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Toward angiogenesis of implanted bio-artificial liver using scaffolds with type I collagen and adipose tissue-derived stem cells.

Lee JG, Bak SY, Nahm JH, Lee SW, Min SO, Kim KS - Korean J Hepatobiliary Pancreat Surg (2015)

Bottom Line: Grossly, the artificial scaffolds showed adhesion to the stomach and surrounding organs; however, there was no evidence of angiogenesis within the scaffolds; and VEGF, CD34, and CD105 expressions were not detected after 30 days.Although implantation of cells into artificial scaffolds did not facilitate angiogenesis, the artificial scaffolds made with type I collagen helped maintain implanted cells, and surrounding tissue reactions were rare.Our findings indicate that type I collagen artificial scaffolds can be considered as a possible implantable biomaterial.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Backgrounds/aims: Stem cell therapies for liver disease are being studied by many researchers worldwide, but scientific evidence to demonstrate the endocrinologic effects of implanted cells is insufficient, and it is unknown whether implanted cells can function as liver cells. Achieving angiogenesis, arguably the most important characteristic of the liver, is known to be quite difficult, and no practical attempts have been made to achieve this outcome. We carried out this study to observe the possibility of angiogenesis of implanted bio-artificial liver using scaffolds.

Methods: This study used adipose tissue-derived stem cells that were collected from adult patients with liver diseases with conditions similar to the liver parenchyma. Specifically, microfilaments were used to create an artificial membrane and maintain the structure of an artificial organ. After scratching the stomach surface of severe combined immunocompromised (SCID) mice (n=4), artificial scaffolds with adipose tissue-derived stem cells and type I collagen were implanted. Expression levels of angiogenesis markers including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), CD34, and CD105 were immunohistochemically assessed after 30 days.

Results: Grossly, the artificial scaffolds showed adhesion to the stomach and surrounding organs; however, there was no evidence of angiogenesis within the scaffolds; and VEGF, CD34, and CD105 expressions were not detected after 30 days.

Conclusions: Although implantation of cells into artificial scaffolds did not facilitate angiogenesis, the artificial scaffolds made with type I collagen helped maintain implanted cells, and surrounding tissue reactions were rare. Our findings indicate that type I collagen artificial scaffolds can be considered as a possible implantable biomaterial.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

H&E-stained images of the artificial scaffold material processed 30 days after implantation into SCID mice. Red eosin stain showed the artificial collagen scaffold. Black arrows indicate where the scaffold was sutured to the mouse stomach.
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Figure 4: H&E-stained images of the artificial scaffold material processed 30 days after implantation into SCID mice. Red eosin stain showed the artificial collagen scaffold. Black arrows indicate where the scaffold was sutured to the mouse stomach.

Mentions: We observed the H&E-stained artificial scaffolds under low magnification to assess their overall appearance. Fig. 4 shows collagen surrounding the scaffold that contained adipose tissue-derived stem cells. The collagen membrane was disrupted where the scaffold was sutured to fix it to the pylorus and fundus, and this membrane linked the artificial scaffold and the stomach.


Toward angiogenesis of implanted bio-artificial liver using scaffolds with type I collagen and adipose tissue-derived stem cells.

Lee JG, Bak SY, Nahm JH, Lee SW, Min SO, Kim KS - Korean J Hepatobiliary Pancreat Surg (2015)

H&E-stained images of the artificial scaffold material processed 30 days after implantation into SCID mice. Red eosin stain showed the artificial collagen scaffold. Black arrows indicate where the scaffold was sutured to the mouse stomach.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494077&req=5

Figure 4: H&E-stained images of the artificial scaffold material processed 30 days after implantation into SCID mice. Red eosin stain showed the artificial collagen scaffold. Black arrows indicate where the scaffold was sutured to the mouse stomach.
Mentions: We observed the H&E-stained artificial scaffolds under low magnification to assess their overall appearance. Fig. 4 shows collagen surrounding the scaffold that contained adipose tissue-derived stem cells. The collagen membrane was disrupted where the scaffold was sutured to fix it to the pylorus and fundus, and this membrane linked the artificial scaffold and the stomach.

Bottom Line: Grossly, the artificial scaffolds showed adhesion to the stomach and surrounding organs; however, there was no evidence of angiogenesis within the scaffolds; and VEGF, CD34, and CD105 expressions were not detected after 30 days.Although implantation of cells into artificial scaffolds did not facilitate angiogenesis, the artificial scaffolds made with type I collagen helped maintain implanted cells, and surrounding tissue reactions were rare.Our findings indicate that type I collagen artificial scaffolds can be considered as a possible implantable biomaterial.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Backgrounds/aims: Stem cell therapies for liver disease are being studied by many researchers worldwide, but scientific evidence to demonstrate the endocrinologic effects of implanted cells is insufficient, and it is unknown whether implanted cells can function as liver cells. Achieving angiogenesis, arguably the most important characteristic of the liver, is known to be quite difficult, and no practical attempts have been made to achieve this outcome. We carried out this study to observe the possibility of angiogenesis of implanted bio-artificial liver using scaffolds.

Methods: This study used adipose tissue-derived stem cells that were collected from adult patients with liver diseases with conditions similar to the liver parenchyma. Specifically, microfilaments were used to create an artificial membrane and maintain the structure of an artificial organ. After scratching the stomach surface of severe combined immunocompromised (SCID) mice (n=4), artificial scaffolds with adipose tissue-derived stem cells and type I collagen were implanted. Expression levels of angiogenesis markers including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), CD34, and CD105 were immunohistochemically assessed after 30 days.

Results: Grossly, the artificial scaffolds showed adhesion to the stomach and surrounding organs; however, there was no evidence of angiogenesis within the scaffolds; and VEGF, CD34, and CD105 expressions were not detected after 30 days.

Conclusions: Although implantation of cells into artificial scaffolds did not facilitate angiogenesis, the artificial scaffolds made with type I collagen helped maintain implanted cells, and surrounding tissue reactions were rare. Our findings indicate that type I collagen artificial scaffolds can be considered as a possible implantable biomaterial.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus