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Relations of Wolbachia Infection with Phylogeography of Philaenus spumarius (Hemiptera: Aphrophoridae) Populations Within and Beyond the Carpathian Contact Zone.

Lis A, Maryańska-Nadachowska A, Kajtoch Ł - Microb. Ecol. (2015)

Bottom Line: Given the reproductive alterations which are often associated with this endosymbiont, Wolbachia probably maintain genetic differentiation of its hosts in its contact zone in the Carpathians.This is one of the first studies demonstrating the presence of Wolbachia across a large part of the range of insect species, including the contact zone.The spread of Wolbachia in P. spumarius populations can potentially cause speciation by compromising the potential reproductive barrier between infected and uninfected populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Systematics and Evolution of Animals, Polish Academy of Sciences, Slawkowska St. 17, 31-016, Cracow, Poland, lis@isez.pan.krakow.pl.

ABSTRACT
Wolbachia is the most widespread intracellular α-proteobacteria maternally inherited endosymbiont of insects and nematodes. These bacteria are associated with a number of different reproductive phenotypes of their hosts. Relatively few studies have dealt with distribution of infections across populations and with the influence of these bacteria on host genetic diversification and speciation. The aims of this study are to determine the distribution and rate of infection and to characterize the Wolbachia strains associated with Philaenus spumarius spittlebug (Hemiptera) by using multilocus sequencing typing (MLST) analysis and host phylogeography. The results showed that infection rate was significantly different between members of both main mitochondrial phylogenetic lineages of P. spumarius. We detected much higher infection rates of Wolbachia in P. spumarius populations from the north-east clade than the south-west clade. Moreover, the frequency of these infections varied within and outside the contact zone known from the Carpathians. Given the reproductive alterations which are often associated with this endosymbiont, Wolbachia probably maintain genetic differentiation of its hosts in its contact zone in the Carpathians. This is one of the first studies demonstrating the presence of Wolbachia across a large part of the range of insect species, including the contact zone. The spread of Wolbachia in P. spumarius populations can potentially cause speciation by compromising the potential reproductive barrier between infected and uninfected populations. We discuss possible implications of Wolbachia infection inducing cytoplasmic incompatibility in the population dynamics of this spittlebug but confirm that more studies are also required.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Localization of P. spumarius sampling sites and distribution of Wolbachia infections (including Carpathian Mountains (CM)). Circles represent populations harboring haplotypes belonging to SW mitochondrial clade; triangles represent populations with NE mitochondrial haplotypes; and squares represent populations including haplotypes from both clades. Empty marks indicate lack of evidence for Wolbachia infection; grey marks represent populations in which infection was detected (strains belonging to B supergroup). Populations infected with local strain of A supergroup are marked additionally with a plus mark
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Fig1: Localization of P. spumarius sampling sites and distribution of Wolbachia infections (including Carpathian Mountains (CM)). Circles represent populations harboring haplotypes belonging to SW mitochondrial clade; triangles represent populations with NE mitochondrial haplotypes; and squares represent populations including haplotypes from both clades. Empty marks indicate lack of evidence for Wolbachia infection; grey marks represent populations in which infection was detected (strains belonging to B supergroup). Populations infected with local strain of A supergroup are marked additionally with a plus mark

Mentions: Individuals from 49 populations of P. spumarius were collected from 2003 to 2011 (Fig. 1). Thirty-one populations (102 individuals) covering nearly the entire range of P. spumarius (locality symbols S) and eighteen populations (72 individuals) from six transects across the Carpathian arc (locality symbol CM) were sampled (Table 1). Additionally, six specimens of Philaenus tesselatus (from Portugal) and single representatives of Philaenus italosignus (from Sicily), Philaenus signatus (from Greece), Philaenus arslani (from Lebanon), Philaenus loukasi (from Greece), Philaenus tarifa, and Philaenus maghresignus (from Southern Spain) were tested for Wolbachia presence (we missed the newly described species Philaenus elbursianus and Philaenus iranicus due to the unavailability of these Iranian taxa [80]). Samples of these species, as well as the majority of individuals of P. spumarius, were previously used in phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies [54, 55], whereas Carpathian samples were used for examination of the contact zone [48]. The spittlebugs were caught in a sweep-net, instantaneously preserved in 99 % ethanol, and stored at −20 °C. All tested specimens were damaged during extraction of DNA procedure. The remaining voucher specimens are preserved at the Institute of Systematics and Evolution of Animals, Polish Academy of Sciences.Fig. 1


Relations of Wolbachia Infection with Phylogeography of Philaenus spumarius (Hemiptera: Aphrophoridae) Populations Within and Beyond the Carpathian Contact Zone.

Lis A, Maryańska-Nadachowska A, Kajtoch Ł - Microb. Ecol. (2015)

Localization of P. spumarius sampling sites and distribution of Wolbachia infections (including Carpathian Mountains (CM)). Circles represent populations harboring haplotypes belonging to SW mitochondrial clade; triangles represent populations with NE mitochondrial haplotypes; and squares represent populations including haplotypes from both clades. Empty marks indicate lack of evidence for Wolbachia infection; grey marks represent populations in which infection was detected (strains belonging to B supergroup). Populations infected with local strain of A supergroup are marked additionally with a plus mark
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494152&req=5

Fig1: Localization of P. spumarius sampling sites and distribution of Wolbachia infections (including Carpathian Mountains (CM)). Circles represent populations harboring haplotypes belonging to SW mitochondrial clade; triangles represent populations with NE mitochondrial haplotypes; and squares represent populations including haplotypes from both clades. Empty marks indicate lack of evidence for Wolbachia infection; grey marks represent populations in which infection was detected (strains belonging to B supergroup). Populations infected with local strain of A supergroup are marked additionally with a plus mark
Mentions: Individuals from 49 populations of P. spumarius were collected from 2003 to 2011 (Fig. 1). Thirty-one populations (102 individuals) covering nearly the entire range of P. spumarius (locality symbols S) and eighteen populations (72 individuals) from six transects across the Carpathian arc (locality symbol CM) were sampled (Table 1). Additionally, six specimens of Philaenus tesselatus (from Portugal) and single representatives of Philaenus italosignus (from Sicily), Philaenus signatus (from Greece), Philaenus arslani (from Lebanon), Philaenus loukasi (from Greece), Philaenus tarifa, and Philaenus maghresignus (from Southern Spain) were tested for Wolbachia presence (we missed the newly described species Philaenus elbursianus and Philaenus iranicus due to the unavailability of these Iranian taxa [80]). Samples of these species, as well as the majority of individuals of P. spumarius, were previously used in phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies [54, 55], whereas Carpathian samples were used for examination of the contact zone [48]. The spittlebugs were caught in a sweep-net, instantaneously preserved in 99 % ethanol, and stored at −20 °C. All tested specimens were damaged during extraction of DNA procedure. The remaining voucher specimens are preserved at the Institute of Systematics and Evolution of Animals, Polish Academy of Sciences.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Given the reproductive alterations which are often associated with this endosymbiont, Wolbachia probably maintain genetic differentiation of its hosts in its contact zone in the Carpathians.This is one of the first studies demonstrating the presence of Wolbachia across a large part of the range of insect species, including the contact zone.The spread of Wolbachia in P. spumarius populations can potentially cause speciation by compromising the potential reproductive barrier between infected and uninfected populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Systematics and Evolution of Animals, Polish Academy of Sciences, Slawkowska St. 17, 31-016, Cracow, Poland, lis@isez.pan.krakow.pl.

ABSTRACT
Wolbachia is the most widespread intracellular α-proteobacteria maternally inherited endosymbiont of insects and nematodes. These bacteria are associated with a number of different reproductive phenotypes of their hosts. Relatively few studies have dealt with distribution of infections across populations and with the influence of these bacteria on host genetic diversification and speciation. The aims of this study are to determine the distribution and rate of infection and to characterize the Wolbachia strains associated with Philaenus spumarius spittlebug (Hemiptera) by using multilocus sequencing typing (MLST) analysis and host phylogeography. The results showed that infection rate was significantly different between members of both main mitochondrial phylogenetic lineages of P. spumarius. We detected much higher infection rates of Wolbachia in P. spumarius populations from the north-east clade than the south-west clade. Moreover, the frequency of these infections varied within and outside the contact zone known from the Carpathians. Given the reproductive alterations which are often associated with this endosymbiont, Wolbachia probably maintain genetic differentiation of its hosts in its contact zone in the Carpathians. This is one of the first studies demonstrating the presence of Wolbachia across a large part of the range of insect species, including the contact zone. The spread of Wolbachia in P. spumarius populations can potentially cause speciation by compromising the potential reproductive barrier between infected and uninfected populations. We discuss possible implications of Wolbachia infection inducing cytoplasmic incompatibility in the population dynamics of this spittlebug but confirm that more studies are also required.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus