Limits...
Rapid Acclimation Ability Mediated by Transcriptome Changes in Reef-Building Corals.

Bay RA, Palumbi SR - Genome Biol Evol (2015)

Bottom Line: For long-lived organisms, acclimation likely generates a faster response but is only effective if the rates and limits of acclimation match the dynamics of local environmental variation.This is in addition to a previously observed longer term response, distinguishable by its shift in baseline expression, under nonstressful conditions.Such rapid acclimation may provide some protection for this species of coral against slow onset of warming ocean temperatures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Stanford University rbay@stanford.edu.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Bleaching resistance in Acropora nana branches acclimated under control (29°C), stable (31°C), and variable (29–33°C) conditions. Measurements were taken after 0, 2, 7, and 11 days. Bleaching is measured as the fraction of chlorophyll a retained in a particular colony after heat stress (a), calculated by dividing the concentration of chlorophyll a in heat-stressed branches (b) by that in nonstressed branches (c). Significant factors from ANOVA, “Day,” “Accl”—acclimation treatment, and “DxA”—interaction between Day and Acclimation, are shown in bottom left corner (†Day 0 was omitted for significance testing). Error bars represent standard error across six branches.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494073&req=5

evv085-F2: Bleaching resistance in Acropora nana branches acclimated under control (29°C), stable (31°C), and variable (29–33°C) conditions. Measurements were taken after 0, 2, 7, and 11 days. Bleaching is measured as the fraction of chlorophyll a retained in a particular colony after heat stress (a), calculated by dividing the concentration of chlorophyll a in heat-stressed branches (b) by that in nonstressed branches (c). Significant factors from ANOVA, “Day,” “Accl”—acclimation treatment, and “DxA”—interaction between Day and Acclimation, are shown in bottom left corner (†Day 0 was omitted for significance testing). Error bars represent standard error across six branches.

Mentions: Corals acclimated to 31 °C or variable (29–33 °C) temperature regimes showed higher thermal tolerance, measured by the proportion of chlorophyll a retained after heat stress, than corals in the control acclimation treatment (fig. 2a). Corals from all three acclimation temperatures show increased heat resistance between days 0 and 2. This is likely due to recovery from either transplant stress or some other nontemperature effect associated with moving colonies from the reef to the tanks. If we exclude day 0 and thus the artifact of transplantation, we observe a significant difference between acclimation treatments in the proportion of chlorophyll a retained in heat-stressed branches compared with nonstressed branches (P < 0.05). This pattern is also apparent in the concentration of chlorophyll a from heat-stressed branches alone; branches from 31 °C and variable acclimation treatments had more chlorophyll a after heat stress than the control (P < 0.01; fig. 2b).Fig. 2.—


Rapid Acclimation Ability Mediated by Transcriptome Changes in Reef-Building Corals.

Bay RA, Palumbi SR - Genome Biol Evol (2015)

Bleaching resistance in Acropora nana branches acclimated under control (29°C), stable (31°C), and variable (29–33°C) conditions. Measurements were taken after 0, 2, 7, and 11 days. Bleaching is measured as the fraction of chlorophyll a retained in a particular colony after heat stress (a), calculated by dividing the concentration of chlorophyll a in heat-stressed branches (b) by that in nonstressed branches (c). Significant factors from ANOVA, “Day,” “Accl”—acclimation treatment, and “DxA”—interaction between Day and Acclimation, are shown in bottom left corner (†Day 0 was omitted for significance testing). Error bars represent standard error across six branches.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494073&req=5

evv085-F2: Bleaching resistance in Acropora nana branches acclimated under control (29°C), stable (31°C), and variable (29–33°C) conditions. Measurements were taken after 0, 2, 7, and 11 days. Bleaching is measured as the fraction of chlorophyll a retained in a particular colony after heat stress (a), calculated by dividing the concentration of chlorophyll a in heat-stressed branches (b) by that in nonstressed branches (c). Significant factors from ANOVA, “Day,” “Accl”—acclimation treatment, and “DxA”—interaction between Day and Acclimation, are shown in bottom left corner (†Day 0 was omitted for significance testing). Error bars represent standard error across six branches.
Mentions: Corals acclimated to 31 °C or variable (29–33 °C) temperature regimes showed higher thermal tolerance, measured by the proportion of chlorophyll a retained after heat stress, than corals in the control acclimation treatment (fig. 2a). Corals from all three acclimation temperatures show increased heat resistance between days 0 and 2. This is likely due to recovery from either transplant stress or some other nontemperature effect associated with moving colonies from the reef to the tanks. If we exclude day 0 and thus the artifact of transplantation, we observe a significant difference between acclimation treatments in the proportion of chlorophyll a retained in heat-stressed branches compared with nonstressed branches (P < 0.05). This pattern is also apparent in the concentration of chlorophyll a from heat-stressed branches alone; branches from 31 °C and variable acclimation treatments had more chlorophyll a after heat stress than the control (P < 0.01; fig. 2b).Fig. 2.—

Bottom Line: For long-lived organisms, acclimation likely generates a faster response but is only effective if the rates and limits of acclimation match the dynamics of local environmental variation.This is in addition to a previously observed longer term response, distinguishable by its shift in baseline expression, under nonstressful conditions.Such rapid acclimation may provide some protection for this species of coral against slow onset of warming ocean temperatures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Stanford University rbay@stanford.edu.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus