0358], use of postdocetaxel treatment (HR = 0.346, P = 0.0005), and hemoglobin level of <10 (HR = 5.224, P < 0.0001) were independent determinants of OS. Patients who had received abiraterone and cabazitaxel as postdocetaxel treatment had significantly longer OS compared with those who received other postdocetaxel treatments (including rechallenge of docetaxel) and those who did not receive any postdocetaxel treatment (35.3 months vs. 20.8 months vs. 15.3 months, P = 0.00057).

Conclusions: The results suggest that maximizing exposure to docetaxel-based chemotherapy followed by novel therapies would have a favorable survival impact on mCRPC patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Progression-free survival and overall survival.
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fig1: Progression-free survival and overall survival.

Mentions: Disease progression occurred in 54 patients (94.7%), seven during chemotherapy and 47 after discontinuation of chemotherapy. Postdocetaxel therapies were administered to 31 patients (57.4%), including abiraterone in 13 patients and cabazitaxel in one patient (Table 3). The median OS and progression-free survival time of the cohort were 20.8 months and 5.8 months, respectively (Fig. 1). The 1-year OS rate was 77.8%. As a whole group, nonresponders had significantly shorter OS than responders (16.2 months vs. 27.2 months, P = 0.028).


Importance of cycles of chemotherapy and postdocetaxel novel therapies in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

Poon DM, Ng J, Chan K - Prostate Int (2015)

Progression-free survival and overall survival.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494213&req=5

fig1: Progression-free survival and overall survival.
Mentions: Disease progression occurred in 54 patients (94.7%), seven during chemotherapy and 47 after discontinuation of chemotherapy. Postdocetaxel therapies were administered to 31 patients (57.4%), including abiraterone in 13 patients and cabazitaxel in one patient (Table 3). The median OS and progression-free survival time of the cohort were 20.8 months and 5.8 months, respectively (Fig. 1). The 1-year OS rate was 77.8%. As a whole group, nonresponders had significantly shorter OS than responders (16.2 months vs. 27.2 months, P = 0.028).

Bottom Line: The median follow-up time was 14.3 months.The median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival were 20.8 months and 5.8 months, respectively.Patients who had received abiraterone and cabazitaxel as postdocetaxel treatment had significantly longer OS compared with those who received other postdocetaxel treatments (including rechallenge of docetaxel) and those who did not receive any postdocetaxel treatment (35.3 months vs. 20.8 months vs. 15.3 months, P = 0.00057).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Oncology, State Key Laboratory in Oncology in South China, Sir Y.K. Pao Centre for Cancer, Hong Kong Cancer Institute, Hong Kong ; Prince of Wales Hospital, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: With the emergence of various novel therapies including new generation taxane and androgen-targeted therapies, the optimal sequence of systemic treatment in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients remains to be defined. Our aim is to investigate the impact of duration of docetaxel-based chemotherapy and postdocetaxel treatment in mCRPC patients.

Methods: The medical data of 57 Chinese mCRPC patients who received docetaxel-based chemotherapy in two oncology centers between 2003 and 2012 were reviewed. The treatment efficacy and toxicity were determined. The potential determinants of efficacy were also determined.

Results: Fifty-seven patients (median age 66 years, range 51-82 years) were given docetaxel-based chemotherapy, of whom 48 (84.2%) received 3-weekly docetaxel (52.5-75 mg/m(2)) and nine (15.8%) received weekly docetaxel (35 mg/m(2)). Postdocetaxel treatments were received by 31 (57.4%) patients, including abiraterone in 13 patients and cabazitaxel in one patient. The median follow-up time was 14.3 months. The median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival were 20.8 months and 5.8 months, respectively. In multivariate analysis, eight cycles or more of chemotherapy [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.151, P < 0.0358], use of postdocetaxel treatment (HR = 0.346, P = 0.0005), and hemoglobin level of <10 (HR = 5.224, P < 0.0001) were independent determinants of OS. Patients who had received abiraterone and cabazitaxel as postdocetaxel treatment had significantly longer OS compared with those who received other postdocetaxel treatments (including rechallenge of docetaxel) and those who did not receive any postdocetaxel treatment (35.3 months vs. 20.8 months vs. 15.3 months, P = 0.00057).

Conclusions: The results suggest that maximizing exposure to docetaxel-based chemotherapy followed by novel therapies would have a favorable survival impact on mCRPC patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus