Limits...
Relations of Wolbachia Infection with Phylogeography of Philaenus spumarius (Hemiptera: Aphrophoridae) Populations Within and Beyond the Carpathian Contact Zone.

Lis A, Maryańska-Nadachowska A, Kajtoch Ł - Microb. Ecol. (2015)

Bottom Line: Given the reproductive alterations which are often associated with this endosymbiont, Wolbachia probably maintain genetic differentiation of its hosts in its contact zone in the Carpathians.This is one of the first studies demonstrating the presence of Wolbachia across a large part of the range of insect species, including the contact zone.The spread of Wolbachia in P. spumarius populations can potentially cause speciation by compromising the potential reproductive barrier between infected and uninfected populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Systematics and Evolution of Animals, Polish Academy of Sciences, Slawkowska St. 17, 31-016, Cracow, Poland, lis@isez.pan.krakow.pl.

ABSTRACT
Wolbachia is the most widespread intracellular α-proteobacteria maternally inherited endosymbiont of insects and nematodes. These bacteria are associated with a number of different reproductive phenotypes of their hosts. Relatively few studies have dealt with distribution of infections across populations and with the influence of these bacteria on host genetic diversification and speciation. The aims of this study are to determine the distribution and rate of infection and to characterize the Wolbachia strains associated with Philaenus spumarius spittlebug (Hemiptera) by using multilocus sequencing typing (MLST) analysis and host phylogeography. The results showed that infection rate was significantly different between members of both main mitochondrial phylogenetic lineages of P. spumarius. We detected much higher infection rates of Wolbachia in P. spumarius populations from the north-east clade than the south-west clade. Moreover, the frequency of these infections varied within and outside the contact zone known from the Carpathians. Given the reproductive alterations which are often associated with this endosymbiont, Wolbachia probably maintain genetic differentiation of its hosts in its contact zone in the Carpathians. This is one of the first studies demonstrating the presence of Wolbachia across a large part of the range of insect species, including the contact zone. The spread of Wolbachia in P. spumarius populations can potentially cause speciation by compromising the potential reproductive barrier between infected and uninfected populations. We discuss possible implications of Wolbachia infection inducing cytoplasmic incompatibility in the population dynamics of this spittlebug but confirm that more studies are also required.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Neighbor-joining phylogenic tree of Wolbachia strains in P. spumarius obtained with the use of MEGA5 for joined MLST genes
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494152&req=5

Fig2: Neighbor-joining phylogenic tree of Wolbachia strains in P. spumarius obtained with the use of MEGA5 for joined MLST genes

Mentions: The phylogenetic analysis results of the Wolbachia MLST sequences from P. spumarius and P. italosignus are shown in Fig. 2. The neighbor-joining analysis revealed two major branches in the phylogenetic trees based on Wolbachia MLST sequences separately for each gene (Fig. S1a-e) and collectively for all MLST genes (Fig. 2). These two characteristic branches clustered Wolbachia sequences from the P. spumarius populations into two main supergroups (Fig. 2). At the first branches are nearly 95 % of populations which harbored strains belonging to the B supergroup. The second branch included Wolbachia-infected populations from the southern Carpathians, which suggested that approximately 5 % were infected from an alternative source by strains belonging to supergroup A. Additionally, the possible relationships between the Wolbachia haplotypes were estimated using the median-joining networks shown in Figs. 3 and S2a-e, which show congruent patterns with neighbor-joining trees. Additionally this network brought more information than traditional phylogenetic tree as it showed also multiple connections among examined Wolbachia haplotypes (MLST strains) which could correspond to, e.g., recombination events.Fig. 2


Relations of Wolbachia Infection with Phylogeography of Philaenus spumarius (Hemiptera: Aphrophoridae) Populations Within and Beyond the Carpathian Contact Zone.

Lis A, Maryańska-Nadachowska A, Kajtoch Ł - Microb. Ecol. (2015)

Neighbor-joining phylogenic tree of Wolbachia strains in P. spumarius obtained with the use of MEGA5 for joined MLST genes
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494152&req=5

Fig2: Neighbor-joining phylogenic tree of Wolbachia strains in P. spumarius obtained with the use of MEGA5 for joined MLST genes
Mentions: The phylogenetic analysis results of the Wolbachia MLST sequences from P. spumarius and P. italosignus are shown in Fig. 2. The neighbor-joining analysis revealed two major branches in the phylogenetic trees based on Wolbachia MLST sequences separately for each gene (Fig. S1a-e) and collectively for all MLST genes (Fig. 2). These two characteristic branches clustered Wolbachia sequences from the P. spumarius populations into two main supergroups (Fig. 2). At the first branches are nearly 95 % of populations which harbored strains belonging to the B supergroup. The second branch included Wolbachia-infected populations from the southern Carpathians, which suggested that approximately 5 % were infected from an alternative source by strains belonging to supergroup A. Additionally, the possible relationships between the Wolbachia haplotypes were estimated using the median-joining networks shown in Figs. 3 and S2a-e, which show congruent patterns with neighbor-joining trees. Additionally this network brought more information than traditional phylogenetic tree as it showed also multiple connections among examined Wolbachia haplotypes (MLST strains) which could correspond to, e.g., recombination events.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Given the reproductive alterations which are often associated with this endosymbiont, Wolbachia probably maintain genetic differentiation of its hosts in its contact zone in the Carpathians.This is one of the first studies demonstrating the presence of Wolbachia across a large part of the range of insect species, including the contact zone.The spread of Wolbachia in P. spumarius populations can potentially cause speciation by compromising the potential reproductive barrier between infected and uninfected populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Systematics and Evolution of Animals, Polish Academy of Sciences, Slawkowska St. 17, 31-016, Cracow, Poland, lis@isez.pan.krakow.pl.

ABSTRACT
Wolbachia is the most widespread intracellular α-proteobacteria maternally inherited endosymbiont of insects and nematodes. These bacteria are associated with a number of different reproductive phenotypes of their hosts. Relatively few studies have dealt with distribution of infections across populations and with the influence of these bacteria on host genetic diversification and speciation. The aims of this study are to determine the distribution and rate of infection and to characterize the Wolbachia strains associated with Philaenus spumarius spittlebug (Hemiptera) by using multilocus sequencing typing (MLST) analysis and host phylogeography. The results showed that infection rate was significantly different between members of both main mitochondrial phylogenetic lineages of P. spumarius. We detected much higher infection rates of Wolbachia in P. spumarius populations from the north-east clade than the south-west clade. Moreover, the frequency of these infections varied within and outside the contact zone known from the Carpathians. Given the reproductive alterations which are often associated with this endosymbiont, Wolbachia probably maintain genetic differentiation of its hosts in its contact zone in the Carpathians. This is one of the first studies demonstrating the presence of Wolbachia across a large part of the range of insect species, including the contact zone. The spread of Wolbachia in P. spumarius populations can potentially cause speciation by compromising the potential reproductive barrier between infected and uninfected populations. We discuss possible implications of Wolbachia infection inducing cytoplasmic incompatibility in the population dynamics of this spittlebug but confirm that more studies are also required.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus